Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Attention new all grain brewers!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-30-2007, 03:42 AM   #31
Ryanh1801
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Ryanh1801's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Addison,TX
Posts: 2,717
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts

Default

Good point yuri, I went down 20% in efficiency when I brewed with my LHBS grains instead of AHB. Which sucks cause I hate having to order grains, when I want to brew I want to be able to drive 10 miles and get the stuff. Im going to have to talk to my old roommate and see if he can machine me one of those mills, like you did. Yours looks very nice. Im too cheap to spend close to 200 on a mill.

__________________
Ryanh1801 is offline
Keithww Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 04:03 AM   #32
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 127 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

See also this thread:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=30670

It looks like Axegood might be on to a cheap DIY mill.

FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 02:06 PM   #33
Waldo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Waldo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: N.E. Iowa
Posts: 283
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
No. What I stated is correct. You want to use about 1/2 gallon per pound of grain for sparging. If you have a big brew, say 16 pounds of grain, you will be looking at 8 gallons of sparge water. With a brew that big you will be looking at roughly 10 gallons of wort in the brew kettle which equates to LOTS of boiling to get it down to a 5 1/2 gallon batch.
I don't recommend over sparging just to increase your efficiency, sure it works but you will also pick up a lot of husky grainy flavors and run the risk of tannin extraction. I think most people sparge to achieve a pre determined amount of wort in the kettle and then boil for a set time of 60, 90, 120 minutes depending on style.
For example, I do 90 minute boils, I am locked in at 80% efficiency, I do 6.5 gallon batches. I know that I need 8.75 gallons of wort in the brew kettle to end up with 6.5 gallons post boil, I use however much grain I need to achieve the desired OG based on these known numbers.
__________________

Life is to short and the liver can only handle so much, so why waste it on bad beer.


Last edited by Waldo; 05-30-2007 at 02:12 PM.
Waldo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 04:11 PM   #34
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 127 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldo
For example, I do 90 minute boils, I am locked in at 80% efficiency, I do 6.5 gallon batches. I know that I need 8.75 gallons of wort in the brew kettle to end up with 6.5 gallons post boil, I use however much grain I need to achieve the desired OG based on these known numbers.
Except that your efficiency is based on the amount of sparge water relative to the grainbill. Larger grainbills = higher sugar concentrations = greater sparging requirements.

So, if you fix your water at 8.75 gallons for all brews, then how can you 'lock in' at 80% efficiency, particularly for a high gravity brew? Does that make sense? The only way I can see this work is if you modify your grainbill to compensate. Otherwise, when you make big modifications to your grainbill, the efficiency should vary somewhat (e.g., it will be lower for a 15 lb grainbill than it would for a 10 lb grainbill).

Anyways, don't mean to hijack this thread. This topic is already being discussed here: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/showthread.php?t=30724
FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 04:16 PM   #35
Waldo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Waldo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: N.E. Iowa
Posts: 283
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

My efficiency doesn't start to suffer until the grain bill gets above 17 pounds, at 16 pounds I may lose a point or two but I usually just adjust by shooting for 2 points higher on the OG.

You did see where I said for example? That was just an example of an average sized beer, I guess you also missed the part where I said "60, 90 or 120 minute boils depending on style" big beers generally get longer boils but a 16 pound grain bill shouldn't need to be boiled for 2 hours just to get a higher efficiency.

__________________

Life is to short and the liver can only handle so much, so why waste it on bad beer.


Last edited by Waldo; 05-30-2007 at 04:28 PM.
Waldo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 04:23 PM   #36
Sir Humpsalot
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Sir Humpsalot's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 4,043
Liked 81 Times on 65 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryanh1801
Good point yuri, I went down 20% in efficiency when I brewed with my LHBS grains instead of AHB. Which sucks cause I hate having to order grains, when I want to brew I want to be able to drive 10 miles and get the stuff. Im going to have to talk to my old roommate and see if he can machine me one of those mills, like you did. Yours looks very nice. Im too cheap to spend close to 200 on a mill.
I went to walmart, but was unsuccessful locating these. A bicycle shop may be a better bet.

When I was a wee lad, kids put "pegs" on the rear axle of the bike so you could stand on the back and do tricks or take an extra passenger.

Well... I was thinking the knurling on those pegs would be just about perfect for a grain mill/crusher.

