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Old 04-05-2013, 02:47 PM   #11
StoneHands
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If you don't mind getting your hands just a little dirty, I imagine this is very easily fixable, and very inexpensive to do so.

First, if you post your model number, I'm sure someone can chime in about being able to get the thing a little cooler. Usually there is a coarse adjustment screw (not easily found) on the thermostat that should allow you to drop your temp so that the actual fine adjustment knob that is easily accessible is useful to you in the temperature range that you want.

Second, beer line is very cheap. You should be able to replace a line for $3-$4 at the most. So if you can get to it, it would probably be worthwhile to replace it with longer lines if you're still having foam issues. The tower may make it really tough to get to if it's packed with insulation though, you'll have to get in there to see, or ask some other folks that have the same model - and certainly someone else on here does.

Lastly, 2.5 pounds isn't huge by any means, but should last quite a while and get you through quite a few kegs if you don't have any leaks (I use 20 oz paintball tanks - half of what you have - and get a couple of 5 gal kegs out of them easily). Once you decide how to go (replacing lines, adjusting temp, etc), I think you need to triple check that you don't have any leaks, all the way from the tank to the keg.

It's a bit of a hassle, but you can make your kegerator do what it's supposed to do. Try not to get too frustrated, it'll shake out eventually.

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Old 04-17-2013, 12:58 AM   #12
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yeah... other thing is check your kegerator placement. if you've backed it into too tight of a corner, the condensing coils won't be able to exchange enough heat, which in turn will limit how cold it can get. Keep in mind these things are built more like dorm room minifridges instead of decent full-sized refrigerators, so they're probably not well-designed. you might also want to check for leaks. if it's ShMIC like you claim, you might not have enough refrigerant in the lines. if you do want to extend the serve line, but you can't get into the tower, you can also buy some fittings at the homebrew store.

a few other questions:
1) what pressure are you serving at? in my experience serving beer at anything over 5-6 PSI gives way too much head.
2) how long after shaking did you serve? hard shaking like you described would actually force CO2 out of solution (think of it as shaking a soda can)

and one question for other respondents: i've never really seen anything about line length mentioned anywhere, at least in what i've seen so far. like the OP, my kegerator probably has ~5' lines. any suggestions?

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Old 04-17-2013, 05:11 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hendenburg2 View Post
a few other questions:
1) what pressure are you serving at? in my experience serving beer at anything over 5-6 PSI gives way too much head.
2) how long after shaking did you serve? hard shaking like you described would actually force CO2 out of solution (think of it as shaking a soda can)

and one question for other respondents: i've never really seen anything about line length mentioned anywhere, at least in what i've seen so far. like the OP, my kegerator probably has ~5' lines. any suggestions?
Over 5-6PSI is giving you too much head because your lines are too short. It was indeed stated above that the lines were too short to be balanced.

The general guidance is that 10ft lines are a safe length. Personally, I use 8ft lines, and I push 11psi at 40ish degrees. I occasionally have a slightly foamier than desired pour, and I'm pretty sure that if I had 9 or 10 foot lines that'd go away, but I'm generally happy with what I've got.
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