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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Any point to boiling AG?
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Old 03-07-2007, 02:08 PM   #1
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Default Any point to boiling AG?

Hey. I was just wondering if there is any point to boiling All Grain recipes other than to reduce the amount of water and raise the OG?

If I made a hop tea and did hop additions to boiling water (while reducing the amounts to account for the higher AA yield), and then added that water as a part of my second infusion, would the result be any different?

Is there any reason you need to boil the wort?

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Old 03-07-2007, 02:33 PM   #2
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And sterilize the water, who knows where those grains have been

EDIT: Also, if you mash and sparge with proper amounts of water you are going to have about 7 gals of water... you need to boil some of that off like you mentioned.

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Old 03-07-2007, 02:39 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by seefresh
And sterilize the water, who knows where those grains have been

EDIT: Also, if you mash and sparge with proper amounts of water you are going to have about 7 gals of water... you need to boil some of that off like you mentioned.

Pasteurization is at 140 degrees. Mash temps are higher than that. There should be no sanitation issues there.
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Old 03-07-2007, 02:53 PM   #4
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In my experience I've found that the boiling of the mash increases the carmel flavor (barleywines, scotch ales) especially when using lots of crystal malts. I also like the simplicity of "boil water, add hops", I've never tried making hop tea. Another factor to think about is hop utilization, even the shape of your kettle can affect that.

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Old 03-07-2007, 03:02 PM   #5
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Hmm, 140 eh? Didn't know that.

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Old 03-07-2007, 03:06 PM   #6
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That's kindof an odd question: why not boil it? Wouldn't you need to boil a hop tea for just as long to get decent AA extraction for bittering? What is saved by not boiling? (Not needing a large boiling pot, I guess.)

Also, the hot break removes protiens and starches from the wort, leading to a clearer product, right? I imagine unboiled beer would be very cloudy.

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Old 03-07-2007, 03:38 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Toot
Pasteurization is at 140 degrees. Mash temps are higher than that. There should be no sanitation issues there.
Pasteurization is not sterilization. Pasteurization is not intended to kill all micro-organisms.

I wouldn't take the chance.
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Old 03-07-2007, 03:40 PM   #8
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Reducing the volume is a requirement for all grain, simply because you need to sparge with excess water to get all of the sugars out. Other reasons have been listed. Many spores can survive pasturization, but few can handle 60 minutes of boiling.

It seems as though you are also suggesting boiling/hopping the sparge water, not sure why you would do that. You would have to cool it off before adding it to the mash and it wouldn't really make any difference to the bittering levels.

I'd say give it a try and report back.

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Old 03-07-2007, 03:46 PM   #9
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This was just posted by AdIN in another thread... seems relevant to this one as well:

Quote:
Good rolling boil also required in order to coagulate proteins in your wort and create good hot break material. As Kadmium said it also required to get rid of diacetyl, for that boil with 10-15% evaporation rate should be good enough. It means you can have cover partially on as long as you provide correct evaporation rate. And try to avoid condensations from the cover dripping back in to your wort.
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Old 03-07-2007, 03:47 PM   #10
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You're also missing the hot break which is way more important in all grain. Extract is already boiled prior to reduction so it's not as big a deal (or so I've heard). Damn, same time post.!!

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