Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Can I do it all night? (mash)

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 08-20-2012, 06:36 PM   #21
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

I'm considering adding some carapils...wonder how much...? That or increasing the mash temps. I'll have to mess around with it a little. I love the convenience of getting up and only having a few hours left to finish a brew, though.

__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2012, 07:23 PM   #22
Jdslep
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Ithaca, NY
Posts: 62
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

There is alpha and beta amylase. One does coarse 'cutting' of starches (chainsaw on a tree) and the other one, whichever works at low temps, does the fine cutting that results in the simple sugars yeast eat (like clipping the smaller branches off with shears).

So it isn't just whether you have full conversion or not, it is whether you have left longer, bigger sugars (mouthfeel and sweet) or have cut everything up into simple sugars (very fermentable wort).

I think.

__________________
Jdslep is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2012, 07:26 PM   #23
rhamilton
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Austin, Texas
Posts: 1,257
Liked 64 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tre9er View Post
I'm considering adding some carapils...wonder how much...? That or increasing the mash temps. I'll have to mess around with it a little. I love the convenience of getting up and only having a few hours left to finish a brew, though.
I'm not a fan of doctoring recipes to compensate for a brewing methodology but you could add carapils or even malto-dextrin to liven up the body. But then you'd be adding more sugars which means more booze and you'll have to adjust the recipe again to keep the BU:GU in the same ratio.

If I were you, I'd crank your mash temp up to 158°F as the starting temp and see how much conversion you get. I imagine (aka total guess) that the enzymes should have about 2 hours of activity which should keep your FG a little higher. If it's still too dry, try 160°F next time. If it's too sweet, drop it 2°F and try again.

You should have it dialed in after 2-3 batches. Just keep notes so you can have you process down on paper.

Now once you can do that, you can go epic lazy:

Sunday Night: Overnight Mash
Monday Night: Boil and Overnight Cooling (AKA no-chill)
Tuesday Morning: Rack to a carboy and pitch

While it does take 3-days to complete a brew, you don't have to do much 'hands on' work other than be around for the hop additions. You just have to be comfortable with your equipment so you aren't having to worry about temps every 15 minutes.
__________________
On Deck: Cornucopia Oktoberfest
Primary: Centennial Blonde v2, Ed Wort's Kolsch
Secondary: none
Kegged: County Jail Pale Ale, AHS Anniv IPA, AHS Brooklyn Brown, Raspberry Wheat, Blood Orange Hefe, Ranger IPA clone (x2), Newcastle clone, AHS Irish Red, Centennial Blonde
Bottled: Session Series Belgian Saison, Apocalypso, Pecan Porter, DFH 90 Minute Clone, Apfelwein (x2), Wytchmaker Rye IPA Clone, Vienna/Simcoe SMaSH, Munich/Cascade SMaSH
rhamilton is offline
DPBISME Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2012, 07:38 PM   #24
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rhamilton View Post
Now once you can do that, you can go epic lazy:

Sunday Night: Overnight Mash
Monday Night: Boil and Overnight Cooling (AKA no-chill)
Tuesday Morning: Rack to a carboy and pitch

While it does take 3-days to complete a brew, you don't have to do much 'hands on' work other than be around for the hop additions. You just have to be comfortable with your equipment so you aren't having to worry about temps every 15 minutes.
Already doing something like this! Overnight mash, morning sprage/boil/initial chill, throw in ferm-chamber with temp probe taped to side of fermenter and 6-24 hours later, I pitch.
__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2012, 07:41 PM   #25
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdslep View Post
There is alpha and beta amylase. One does coarse 'cutting' of starches (chainsaw on a tree) and the other one, whichever works at low temps, does the fine cutting that results in the simple sugars yeast eat (like clipping the smaller branches off with shears).

So it isn't just whether you have full conversion or not, it is whether you have left longer, bigger sugars (mouthfeel and sweet) or have cut everything up into simple sugars (very fermentable wort).

I think.
Yeah, I understood how that worked before I started. What I didn't know was how long it takes to denature beta amylase at certain temps. The goal is to denature most of it within the first few hours, before the temp drops into it's sweet spot. That or I wasn't sure how much, if any, starches were really left after a few hours of conversion.

