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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Advice for First BIAB All Grain
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Old 03-29-2012, 04:03 AM   #1
zyx345
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Default Advice for First BIAB All Grain

I'm going to attempt my first All Grain BIAB within the next few weeks. I'll be brewing Northern Brewer's Dead Ringer IPA, which includes 12# of grain.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/docume...dRingerIPA.pdf

Can you please critique my process?

I'm going to do a split boil. My equipment is as follows:

-10 Gallon Cooler (soon to be picked up)
-2 Home Depot 5 gallon paint strainer bags
-5 Gallon Pot
-4 Gallon Pot
-6.5 Gallon Bucket (ale pail)
-6 Gallon Carboy
-Immersion Copper Wort Chiller 25' (soon to be picked up)

My plan is to split the grain into 6# in each bag and mash for 60 minutes in the 10 Gallon cooler with 1.25q per pound of grain. I may preheat the cooler with 185 degree water then when it drops to around 166 degrees I'll add the grain.

Next dump the first runnings into the ale pail, and sparge with 170 degree water to bring up to +/- 6.5 gallons of total wort in the Ale Pail.

Then split that wort evently into the 4 and 5 gallon pots and half all the hop additions to each pot.

Cool each with the wort chiller down to +/-70 degrees then combine the wort in the 6 gallon carboy, aerate, then pitch the yeast.

Anything I may have missed or additional advice?

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Old 03-29-2012, 04:38 AM   #2
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No advice or critique here. But as a newb, I have questions. I am curious as to why you are doing 2 separate boils. What are the benefits of this way VS doing a 4.5 gal boil and topping off into the fermenter?

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:06 AM   #3
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The volume of water required to get extraction efficiency is the reason for the two boils.

Regarding your process, what is the plan for closing the 6# bags of grain or do you plan to place them side by side and keep them open? I'd add the water to cooler first to preheat and let it drop to your strike temp, and then add grains to help hit mash temp. You will need to stir grains in bags to prevent balls of dry grain which is why is asked about closing or opening them.

Also, coming from someone who just went all-grain, invest in a good thermometer with probe. I'd recommend a thermocoupler. It was my first purchase after my first AG batch.

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:56 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djevans3 View Post
Regarding your process, what is the plan for closing the 6# bags of grain or do you plan to place them side by side and keep them open?

Also, coming from someone who just went all-grain, invest in a good thermometer with probe. I'd recommend a thermocoupler. It was my first purchase after my first AG batch.
Thanks. My plan for the 6# bags is to stir each well then tie off the top ends for each. The reason for splitting the grain bill to 2 bags is so its easier to lift them out and I believe the max grain for a 5 gallon home depot bag is 10#.

I'll take a look for a good thermometer. Right now I plan to use my clip thermometer that attaches to my boil pot.
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:47 PM   #5
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Using 2 kettles on a weak, indoor range also allows the lesser amount of water in each kettle to be brought to a fast, full rolling boil.

For the mash, I tie the bags with sanitized, thick rubberbands. Works like a charm. The OP may want to consider rinsing the paint strainer bags and adding the kettle hops to them to minimize trub. Just be sure to wrap the ends of the bags around your kettle handle away from the flame. No need for the rubber bands at this stage.

I suggest creating an ice bath in the sink for the smaller kettle and use the wort chiller for the larger kettle.

I assume you're using the bottling bucket for the primary and carboy for the secondary? Get yourself 2 more oz. dryhops. Good luck!

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Old 03-29-2012, 02:42 PM   #6
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What I'm about to suggest is a matter if debate and I'm certain others will differ.

That being said, I'd suggest a higher water to grain ratio. I find that 1.5 works really well and improved my mash efficiency.

If your cooler the taller round water cooler, you should have no problems holding your grain bill and that much liquid.

+1 on preheat the tun before adding grain. I followed Yooper's advice and heat strike water to 175*, add to tun, and place the lid on. I stir occasionally to get down to strike temperature and then add grain. My tun holds temp great with this process modification. It takes 15-20 minutes to drop to correct strike temperature.

Cheers

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Old 03-29-2012, 04:36 PM   #7
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This is actually a really good idea... I wish I would have thought about this before I got my 10 gallon pot. Could have saved a couple bucks.

But I think your process looks good. You'll get a better idea of efficiency once you get a couple batches in. I've also heard that doing full volume BIAB works great too and provides great efficiency. Just throwing that out there.

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:35 PM   #8
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I thought the point of BIAB is to do it all in one pot and be done with it?

I put 7 gallons of water in my pot and heat to 6 degrees above my strike temp, put all the grain in the bag (ive put over 10 lbs in a home depot paint strained), stir like mad for about 5 minutes, check temp and adjust if needed, wrap in a blanket and let it sit for 60 minutes with a stir every 20 minutes or so while checking temp and adjusting,then removing grain and starting the boil. Makes it very easy and relatively mess free. I've been getting 70-75% efficiency with that, though my first one was in the low 60's.

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:38 PM   #9
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If I were you, I would not bother picking up the cooler. Just do two traditional BIAB brews w/ the 4 and 5 gallon pots, combine finished worts and ferment. Am I missing something?

You could stagger the two batches like 20 - 30 minutes to make it more manageable.

OK edit, better Idea. Mash all 12 pounds BIAB in the 5 gallon pot. Put it in a warm oven to maintain heat. Dunk sparge in the 4 gallon and the pail to generate the required runnings. Split between your two kettles and boil. Keep it simple

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:43 PM   #10
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Don't forget in your water calculations to deduct for grain absorption in the first runnings, and also verify your pot is big enough to hold water plus grains displacement.

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