Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > aerating the wort

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-23-2007, 06:47 AM   #1
jagg
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: North Central NC
Posts: 526
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default aerating the wort

I see on most recipes they say to aerate the wort before pitching yeast, has anyone ever just poured the wort from one bucket to the other several time? Will this (Aerate) the wort ok, or would it be overkill? whats the best way yall have found to do this? thanks

__________________
jagg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 08:27 AM   #2
BarryNL
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Netherlands
Posts: 84
Default

I think the accepted best way is to use a pond/aquarium aerator stone and pump, or ideally oxygen canister (get them from a brew shop - not all will work for beer).

Personally, I don't bother though - I just stick the stirring paddle in an electric drill and thrash the hell out of the wort for a couple of minutes.

Other people seem to like to shake the carboy, though that always seems like a good way to end up with your kitchen covered in wort and broken glass.

__________________
Brewing: Dunkelweizen '09, alt.beer.dusseldorf
Bottled: Erebus American IPA, Big 4-0 Barley Wine, Oranje Tripel, Got Milk Stout?
Planning: Oktoberfest, Peter the Grain RIS
Drinking: Abbey Daze, Best of 2008
BarryNL is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 09:16 AM   #3
Ó Flannagáin
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Wichita Falls, Tx
Posts: 3,026
Liked 15 Times on 10 Posts

Default

I bought the little guy pictured below. I use it on the end of my siphoning tube. After that, I put the lid on the bucket and shake the **** out of it. Seems to be working fine. I hope you don't mind, but I have a quick question involving aeration and I'd like to just tag it on to this thread:

How necessary is a "perfect" aeration. Does it effect the flavor or just how long the yeast take to get fully active? I didn't know about aeration during my first 2 brews and they didn't get aerated at all, but seemed to turn out just fine.

__________________
Ó Flannagáin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 10:15 AM   #4
lgtg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Southwest Florida
Posts: 199
Default It's mostly about...

Quote:
Originally Posted by seefresh
I bought the little guy pictured below. I use it on the end of my siphoning tube. After that, I put the lid on the bucket and shake the **** out of it. Seems to be working fine. I hope you don't mind, but I have a quick question involving aeration and I'd like to just tag it on to this thread:

How necessary is a "perfect" aeration. Does it effect the flavor or just how long the yeast take to get fully active? I didn't know about aeration during my first 2 brews and they didn't get aerated at all, but seemed to turn out just fine.

Aeration is mostly about yeast health, your aerating provides valuble nutrients for cell reproduction. It matters by way of preparing the proper environment for yeast to gather "momentum" for fermentation, it also may enhance the speed in which the yeast begin fermenting. I think with proper amounts of aeration in the wort prior to pitching, the yeast can reproduce in this highly aerated state much faster, without getting "tired".

It sholdn't have much to do with taste quality.
__________________
lgtg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 11:35 AM   #5
Ó Flannagáin
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Wichita Falls, Tx
Posts: 3,026
Liked 15 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by lgtg
Aeration is mostly about yeast health, your aerating provides valuble nutrients for cell reproduction. It matters by way of preparing the proper environment for yeast to gather "momentum" for fermentation, it also may enhance the speed in which the yeast begin fermenting. I think with proper amounts of aeration in the wort prior to pitching, the yeast can reproduce in this highly aerated state much faster, without getting "tired".

It sholdn't have much to do with taste quality.
Cool, thanks for the reply. Just wondered.. could bad aeration be a cause for the yeast not reaching full attenuation?
__________________
Ó Flannagáin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 12:04 PM   #6
McTarnamins
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
McTarnamins's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: St. Louis
Posts: 254
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I aerated for the first time this batch with an oxygen bottle and 5 micron stone. The beer was done in the primary in 3.5 days. I had almost immediate fermentation. At Day 2 the fermentation was almost violent. And this was with my first full boil AG recipe.

Previous batches that lacked the pure o2 did not ferment as quickly or violently and had a longer lag time.

For $35 the O2 aerator was as good of an investment as a wort chiller.


__________________
Keg 1 : Belgian IPA
Keg 2 : Oktoberfest Lager (currently lagering)
Keg 3 : Tap Cleaning Fluid
Keg 4 :
Conical Left:
Conical Right:American Wheat (7-day G2G)
On Deck: Pumpkin Ale, Apocalypso Ale (AHB)

"Save your sack; Brew in a Bag"
McTarnamins is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 12:34 PM   #7
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 21,834
Liked 907 Times on 604 Posts
Likes Given: 26

Default

I understand the concept to be this; Oxygen puts yeast into a reproductive state and allows the cells to store energy for the fermentation process.

The million dollar question is how much O2 do they really need? My followup to that question is how many yeast cells are you initially pitching and how much attenuation are you expecting? There are so many variables.