I'm learning more about how those enzymes work in relation to time and temp. It seems they are pretty resilient.
__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-20-2012, 07:46 PM   #26
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

So to review:

First overnight mash I began the mash at 11PM at a temp of 153. Temp eight hours later was 143. Figure it was 151-153 for the first two hours. 83% efficiency, Attenuation was 97% if my math is right (1.048 to 1.001).

Second overnight mash began at 156, 7 hours later it was 147. 80% efficiency, 1.049 OG. Will report back attenuation when I know it.

__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2012, 01:27 PM   #27
pwortiz
Strong Hand Brewing Co.
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Towaco, NJ
Posts: 370
Liked 33 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

I believe I'll be trying this myself sometime soon. I have a 10 gal igloo I'll use and blanket the heck out of it....BUT, I have a question for those that use Ovens to do this. HOW?!

Isn't the oven dial limited to 200*F as far as the "low" point goes? How do you keep it at 160?....or whatever temp you're going after?

__________________
pwortiz is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2012, 01:50 PM   #28
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pwortiz View Post
I believe I'll be trying this myself sometime soon. I have a 10 gal igloo I'll use and blanket the heck out of it....BUT, I have a question for those that use Ovens to do this. HOW?!

Isn't the oven dial limited to 200*F as far as the "low" point goes? How do you keep it at 160?....or whatever temp you're going after?
My guess is their ovens set from 150 up. Some do. Also I bet they're using kettles for mash tuns. Most coolers wouldn't fit very well in an oven.

My recommendation is to take the mash temp of the recipe and up it by 2 degrees. That's what I'm going to be doing. If it's a lower mash temp, maybe ramp it up 3-4 degrees. You want to avoid sitting in the high 140's without having denatured beta amylase. Otherwise you'll end up with super dry beer like my 1.001 Pale Ale.

I'd say the lowest I'd mash overnight, without much crystal or dextrine malt, is 155. That will still likely result in a dry-ish beer.

We'll see where my 156 mash (oktoberFAST) comes out. I'm guessing it will be slightly more dry than I wanted, but with 10% crystal and 40% Munich I'm hoping there's still some malt character.
__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2012, 02:35 PM   #29
Wynne-R
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 891
Liked 96 Times on 62 Posts
Likes Given: 75

Default Mashing in Oven

I use two 12 qt stainless pots. My oven has an analog thermostat, marked from 150-500F. If I put the mash in a 175ºF oven it will mash out over night. If I set it to 200ºF the mash will go to 170º F in an hour or two. Then I reduce it to 175ºF to maintain the mash temp until I’m ready to lauter.

If your oven won’t go below 200ºF you could experiment with turning it on and off. I wouldn’t leave it at 200ºF overnight. If you turn it off when you go to bed, it’ll still be pretty hot in the morning.

__________________
Wynne-R is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 08-21-2012, 03:36 PM   #30
tre9er
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 4,372
Liked 232 Times on 196 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wynne-R View Post
I use two 12 qt stainless pots. My oven has an analog thermostat, marked from 150-500F. If I put the mash in a 175ºF oven it will mash out over night. If I set it to 200ºF the mash will go to 170º F in an hour or two. Then I reduce it to 175ºF to maintain the mash temp until I’m ready to lauter.

If your oven won’t go below 200ºF you could experiment with turning it on and off. I wouldn’t leave it at 200ºF overnight. If you turn it off when you go to bed, it’ll still be pretty hot in the morning.
I suppose there's a way to hook up a temp controller to a 220v oven with analog dials so you can precisely control it's temp if it won't go below 200...but that seems like overkill.
__________________

_________________________________
Skal!
Den Faaborg Bryggeri

Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
Open log Fermenting and gas-can secondary?? I am planning my next brew right now!!
tre9er is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
2nd Batch, first partial mash tested last night EddieB428 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 08-29-2011 08:09 PM
It's a Wednesday night brew night Moose777 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 05-07-2010 02:43 AM
Doing mash the night before? DavidSteel All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 12 12-24-2009 08:29 PM
Mini-Mash First timer last night nickjam All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 08-17-2009 11:55 AM
mash at night, boil next day BuzzCraft All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 10 03-26-2009 05:27 PM