Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Attention new all grain brewers!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-11-2011, 05:39 AM   #221
hank427
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Burlington, VT
Posts: 3
Default

Really helpful. I've done three all grains so far and all three times low efficiency and missing mash temp were the two main problems I had. One question: Do you recommend a certain amount of water to pre-heat the mash tun with? Or does it really vary among brewers? Thanks!

__________________
hank427 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-25-2011, 11:21 PM   #222
millaj92
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 142
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hank427 View Post
Really helpful. I've done three all grains so far and all three times low efficiency and missing mash temp were the two main problems I had. One question: Do you recommend a certain amount of water to pre-heat the mash tun with? Or does it really vary among brewers? Thanks!
The best thing you can do to hit your temps is to not rush. Dedicate a whole day to brewing and start early, at least until you get your system down and you know it'll only take 6 hours or whatever you end up with. First of all, decide your mash ratio, whether it be 1 quart per pound of grain, 1.5 quarts per pound of grain, or somewhere in between. Heat the liquor to at least 10 degrees over your strike temp, which will be higher than your target mash temp because even if you pre-heat the mash tun, your grain will absorb heat. Pre-heat the mash tun with the total volume of liquor you'll be using to mash. Like I said, at least 10 degrees higher than needed. If you go too hot, it'll just take a few more minutes. It's easier to cool off than to heat up at this point. Throw the hot liquor in, put the lid on (and blanket if you're using one) and let it sit at least 5 minutes, I do 10. After that, check the temp. If it's too high, take the lid off and let it sit until you reach strike temp. Then, quickly dough in while stirring gently, replace the lid and walk away. If you're hitting your strike temp but not maintaining temp, that's a whole 'nother matter!
__________________
Talisman Ale Co.
Find your inspiration...
millaj92 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2011, 04:09 PM   #223
DrBrewDC
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Hesperia, MI
Posts: 245
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Here is one for ya'll. I ran into a problem and was unable to brew after I milled the grains. Certainly, the best case scenario is to mash within hours after "cracking", however, how long would it be before it would not be worth the effort? 2 Days? A week?? Two weeks?

__________________
DrBrewDC is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2011, 04:10 PM   #224
Mysticmead
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Kingston, GA
Posts: 1,255
Liked 70 Times on 51 Posts
Likes Given: 106

Default

if kept cool, dry and in an airtight container cracked grains will last several months

__________________
Mysticmead is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2011, 05:50 PM   #225
DanPoch
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DanPoch's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lancaster, MA
Posts: 254
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

+1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mysticmead View Post
if kept cool, dry and in an airtight container cracked grains will last several months
I did a batch with grains I had milled 3 months prior. Keep 'em in an airtight container in a cool place and you should be fine.
__________________

"I'd rather be happy than right, any day."

DanPoch is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-06-2011, 07:26 PM   #226
DrBrewDC
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Hesperia, MI
Posts: 245
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

Thank you. ...and if I did not keep it air tight for a week now?

__________________
DrBrewDC is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-08-2011, 01:34 PM   #227
DanPoch
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
DanPoch's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Lancaster, MA
Posts: 254
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

You're probably still just fine.

Smell the grain and taste a little bit of it. If it smells and tastes fine, you're most likely good to go. I've left my crushed grains in a canning pot with the lid on it (not air tight) for 2 weeks and have been fine. RDWHAHB

__________________

"I'd rather be happy than right, any day."

DanPoch is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-09-2011, 11:45 PM   #228
millaj92
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Plano, Texas
Posts: 142
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DrBrewDC View Post
Here is one for ya'll. I ran into a problem and was unable to brew after I milled the grains. Certainly, the best case scenario is to mash within hours after "cracking", however, how long would it be before it would not be worth the effort? 2 Days? A week?? Two weeks?
Just from my experience, milled malt starts to have a stale taste after about 7-10 days, even if put into an airtight container. It will still work for the beer, just might taste different. That being said, I've never vacuum sealed it...
__________________
Talisman Ale Co.
Find your inspiration...
millaj92 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-05-2011, 03:23 PM   #229
slatebrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Posts: 21
Likes Given: 2

Default

Rich,
Thanks for the info! I am new to AG (and the forum) and have two batches fermenting now - an American Wheat and Pale Ale (both AG kits from Northern Brewer). I followed the recipe instructions to a "T" on both. Water quantity was spot on and my mash temp was also spot on with very little heat loss by the end of the mash.

All that said, both batches appear to be much "watery" than what I would have expected. The taste (and appearance) of both are just very weak. The OG on both was low also.

Pale Ale - OG 1.04
American Wheat - OG 1.031

Any thoughts on what I screwed up??

Thanks!
Mark

__________________
slatebrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-06-2011, 02:35 PM   #230
DrBrewDC
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Hesperia, MI
Posts: 245
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

I have another question...

To this point I have always brewed from a recipe, however, I am becoming more intrigued to experiment.

Recipes usually give a time frame in which to keep in the primary, i.e. 7-10 days.

My question is: Is the specific gravity used to determine when to transfer to the secondary? Or how about this.... As a rule, when do you transfer to the secondary?

__________________
DrBrewDC is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Attention ALL Mississippi Brewers MVKTR2 Introductions 2 03-23-2011 02:26 AM
Attention CT Brewers! Great water source MikeRLynch General Beer Discussion 1 12-30-2008 07:56 PM
Attention South Central PA brewers... FireBrewer General Beer Discussion 0 09-05-2008 04:47 PM
ATTENTION CORPUS CHRISTI BREWERS (if there are any) Alamo_Beer General Beer Discussion 2 04-04-2007 05:10 PM