If you watch the video in my sig, you'll find that higher O2 levels likely allow for fuller attenuation. You'll also see that the simply shaking method seems to be "good enough" as most people will attest. I'll probably run another batch and test some other variables in the near future.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 01:18 PM   #8
Ó Flannagáin
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Wichita Falls, Tx
Posts: 3,026
Liked 15 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Hey Bobby_M, I've watched your video before, very cool, but I got a question. Was the FG different on all of them? Or did they end up the same?

__________________
Ó Flannagáin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 01:36 PM   #9
Bobby_M
Vendor and Brewer
HBT_SPONSOR.png
Vendor Ads 
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Bobby_M's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Whitehouse Station, NJ
Posts: 21,834
Liked 907 Times on 604 Posts
Likes Given: 26

Default

The FG results I have were after 144 hours and I never thought to take another reading (another potential flaw in the experiment). I suppose all three batches could have ultimately settled into the same gravity but I doubt it. After the initial staggered lags, the O2 injected wort always stayed a couple points lower than the rest. Of course, I'm jumping to conclusions so I'll be sure to take a final gravity before "disposing" of the samples.

__________________
BrewHardware.com
Sightglass, Refractometer, Ball Valve, Weldless bulkhead, Thermometer, Decals, Stainless Steel Fittings, Compression Fittings, Camlock Quick Disconnects, Scale, RIMS tube, Plate Chiller, Chugger Pump, Super Clear Silicone Tubing, and more!

New Stuff?
Bobby_M is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-23-2007, 01:45 PM   #10
Cookiebaggs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oak Creek, WI
Posts: 555
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

This idea comes from Mike. An owner of a local homebrew shop I go to. I haven't made one yet but plans are in the works.

http://www.frugalwestallis.com/index.php

Venturi Tube Wort Aerator


Ever wonder what to do with those old yeast vials sitting around the brewery? I dont. Turn one into a Wort Aerator. If you noticed, they fit the neck of your carboy very well, and screwing the cap onto it keeps it from falling into the carboy. Remember, this item must be used in a vertical position or it will leak wort from the tube, its a gravity thing.

http://www.kettlemoraine.com/mikesbe...s/aerator1.jpg


Heres what you do. Take a 6 inch length of tubing ( vinyl, copper, brass, or stainless depending on your fabrication skills ), drill 4-6 small holes, about .020" diameter into the center 1.5" of it. I used a spiral pattern for the holes, believing that it causes more turbulence, but the aerator tube will work fine with holes period. Drill a hole in the top and bottom of the vial to pass the tubing through, make the hole small enough to fit the tubing snugly. Drill some more small holes for air entry into the cap of the vial, I settled with four one-eighth inch holes. Put a cotton ball just under the lid, this is to be an air filter to keep contaminates out of your wort as it draws the air through and into your wort.

No need to spend money on oxygen bottles or cleaning of those difficult airstones anymore! This is the brewers favorite price point here.... free oxygen! Only one very small warning, if you drill the aerator tube holes too large, wort will leak out of the holes and fill the vial over time. You need to pay attention to the vial if you are allowing pressure to build in the carboy (too tight of a fit in the carboy), wort will fill the vial, soak the cotton and quit working. I now am drilling a 1/16 inch pressure relief / drain hole in the bottom of the vial where it is inside the carboy, venting the air under pressure in from the carboy. They work well in usage, especially if you use a rubber band around the tube to raise it in the neck of the carboy, as I have been suggesting, to increase the fill space in the fermenter before the aerator touches the wort.

WARNING: Do not use this item unsupervised, as you will need to be around to shake down the foam as your fermenter fills, or it will overflow with frothy wort.

Since I started using this device on every beer, I have not had ONE beer finish with high terminal gravities. No stuck ferments, no problems, even when I underpitched my yeast. These are also able to be autoclaved if you use metal tubing.

Follow this picture and you should get one of these sweet gadgets done in less than one hour.

(BELOW) Heres a look at the holes drilled into the tube, there are 4 holes in a spiral around the tube. Only two are shown. There is also a ring of holes in the lid to let aeration air in through the cotton ball filter. More holes than needed (8) are in the shown part. You could use half (4) of that. If you still need to use your oxygen / airstone unit, blast your wort at about 4 hours post pitch, and again at 12 hours, this will give yeast some boost when it needs it according to the yeast doctors.

http://www.kettlemoraine.com/mikesbe...s/aerator2.jpg

__________________
Cookiebaggs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aerating your wort SpanishCastleAle General Techniques 35 02-04-2009 08:34 PM
aerating the wort Mr. Awesome Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 17 07-03-2008 03:40 AM
Aerating hot wort Hikeon3 General Techniques 6 06-19-2008 09:21 PM
Aerating wort. mikeyc General Techniques 12 11-07-2007 03:54 PM
aerating wort neuron555 General Techniques 3 10-12-2007 04:18 AM