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Old 03-09-2007, 01:31 PM   #1
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Default Benefits of Multi-Step Mashing

Dude's post the other day about setting up a direct-fired mash tun got me thinking...

What *are* the benefits of multi-step mashing? I know it's not an absolute necessity with the modification levels of malt these days, but are there still benefits? Do people who have done multi-step mashing find that they have a better end product? What do you get out of it?

Discuss....

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Old 03-09-2007, 01:49 PM   #2
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Well Palmer says that any malt bill can benefit from a rest at 104F. States it "...improves the liquefication of the mash..." whatever that means....Resting multiple times also gives you more control over the fermentability of the wort. (but probably not as much as it used to back in the day with not so modified malt). You can go for more alcohol, drier and "crisper", or less alcohol and sweeter. Or any combination depending on where you want to do your rests.
In the minimal expierence I've had with multi-rests I've found that they increase the length of my brewday and can be a PITA. But it also adds to the fun of brewing. I'm going to start multi-rest mashing on all my recipes with my new system and see if efficiency/quality goes up....

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Old 03-09-2007, 02:44 PM   #3
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I multi-stepped with a pilsner that I have lagering right now due to concerns about haze and clarity of the pilsner malt. I've read, and heard (kai i think?) that skipping a protien rest with this type of malt/beer will result in a beer that either refuses to clear or takes months to do so. I have shied (I just say here for 45 sends re-typing that to try to figure out how to spell it. shyed? shide? shy'd?) fuxing A. screw it) away from multi stepping some other Ag bathces recently, tho, because I am dealing with a 5 gal mash tun and all those infusions fill me up quick (should have listened to all those warnings about going with a 10 gal!!!!!).

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Old 03-09-2007, 03:06 PM   #4
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I have a ten gal and have always wanted to protein rest at 104* no matter which beer category brewed, but haven't because I am worried about space and time. My results of not using the P. rest don't show any negatives, but then again I never performed one.

Is there a clear benefit to this? I mean my brew is awesome, as most HBers can contest about theirs.

Interesting topic. Reading about step mashing peeks interest because it seems that it can bring you back historically to our brothers who brewed in past times (Germania).

- WW

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Old 03-09-2007, 03:24 PM   #5
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an acid rest for a hefe will bring out more of the clove Ive read, but Ive never done that or a protein rest for anything myself. Extraction may go up a bit from a protein rest but the malts are already well modified to where you can stick with a single infusion and your beer will turn out just fine.

Not saying it couldn't be a bit better with one, but I don't have the capabilities to do one either. Maybe someday

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Old 03-09-2007, 03:41 PM   #6
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Yeah I agree. I have not missed anything from not doing a P rest - at least I don't think I have.

Does 6 RPM need this?. I have not used 6 RPM yet and would like to try it. What exactly is it used for again?

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Old 03-09-2007, 04:53 PM   #7
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I have been doing a simple steep mash for the past couple years, 10-30min at 130ºF and 145-155ºF until the starch test is negative. I notice I have some control of the fermentable sugar content of the wort. But I think it is more of a fine tuning than an adjustment. I have not ventured into more elaborate step mashing, but think I will try in the future, if for nothing else but to spend more time drinking a beer while I brew.

Also I would also consider the beer you are brewing and it's requirements, like has been mentioned on this thread there are different styles of beer that may benefit from a multi-step mash, where others are fine with out it.

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Old 03-09-2007, 05:00 PM   #8
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Better efficiency.

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Old 03-09-2007, 05:05 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewsmith
Better efficiency.
Exactly.

A protein rest (122°) is essential in a wheat beer (especially with a large amount of wheat) because it is more difficult to extract the sugars from wheat without it. I'll never do a wheat beer of any kind without a short protein rest.
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Old 03-09-2007, 05:10 PM   #10
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That's good information to know; I was thinking about maybe doing a wheat in the not-too-distant future, but I didn't know that. So if you do a wheat now, you do your steps by starting with a fairly stiff mash at the low rest temp, then adding more hot water to reach your next rest step?

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