Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > 2-Row - 6-Row differences
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-05-2010, 10:22 PM   #1
Wellshooter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: San Angelo, Texas
Posts: 380
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default 2-Row - 6-Row differences

I have been using 6-Row as a base grain for my light beers, but now it is time to get more grain. I was wondering what the MAJOR difference is between 6-row and 2-row.

Thanks

__________________

"Doubt is not a pleasant mental state, but certainty is a ridiculous one." - Voltaire

Wellshooter is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-05-2010, 10:37 PM   #2
humann_brewing
More Humann than human
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
humann_brewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: the sun
Posts: 15,689
Liked 311 Times on 309 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

I am not an expert but you might want to check these links out

http://www.brewingwithbriess.com/Mal...s_Traveled.htm

http://www.brewingtechniques.com/bmg/schwarz.html

__________________
humann_brewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 12:56 AM   #3
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Major differences? Not pronounced at all. In fact, the differences are very subtle, relatively speaking. The Briess link has good information; read it.

First, flavor differences are very minimal. In a single-malt beer you may note a difference in flavor, but you have to look for it.

The second difference is mechanical. Six-row pale malt offers more husk material than two-row, which can improve lautering.

Third is enzymatic. Six-row offers more enzymes than two-row.

[NB: The above two differences make six-row an excellent base malt for high-adjunct beers, from Light Lager to Belgian-style Witbier.]

Fourth, six-row tends to be higher in protein. This can lead to haze problems in the finished beer unless the mash is manipulated to prevent the effect.

Fifth, color. While there is no difference in color to speak of in the base malt, the higher levels of protein in six-row malt can lead to faster development of color in Maillard reactions.

They're both good tools to have in your toolbox.

Cheers!

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 04:12 AM   #4
Rossnaree
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 217
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Would that mean that 6-row makes a better base for wheat ales than 2-row? Just thinking that wheat wouldn't have any husks which would benefit from the extra husk material in the 6-row, and the beer would already have a higher propensity for being cloudy anyhow, so -- ??? Make sense or am I just still too much of a noob?

I've been bitten for life by various wheat beers.... I never had a commercial one that I really liked, but now I've never (yet) had a homebrewed wheat that I haven't thoroughly enjoyed. I've only done extract hefeweizen so far, but AG is on the near horizon and I'd like to know what's "best," if there is such a thing, before I jump in.

Thanks in advance, and I hope this doesn't constitute a hijack of the thread.

__________________

Some knowledge will never be shared, not from a desire to conceal it, but because it is so common to the individual that it is assumed to be already known.

Primary: Chardonel
Secondary: Apfelwein, Chambourcin, Blackstone Pond American Ale, King of the North, Concord, 2nd wine from pulp of both
Bottled: Bavarian Hefeweizen, Dortmunder, King of the North (2010), Apfelwein (2010), Lesser Wilderness Mead (2010), King of the North (2nd wine - 2010)

Rossnaree is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 11:21 AM   #5
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

I don't think 6-row makes a better base for wheat ales. First, the haze issue isn't anything like what you find with wheat beers. Second, you don't need the extra diastatic power, because the wheat used in Hefeweizen is malted. Third, traditionally two-row pale malts are used in Hefeweizen, in the form of Pilsner malt.

That said, you should still try six-row malt in your quest for the perfect Hefeweizen for your tastes. You never know.

There's really no such thing as "best". There's "most popular", there's "perhaps that's grudging consensus", there might even be "a riotous argument".

The "best" thing in a particular application is the thing which works best for you, in your brewery, to your tastes.

Me, I'd brew some Hefeweizen in the most traditional manner before I went screwing with it. Then, if it still didn't have the "Oh my stars and garters, this stuff is good!" I was looking for, I'd start subbing ingredients.

Cheers,

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
nitpicker Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 12:37 PM   #6
Rossnaree
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 217
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Gotcha... and thanks. And yeah, that's the approach I'd prefer, heading toward what's worked for generations and only until it's still not "right" by me, then, start trying something different. If I don't know where I'm going, I won't know when I get there. Every apprentice was instructed to obey the established norms and master the craft before ever considering the various "what if's." I figure I'll follow suit.

I knew about the malted wheat being more than capable of starch conversion, what I was wondering was if the excess husk material of the 6-row would offset wheat's lack of husks and in that way be "best" in preventing compaction without having to add rice hulls or anything else, or if it was even an issue to begin with. I know there's no "best," I suppose I was just wondering about "better" when I asked that. Thanks for setting that straight, I appreciate it. Also nothing wrong with "both" in the end if it's justified, eh? But yeah - I'll stick with what's tried and true. And when all's said and done, my future "experiments" may not fit any style or class anyhow. Maybe that's how each class and style began, anyways, right? ahhh... I can't see it now - my own famous wheat beer! lol!!!

- Tim

__________________

Some knowledge will never be shared, not from a desire to conceal it, but because it is so common to the individual that it is assumed to be already known.

Primary: Chardonel
Secondary: Apfelwein, Chambourcin, Blackstone Pond American Ale, King of the North, Concord, 2nd wine from pulp of both
Bottled: Bavarian Hefeweizen, Dortmunder, King of the North (2010), Apfelwein (2010), Lesser Wilderness Mead (2010), King of the North (2nd wine - 2010)

Rossnaree is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 12:48 PM   #7
lurker18
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
lurker18's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 607
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I am no expert, but if you are using 6 row for just the extra husk, there is not that much of a difference. You may save yourself from a stuck sparge one time out of 10. The big difference in the two is the enzyme power of a 6 row is quite a bit more than 2 row, and therefore can help in poorly modified adjuncts. I used it in a rye wheat brew, using raw unmalted rye, and the 6 row in my opinion helped with converting the rye.

__________________
lurker18 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 01:26 PM   #8
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rossnaree View Post
I knew about the malted wheat being more than capable of starch conversion, what I was wondering was if the excess husk material of the 6-row would offset wheat's lack of husks and in that way be "best" in preventing compaction without having to add rice hulls or anything else, or if it was even an issue to begin with.
I've never used rice hulls in a Hefeweizen mash. I'll have to check my notes to see how many times I've had a stuck mash...

[rifles papers, clicks mouse lots]

...none. Never, not once. We're talking hundreds of mashes here, pro and am. All just 2-row and wheat malt, 50/50%. IMO, it's a non-issue, especially if you're batch-sparging. If you're doughing in right, you're getting a good enough mix that rice hulls really aren't necessary.

Now, Witbier is another story! There I use rice hulls every time. But that's an entirely different grist involving something like 75% unhulled grain...

Cheers,

Bob
__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-06-2010, 05:29 PM   #9
ricenbeans
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Athens
Posts: 4
Default

one thing that was not mentioned is that 2-row gives more extract per weight. 6-row has more husk material that comes at the expense of the endosperm material (the starch to be converted during mashing). Malted wheat does not have the diastatic power that malted barley does, so a wheat bear with some adjuncts in it would probably benefit from some 6-row. As far as preventing stuck runoff, 6-row probably would not make much difference. You might as well just use rice hulls.

__________________
ricenbeans is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
differences in grain types dcarter All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 20 02-04-2012 02:24 AM
Differences between Munich and Vienna Northcalais40 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 9 11-04-2010 09:29 PM
Efficiency Differences sdbrew1024 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 04-16-2009 03:51 PM
Who can explain the differences hoffie38 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 05-23-2008 06:23 AM
PM & AG differences missing link All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 11-19-2007 09:54 PM