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Old 06-18-2006, 11:33 PM   #1
thebull
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I am getting plenty of foam from my second keg. While trying to balance my system, I now have a fridge temp of 38/40 degrees, 3/16 line 7 1/2 feet long and a varied CO2 pressure from 8 to 14 pounds. I conditioned at 14 pounds and beleive the brew was slightly over carbed. It's a cream ale. I am now at 10 pounds and have been for a few days. What I have noticed is after a pour small air bubbles run up the beer line and accumulate at the shank. If some time passes between pours there may be air visible in the line near the shank, but I think the shank may have much more air in it. I'm sure that causes the foam, however, I don't know what causes the air to accumulate. Even tried to pour at 5 pounds, but had foam.

Is the moving air normal? Please help.

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Old 06-19-2006, 12:40 AM   #2
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I've noticed that my stouts and especially my cream stouts need to be dispensed at a pretty low psi (3-5) to not be overly 'heady'. I don't necessarily think that 14 psi was too high to carbonate with, but you didn't say how long you held that pressure. I force carbonate at between 20-30 psi depending on the style, but only overnight. From then on I let the keg sit at it's dispensing pressure for about a week and that seems to work good for me.

What you can do to help remedy this particular batch is reset your pressure to about 5 psi and let it sit for a few days, all the while "helping to relieve pressure" by having a few pints. This will help, trust me.

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Old 06-19-2006, 01:21 AM   #3
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Yes, having a few pints definitely relieves the pressure.

I don't keg, though.

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Old 06-19-2006, 02:34 AM   #4
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I find a few pints causes pressure. Maybe it's the diuretic in my blood pressure meds.

At that low a temperature, your ales will absorb a great deal of CO2. When they hit the warm tap, they foam. That's not air in the lines, it's CO2 coming out of solution as the line warms.

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Old 06-19-2006, 04:08 PM   #5
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when you adjusted the pressures, did you purge the keg? (pull the little metal thing at the top?)

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Old 06-22-2006, 12:30 AM   #6
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No I did not releive the pressure, however, the CO2 level is better since the brew tastes good again. There is no air/gas is the line any longer either. One thing I am doing is pouring into a frozen mug. Is that a problem?

What is the recommended storage/conditioning temp for ale? I prefer to consume at lower temps.

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