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Old 05-16-2013, 03:52 PM   #1
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Default All-grain recipe from 'peeled wheat'

I'm new to this forum, but I've been looking for a while to the answer to my question. I've been an extract brewer for several years now. However, I currently live in a country where it is impossible to get beer making supplies, including extracts or brewing grains. However, I found something in a store called 'peeled wheat.' My question is whether I can use this in an all-grain recipe of any kind, and how I would do it, since I'm pretty new to the all-grain brewing world. It's also called "harees." Any help would be appreciated. I've also attached a picture if this helps. Thanks!

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Old 05-16-2013, 05:43 PM   #2
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So I guess it's wheat with no husks?

Harees seems to be a middle eastern dish made with cracked wheat and chicken, not just the wheat malt itself:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harees

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Old 05-16-2013, 07:04 PM   #3
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Yes, I believe it's wheat with no husks. It's called Harees in Arabic, but it can refer(I believe) to either the dish or just the grain itself. Can it be used in some sort of mash to make some kind of wheat beer, or can nothing be done?

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Old 05-16-2013, 07:13 PM   #4
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Is it malted? Malted wheat has enough diastatic power to self-convert, so you could use it as a base malt, husk or not.

The proteins in the husk help with head retention, so you might miss out on that, but you should be able to make beer.

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Old 05-17-2013, 03:10 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musicalcow View Post
Yes, I believe it's wheat with no husks. It's called Harees in Arabic, but it can refer(I believe) to either the dish or just the grain itself. Can it be used in some sort of mash to make some kind of wheat beer, or can nothing be done?
It can be utilized but the problem is that you need malted grain to provide enzymes to convert the grain's starches into sugar. That's what a mash is. Your wheat is not malted so you will need another source for the enzymes. Malted barley is the usual choice in beer brewing but if as you said brewing supplies and ingredients are not available in your area it becomes a roadblock. Yeast can't eat starch so unless you can come up with an enzyme source it's going to be just about impossible to make beer with that wheat. Can you order supplies from an internet or catalog source?
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Old 05-17-2013, 06:16 AM   #6
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I can get supplies about once a year when I travel back to the USA. However, it would need to be something relatively small that I can put in my bags. I can't really take several kilos of malted grain. I've been making small beers with molasses with the hops that brought this past year. So, if there is an enzyme that I can get to convert the starches into sugar, that would be great.

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Old 05-17-2013, 02:46 PM   #7
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So I guess you are in a Middle Eastern country? I hope you are not in one of the ones where they lop your balls off in the city square for producing/drinking alcohol, or gouge your eyes out for hanging out on U.S. forum boards

Oh sh*t. They probably have a file on me now just for responding to you!

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Old 05-17-2013, 05:16 PM   #8
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Try lookign for amalyse enzyme. Its the enzyme present in malted barley that converts the startches to sugars.
Should be availble in most LHBS wehn you return or Online catalogs if you can get packages like that.

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Old 05-18-2013, 07:44 AM   #9
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I've found the amalyse enzyme from several online homebrew stores. My next question is how much to use since I won't be using malted grains. The information I found says about 1 teaspoon for a 5 gallon batch. Does that sound about right if I use these grains?

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