Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > What actually happens during bottle carbing?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 01-24-2013, 12:30 PM   #1
DHdriver
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Waterloo, ON
Posts: 48
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default What actually happens during bottle carbing?

I know the general science behind it, yeast turns sugar into CO2 building up pressure and dissolving in the beer.
I'm wondering why this takes 2 weeks (leaving aside conditioning/aging)? It seems like 4oz of corn sugar should be fermented out within 24-48hrs.
Now what happens? As CO2 is created does it rise to the top, fill the head space and dissolve from the top down, or once there is some pressure does it absorb/dissolve as it's created? And what kind of pressure do we see in a bottle during this? 12PSI set in a keg seems to carbonate within a week.

So who knows the science?
Thanks

__________________
DHdriver is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 12:34 PM   #2
ThickHead
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ThickHead's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 1,010
Liked 45 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHdriver View Post
I know the general science behind it, yeast turns sugar into CO2 building up pressure and dissolving in the beer.
I'm wondering why this takes 2 weeks (leaving aside conditioning/aging)? It seems like 4oz of corn sugar should be fermented out within 24-48hrs.
Now what happens? As CO2 is created does it rise to the top, fill the head space and dissolve from the top down, or once there is some pressure does it absorb/dissolve as it's created? And what kind of pressure do we see in a bottle during this? 12PSI set in a keg seems to carbonate within a week.

So who knows the science?
Thanks
The yeast eat up the sugar fairly quickly. However, it takes a while for the pressure to fully push the CO2 into solution. Even if you force carbonate using a keg it takes two weeks for this to happen at 12psi. Additionally, you want to wait for the yeast to fully flocculate after they have done their work and cleaned up after themselves.
__________________

Chad

"I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts, and beer."

-Abraham Lincoln

ThickHead is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 12:38 PM   #3
Jayhem
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Culpeper, VA
Posts: 2,567
Liked 256 Times on 207 Posts
Likes Given: 1163

Default

^Pretty much covered it right there. It's not just carbonating, it's also "conditioning" which is when the small amount of yeast left in the bottle start breaking down their own waste byproducts and then settle out in a fine layer on the bottom leaving your beer fairly clear and smooth tasting. This process takes time!

__________________

Next up: American Pale Ale
Primary 1&2: American Brown Ale
Primary 3&4: Hopped up Belgian Tripel
Bottle Conditioning/drinking: Summer Kolsch, White Zombie (Amarillo IPA), English Pale Ale (ESB)

Jayhem is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 12:41 PM   #4
TheBiGZ
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: MD
Posts: 109
Liked 13 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Also worth mentioning that CO2 is absorbed much faster if the beer is cold...as with force carbing.

__________________
TheBiGZ is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 12:49 PM   #5
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Malden, MA
Posts: 1,754
Liked 123 Times on 120 Posts
Likes Given: 57

Default

Nilo has an awesome blog post about this. He put a pressure gauge on a bottle and plotted the pressure over time.

http://beertech.blogspot.com/2009/12/carbonation-test.html

__________________

The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
BLOG: Brewing Boiled Down Brewing science for those of us without a Ph.D

WoodlandBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 12:55 PM   #6
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 6,121
Liked 553 Times on 402 Posts
Likes Given: 425

Default

Lots of information in this thread. Especially the last half.

__________________
Sent from my POS computer because I refuse to own a smartphone!
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbaysurfer View Post
That's the nature of being competitive. You find yourself wanting validation from more objective sources then your own ego.
AnOldUR is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-24-2013, 01:47 PM   #7
DHdriver
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Waterloo, ON
Posts: 48
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

That's much higher pressure then I would have expected

__________________
DHdriver is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle Carbing NickyD Bottling/Kegging 3 10-05-2010 06:19 AM
carbing each bottle breez7 Bottling/Kegging 1 07-12-2010 07:04 PM
Bottle carbing ? chromedome Cider Forum 6 09-09-2009 12:11 AM
Bottle carbing above 80F RodfatherX Bottling/Kegging 2 06-18-2008 11:27 PM
carbing bottle w/ DME ChrisS Bottling/Kegging 2 06-30-2007 06:19 PM