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Old 10-27-2007, 01:34 PM   #1
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Default Cask conditioning with gyle

How much gyle should I use to create a cask conditioned ale? I'm thinking about brewing 6 gallons and seperating 1 gallon for gyle. I typically lose about 1 gallon in trub / racking. Is 1 gallon enough? I've never done this before but I'd like to try it.

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Old 10-27-2007, 02:18 PM   #2
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Here's an extract of the procedure I follow, by John Snyder.

1--clean and sterilze several mason jars,or large beer bottles and lids
2--take some of your wort as it reaches the end of the boil
,just prior to adding the finishing hops,and transfer the needed amount of the boiling wort to the jar,or bottle(empty the hot water first)and cap immediately.Let the wort cool to under 90 degree F and then refrigerate until your batch is ready for bottling
3---At bottling time,boil the saved wort for 10 mins.and chill,then add to the fermented beer and bottle.It is important to use the proper amount of unfermented wort for the particular beer you are priming

HERE IS A ROUGH GUIDELINE:based on 5 gallon batches.

Original gravity reading: Amount of unfermented wort:
1.030 2 quarts
1.040 1 1/2 quarts
1.050 1 1/4 quarts
1.060 1 quart
1.070 3 1/2 cups
1.080 3 cups
1.090 2 2/3 cups
1.100 2 1/2 cups

This should accomplish the type of priming you want to do.
Priming is not necessary in a true krausening,but is complicated.The home process that is outlined above should serve you well.

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Old 10-27-2007, 02:35 PM   #3
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My search for 'gyle' says it's a high gravity wort taken from the first mash to make barleywine with the grains mashed a second time to make a small beer. In light of that, Orphy's answer doesn't make any sense to me. I like Cheese's idea of making what I understand to be a gyle and I may do that myself, but Orph, did you misread his question or am I completely off the mark here?

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Old 10-27-2007, 02:43 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fingers
My search for 'gyle' says it's a high gravity wort taken from the first mash to make barleywine with the grains mashed a second time to make a small beer. In light of that, Orphy's answer doesn't make any sense to me. I like Cheese's idea of making what I understand to be a gyle and I may do that myself, but Orph, did you misread his question or am I completely off the mark here?
Orph is on the money. He knows real ale.

What I'm doing is taking a portion of wort and removing it from the fermentation process. After the bulk of my wort is in the keg, I'll reintroduce the seperated portion, the sugars from which will serve as the priming agent. This way I'm not using DME or corn sugar to condition my beer.

I'm not bottling...I'm kegging and then I'll use about 2-5 PSI just to give it enough pressure to serve.
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Old 10-27-2007, 02:46 PM   #5
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I may of miss read but I don't think so.
I think cheese is asking about Krausening with Gyle
Gyle is higher gravity unfermented wort.
Now you can make a barley wine with it or you can use it to prime a beer instead of priming sugar.
With commercial brewers they are constantly brewing so they can take the fresh mashed "Gyle" and add it to the brew that is fermented.
Home brewers rarely brew the same beer on the day they keg. So the method above takes the boiled wort and uses it as gyle but it is stored between the brew day and the kegging day.

If you'd rather work it out for yourself rather than just going form a list you can use this.

Quote:
How Much Gyle to use? Always use same batch of Wort if possible.
Multiply the gallons of your total Wort to be fermented by 12. (5 gallons x 12= 60)
Divide the the sum of the above (60) by the last 2 digits of your specific gravity.
If your your starting gravity before pitching the yeast was 1.040. Then Divide by 40.
60 divided by 40 =1.5 or [ 1-1/2 quarts Gyle ]
This number represents the amount of quarts used to prime your beer. This formula is the amount of Gyle used that would equal 5 ounces of Dextrose (Priming Sugar)
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Old 10-28-2007, 04:12 AM   #6
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I do about 1.5 qts for my Hefe's too...

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Old 10-28-2007, 05:04 AM   #7
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Oh, THAT gyle.

I guess I could have dug a little deeper in my search. Thanks for your patience.

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Old 11-01-2007, 10:12 PM   #8
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Do you think it would be better to draw off the gyle after the hotbreak, but before the first hop addition?


Ahh.... actually that might affect the hop profile of the beer, then again the ammount added probably isn't signifigant to affect the bitterness much.

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Old 11-01-2007, 10:43 PM   #9
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Twas brillig and the slithy toves did gyle and gimber in the wabe.

Got nothing, that's just what keeps coming to mind when I read this thread. Sorry for the fluff. =)

-D

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Old 11-02-2007, 03:06 AM   #10
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Last Saturday I brewed 10 gallons of bock. I usually formulate the batch for 12 gallons post boil to fit into two 6 gallon primaries. I had about 2 quarts left over so I sterilized 2 mason jars and refrigerated the left over wort. It had a O.G. of 1.068 and I was planning to dilute it to around 1.040 and use it for starters.

Now this thread has me thinking. Can I use the sterile wort for priming the Bock when it is ready to bottle? That would be pretty cool!

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