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Old 12-05-2007, 08:47 PM   #1
jiffybrew
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Default Wondering how commercial breweries carbonate in the bottle?

I'm curious... My guess is that they force carbonate, like soda pop.

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Old 12-05-2007, 08:59 PM   #2
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i know arcadia partially force carbs
bell's brewing says right on the bottle"bottle conditioned, decant to serve"

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Old 12-05-2007, 09:03 PM   #3
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It's pretty obvious if they do - there'll be yeast sediment in the bottle. If there isn't, it was filtered and force carbed before bottling - the majority of commercial beer is done this way.

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Old 12-05-2007, 09:17 PM   #4
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some beers actually naturally carbonate the entire big batch of beer then bottle it the way you would bottle forced carbonated beer. It must be an interesting operation to watch, and a well designed huge tank to hold all that pressure.

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Old 12-06-2007, 02:25 AM   #5
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I thought when I toured a brewery this fall, they said they caught the CO2 off of fermentation, stored it as a liquid, and then used it as part of their canning/bottling process.

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Old 12-06-2007, 03:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_corn
I thought when I toured a brewery this fall, they said they caught the CO2 off of fermentation, stored it as a liquid, and then used it as part of their canning/bottling process.
huh?

what brewery is that? so, they compress it to form liquid, then they shoot it into the beer, hehe...that sounds interesting
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:09 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweet_corn
I thought when I toured a brewery this fall, they said they caught the CO2 off of fermentation, stored it as a liquid, and then used it as part of their canning/bottling process.
I guess its cheaper than buying co2? maybe. At the very least it is a neat little trick.
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:17 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigben
what brewery is that? so, they compress it to form liquid, then they shoot it into the beer, hehe...that sounds interesting
It's a common practice among big breweries since it's fairly efficient. It's been discussed among homebrewers but fairly unanimously agreed that it's impractical at best on a small scale.
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Old 12-06-2007, 04:32 AM   #9
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Force carbonation is actually only used by small brewers. The bigger ones carbonate during the secondary fermentation/lagering by simply keeping the fermentation vessels under controlled pressure. This is pretty easy to do (even for the home brewer) and much cheaper than buying CO2. If the brewery is big enough they also harvest the CO2 from the fermentation and use it in the brewing process or sell it.

German brewers have to use fermentation CO2 for carbonation. Any other CO2 violates the Reinheitsgebot.

Kai

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Old 12-06-2007, 05:00 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
Force carbonation is actually only used by small brewers. The bigger ones carbonate during the secondary fermentation/lagering by simply keeping the fermentation vessels under controlled pressure. This is pretty easy to do (even for the home brewer) and much cheaper than buying CO2. If the brewery is big enough they also harvest the CO2 from the fermentation and use it in the brewing process or sell it.
Kai
But if the beer is already carbonated in the fermentation vessel and they fill the bottle, doesnt the beer foam all over the place while bottling?
hmm....
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