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Old 08-12-2012, 09:04 PM   #11
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There's always been some roasted malts in most of recipes that need to be mashed among with other malts in the grain bill .

I use my home-made roasted malt in order to give some bready aroma to the Beer .

It takes about 30 minutes for the pH to reach the desired range , every time I mash my base malt . Therefore , I can't just steep the roasted and crystal malt together .

Hector
Ya know, I think that you have some misconceptions about the process. There is absolutely nothing wrong with mashing the "roasted" and crystal malt together. But keep in mind that if your roast malt is very dark, you've denatured the enzymes in it. Without enzymes to convert starch to sugar, you can't technically mash.
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Old 08-12-2012, 09:21 PM   #12
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And crystal malts don't need mashing since they're already fully converted. Just steeping them is fine. Dark malts are good for bringing down the pH though so if you have other grains it's good.

Also sometimes you want a longer boil to hit your target boil volume. Say you got too much water from sparging you can do a longer boil. This would also let you do a thinner mash which can aid efficiency.

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Old 08-12-2012, 09:52 PM   #13
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But keep in mind that if your roast malt is very dark, you've denatured the enzymes in it.
They aren't very dark . I roasted my pale malt in the Oven at 320 F for 30 minutes .

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Old 08-12-2012, 11:09 PM   #14
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They aren't very dark . I roasted my pale malt in the Oven at 320 F for 30 minutes .

Hector
That's still enough to denature some of the enzymes. And there's still no reason you can't do your roast malt and crystal together.
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Old 08-13-2012, 08:26 AM   #15
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That's still enough to denature some of the enzymes. And there's still no reason you can't do your roast malt and crystal together.
Yes , but I think that I can still get some gravity points from it .

I've seen some recipes which contain chocolate malt and it also gives some gravity points , although it's much darker than my home-roasted malt .

This is the first time I'm going to brew that way .

The reason I'm going to steep crystal malt separately is that I'd like to be sure that I would have 5 gravity points from roasted malt and

7 gravity points from crystal malt .

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Old 08-13-2012, 12:15 PM   #16
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Yes , but I think that I can still get some gravity points from it .

I've seen some recipes which contain chocolate malt and it also gives some gravity points , although it's much darker than my home-roasted malt .

This is the first time I'm going to brew that way .

The reason I'm going to steep crystal malt separately is that I'd like to be sure that I would have 5 gravity points from roasted malt and

7 gravity points from crystal malt .

Hector
You're not understanding what we're saying. You will get the same amount of sugars out of the crystal and the toasted malt, if you put them together. There is no reason to keep them separate. They can all go in the same mash/steep or whatever you're doing. There is no diastatic power in either of them.
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Old 08-13-2012, 12:33 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Yooper

You're not understanding what we're saying. You will get the same amount of sugars out of the crystal and the toasted malt, if you put them together. There is no reason to keep them separate. They can all go in the same mash/steep or whatever you're doing. There is no diastatic power in either of them.
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Steeping the crystal malt, and mashing the dark malt separately just adds more time to your brew day that is unnecessary. You would do well to listen to Yooper, and the other guys, they know what they're talking about.
If you want to experiment, that's fine, but don't discount good advice either.
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Old 08-13-2012, 10:27 PM   #18
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There is no diastatic power in either of them.
Even chocolate malt has diastatic power .

Mine is not so dark as chocolate malt .

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Old 08-13-2012, 10:49 PM   #19
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Even chocolate malt has diastatic power .

Mine is not so dark as chocolate malt .

Hector
I've never used a brand of chocolate malt that has any diastatic power, so you must have other brands available to you in your location. I only have Briess, Crisp, Castle and Thomas Fawcett chocolate malts available to me. But I can't imagine how any chocolate malt could have any diastatic power left, because of how it's made. If you have a specific brand with a link to the actual diastatic power showing ability to convert itself, I would be very interested!

As was mentioned, once you toasted the malt, you denatured the enzymes. You can soak it all you want, but it will not be "mashing" since no conversion will be taking place. It's much like crystal malt in that way. The sugars in crystal malt are crystallized, and so available via steeping. The same is true of darker malts.

There are a few darker colored malts that can convert themselves- like one brand of English amber malt. Most amber malts can't even convert, as they have 0 diastatic power.
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Old 08-13-2012, 11:00 PM   #20
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I have yet to see anything remotely close to the darkness of chocolate malt have diastatic power. 20-30 degrees lintner is usually considered the cut off for self conversion, so thats pretty much your 20 degree lovibond toasted malts (something like a dark munich or aromatic malt). As your kilning time and heat increase, you denature enzymes which means as color goes up your conversion power goes down.

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