Eventually, I got lazy and just bought one, but with the pegs, a drill and some angle iron, you might be able to rig something up with a minimum of tools.
__________________
In Process: Mango Beer, Homebrewers Pale Ale
Bottled/Kegged:Spicy Light Rye, Rice-adjunct Pale Ale, Mild Bourbon Porter, Roasty Stout, Basic Light Mead, Bourbon County Stout Clone
Up Next: Berlinerweiss, Chocolate Raspberry Ale, and American IPA
Sir Humpsalot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 05:32 PM   #37
carnevoodoo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,305
Liked 13 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

So if you're shooting for a high efficiency and you end up sparging with say 7-8 gallons of water, is it necessary that you add it to the boil immediately, or can you add it as your pot starts to boil off? I basically would just have something like 8 gallons boiling with a 2 gallon reserve I'd add over time just to make sure there was room in the kettle.

I have a 42 quart pot and I really doubt that I am going to want to sit around while boiling 10.5 gallons down to 5.5 so I'll probably just take the efficiency hit when I take the step to all grain and want to make a bigger beer, but I'm wondering if that's acceptable.

Thanks.

__________________
carnevoodoo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 07:14 PM   #38
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 127 Times on 40 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Waldo
My efficiency doesn't start to suffer until the grain bill gets above 17 pounds, at 16 pounds I may lose a point or two but I usually just adjust by shooting for 2 points higher on the OG.

You did see where I said for example? That was just an example of an average sized beer, I guess you also missed the part where I said "60, 90 or 120 minute boils depending on style" big beers generally get longer boils but a 16 pound grain bill shouldn't need to be boiled for 2 hours just to get a higher efficiency.
Yep, gotcha! I was just seeking clarification -- thanks. So you are in fact modifying the amount you sparge/run-off, and compensate by modifying the length of the boil to get back to a fixed final volume, right?
__________________
Cheap 10 gal cooler MLT$3 AutosiphonAluminum Pot FAQEasy Steam Injection Mash SystemMake a Frozen Yeast Bank
Improving Stovetop Boiling Improving AG Efficiency
FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-30-2007, 08:07 PM   #39
Waldo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Waldo's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: N.E. Iowa
Posts: 283
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlyGuy
Yep, gotcha! I was just seeking clarification -- thanks. So you are in fact modifying the amount you sparge/run-off, and compensate by modifying the length of the boil to get back to a fixed final volume, right?
Yes indeed, I have profiles for 90 minute and 120 minute boils I use 90 minute boils for almost everything, really big beers and Scottish Ales get the 120 minute boil. I guess what got me with the orininal post was when he recommended collecting 10 gallons of wort for a 16 pound grain bill, just seemed like overkill on the sparging.
__________________

Life is to short and the liver can only handle so much, so why waste it on bad beer.

Waldo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-29-2007, 06:39 PM   #40
Turkeyfoot Jr.
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Turkeyfoot Jr.'s Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 364
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I'm brewing two batches this weekend for the specific purpose of sorting out my efficiency issues. Reading through this really helped by I have one question still.

If I'm using the correct volume of water how much does it matter if it's in the strike or sparge? I'm brewing two batches of beer this weekend to work out some efficiency issues. In one batch I'm going for a 1.5:1 quart/pound ratio for the mash and according to Beersmith I'd use the same ratio for my sparge to reach my desired boil volume. In the other batch I'm going for a 2:1 ratio and once again it works out that my strike and sparge volumes are almost identical. The two batches have different amounts of grain so that I could keep the volumes of water the same and get the biggest boil I can manage.

So, would it be better to keep things as they are or to drop the mash ratio in each batch by a bit and increase the sparge by the same amount? From reading this thread it sounds like most people are doing a smaller mash ratio and a larger sparge ratio but is that really necessary as long as the same amount of water is used in total?

__________________
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Primary: EMPTY!
Bottled:
Kegged: Turkeyfoot English Mild
Turkeyfoot Jr. is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Attention ALL Mississippi Brewers MVKTR2 Introductions 2 03-23-2011 02:26 AM
Attention CT Brewers! Great water source MikeRLynch General Beer Discussion 1 12-30-2008 07:56 PM
Attention South Central PA brewers... FireBrewer General Beer Discussion 0 09-05-2008 04:47 PM
ATTENTION CORPUS CHRISTI BREWERS (if there are any) Alamo_Beer General Beer Discussion 2 04-04-2007 05:10 PM