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Old 12-28-2010, 09:56 PM   #211
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DirDirDirty
Below is pretty much what I have. Just about anything else needed you should already have from extract! I would get digital thermometers and do away with the floaters IMHO! If you get your grains milled then you don't need a grainmill! My LHBS mills my grain!

Brew Pot ( 13 gallon )
Propane Burner
Lauter Tun (10+ gallon cooler works great)
Hydrometer and test tube
Plastic Funnel
Strainer
Hop Bags(optional)
Grain Bags
Wort Chiller
Mash paddle is good (wood, metal, plastic)
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Old 12-29-2010, 02:55 AM   #212
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Originally Posted by DirDirDirty View Post
Hey guys, so I've been doing extract brewing for almost two years now I guess and I want to start transitioning to AG. I've skimmed through this thread and searched the forum but I can't find anything in regards to what is actually needed as far as a setup.

I found this on another site:
Brew Pot ( 13 gallon )
Brew Pot ( 5-8 gallon )
Propane Burner, maybe 2
Lauter Tun
Metal Stirring Spoon
Mash Paddle
2 Floating Dairy Thermometers
Hydrometer and test tube
Plastic Funnel
Strainer
Hop Bags(optional)
Grain Bags
Wort Chiller or a big tub of ice

Is that everything I would need that I don't already have in my setup? How big a batch can that brew and would I need larger/different equipment for 10 gallon batches? If I'm looking at purchasing from a site such as midwestsupplies is this something I should look at. Any sites in particular that would be best to order from?

Any help would be much appreciated.
ok... here's my AG setup.

10 gallon boil kettle
big grain bag (home made)
hops bag (home made)
burner and propane tank
mash paddle


I do the BIAB (brew in a bag) method of brewing as well as no-chill I can do 5 gallon batches with no problem. to do 10 gallon batches you need at least a 15 gallon pot.
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Old 12-29-2010, 04:30 AM   #213
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DirDirDirty View Post
Hey guys, so I've been doing extract brewing for almost two years now I guess and I want to start transitioning to AG. I've skimmed through this thread and searched the forum but I can't find anything in regards to what is actually needed as far as a setup.

I found this on another site:
Brew Pot ( 13 gallon )
Brew Pot ( 5-8 gallon )
Propane Burner, maybe 2
Lauter Tun
Metal Stirring Spoon
Mash Paddle
2 Floating Dairy Thermometers
Hydrometer and test tube
Plastic Funnel
Strainer
Hop Bags(optional)
Grain Bags
Wort Chiller or a big tub of ice

Is that everything I would need that I don't already have in my setup? How big a batch can that brew and would I need larger/different equipment for 10 gallon batches? If I'm looking at purchasing from a site such as midwestsupplies is this something I should look at. Any sites in particular that would be best to order from?

Any help would be much appreciated.
I boil in a converted sanke and mash in a 52q igloo ice cube. You can brew in a bag, it works just fine. A nesecity is a large kettle for full volume boils. Depending on batch size will determin your kettle size. but I do 5,8 and 10 gal batches in my kettle. A refractometer is very helpful for seeing if you hit your numbers, instead of drawing a sample and cooling it before using your hydrometer.
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Old 01-23-2011, 11:43 PM   #214
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I have the same question as keepthedrive (post #175 back in May) -- my first two batches of all grain have resulted in LOT of thick hazy crap -- what am I doing wrong? Am I not allowing the mash runnings recirculate long enough to clear (no grain chunks, but still hazy)? I can't get it to whirlpool out, it just sits at the bottom of the kettle. I've been dumping the wort through a screen colander, but it seems to only get the hops.

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Old 01-24-2011, 11:37 AM   #215
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I have the same question as keepthedrive (post #175 back in May) -- my first two batches of all grain have resulted in LOT of thick hazy crap -- what am I doing wrong? Am I not allowing the mash runnings recirculate long enough to clear (no grain chunks, but still hazy)? I can't get it to whirlpool out, it just sits at the bottom of the kettle. I've been dumping the wort through a screen colander, but it seems to only get the hops.
I've notices this in my first few AG batches also. I decided to not worry about it and add Gelitan (sp) to me secondary as a clarifier. I've ended up with two of the best, and clearest, batches of brew I've ever made. I don't know what causes it, but I don't think it's anything to worry about either.
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Old 01-24-2011, 12:10 PM   #216
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I've notices this in my first few AG batches also. I decided to not worry about it and add Gelitan (sp) to me secondary as a clarifier. I've ended up with two of the best, and clearest, batches of brew I've ever made. I don't know what causes it, but I don't think it's anything to worry about either.
Are you talking about the protein break? This is normal and fine. If you use a fining agent in the boil, like irish moss or whirlfloc, you will see a lot of the "thick hazy crap" as you call it. Its not gonna hurt, the majority of it will flocculate out in the fermenter and settle to the bottom with the yeast to create the trub. I think it actually can aide the yeast in fermentation? NOt sure about that though. I only use whirfloc, chill my wort pretty quickly and then leave my bottles in the fridge about a week before drinking and I am producing some REAL clear beers!
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Old 03-04-2011, 11:50 AM   #217
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Default Good advice

I just started all grain in January.
I would like to add 2 more bits of advice.
1. Make a wet run with your new equipment.
Go through the pre-boil process using hot water.
Monitor your temps and times. If you run into a problem you haven't wasted grain. This also helps to get the "new" oder out of the tuns.
2. I used about 3 1/2 gallons to approx 10 lbs. of grain. I have found out the higher volume of water will help the mash stay at a more consistent temp.
I have very good efficiency and an excellent final product.

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Old 03-04-2011, 01:01 PM   #218
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I just started all grain in January.
I would like to add 2 more bits of advice.
1. Make a wet run with your new equipment.
Congratulations on your AG advancing.

+1 on the wet run. If you're using weedless connections I recommend a water test with each batch, even if you don't disassemble the connections.
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Old 03-05-2011, 03:23 AM   #219
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First off, new to this forum and I LOVE this site! Great job and great people. The coolest people I know are brewers!

I am getting ready to start my first all grain batch. I am in the process of finsihing building my single tier system, but what I am looking for is a full, but brief PROCESS. Single tier brewing can be tricky, with recirculation and sparging, etc. even though the priciples are the same. It would be great to see a post that very quickly, in bulletized form, show some quick steps, from cracking grain thru kegging, in a single tier system.

Does that make sense? Moving up to a RIMS system from cooking on my stove is spooking me out a bit, but i will keep trying with the help of this awesome forum.

Cheers!

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Old 03-23-2011, 08:16 PM   #220
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1. Low efficiency.
I have found that the most common thread here is not using enough water during mashing and sparging. All you need to do is figure 1 to 1 1/4 quarts of water per pound of grain for the mash and about 1/2 gallon of water per pound of grain for sparging.
I think some folks are concerned about too much wort volume when they are figuring how much water to use but if you want decent efficiency you have to use the correct amount of water.
If your brew pot isn't big enough for the volume required you will need to compensate by using more grain and know that your efficiency will be lower. (You will want to use the 1 to 1 1/4 quart per pound of grain for the mash and adjust your sparge water for the volume required)
If you have a large enough brew pot you will need to calculate the boil time so you will have the correct volume when completed. Some high gravity brews can take 2 hours or more to boil down to the correct volume.

So what your saying is that if I want to brew 10 gallons of doppelbock and I use 36 lbs of grain I'll need 27 gallons of Water!!!!!! Which means I'd have to get the 30 gallon kettles.

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