Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Too much foam

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-16-2012, 10:01 PM   #1
d_striker
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: CO Springs, CO
Posts: 310
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default Too much foam

Long time brewer, 2nd time kegger.

Everything went well on my first kegged batch of Brown Ale. Now that I've upped the CO2 volume on my IPA, I'm having foam issues.

My carb target is 2.8 volumes at 42 degrees which puts my pressure at 17PSI. Using 3/16" ID vinyl tubing, I need at least 5.3 feet to balance my system. I'm using 10ft and I'm still getting lots of foam.

How do I reduce my foam?

__________________
d_striker is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-16-2012, 10:03 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,769
Liked 4378 Times on 3185 Posts
Likes Given: 854

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by d_striker View Post
Long time brewer, 2nd time kegger.

Everything went well on my first kegged batch of Brown Ale. Now that I've upped the CO2 volume on my IPA, I'm having foam issues.

My carb target is 2.8 volumes at 42 degrees which puts my pressure at 17PSI. Using 3/16" ID vinyl tubing, I need at least 5.3 feet to balance my system. I'm using 10ft and I'm still getting lots of foam.

How do I reduce my foam?
You shouldn't have foam with 10', but definitely the calculation of 5.3 feet is wrong.

In my 40 degree kegerator, I get some foam if I go over 13 psi, though, even with 10' lines. You could try 15' lines, and that will get rid of the foam. I needed 30' lines for soda, at 30 psi.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-17-2012, 12:05 AM   #3
d_striker
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: CO Springs, CO
Posts: 310
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

I used the calculation on this page:

http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/07/14/keg-line-length-balancing-the-science-of-draft-beer/

L = (keg_pressure – 1 psi) / Resistance
So starting with our example of 12 psi keg pressure, and some typical 3/16″ vinyl keg tubing (which loses 3 lb/ft) we get L= (12-1)/3 which is 3.66 feet. So a 12 psi kegging system would provide 1 psi of pressure at the tap with 3.66 feet of tubing.


What's the proper equation?

__________________
d_striker is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-17-2012, 06:47 AM   #4
JuanMoore
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JuanMoore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Old Pueblo
Posts: 16,232
Liked 3212 Times on 3115 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Trying to serve a 2.8 vol beer at 42° is going to be a challenge. You're going to need pretty long lines to slow the beer way down, since the CO2 is really going to want to escape as soon as it's at atmospheric pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by d_striker View Post
I used the calculation on this page:

http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/07/14/keg-line-length-balancing-the-science-of-draft-beer/

L = (keg_pressure – 1 psi) / Resistance
So starting with our example of 12 psi keg pressure, and some typical 3/16″ vinyl keg tubing (which loses 3 lb/ft) we get L= (12-1)/3 which is 3.66 feet. So a 12 psi kegging system would provide 1 psi of pressure at the tap with 3.66 feet of tubing.


What's the proper equation?
That is the "proper" equation, but that doesn't mean it's safe to use for everyone. It calculates the MINIMUM length that can be used without creating a foamy mess under assumed ideal conditions. Your actual conditions or idea of ideal conditions may be much different.

If you serve your beer a little warmer than the commercial industry standard of ~36-38° (like most of us homebrewers do), then you'll need longer lines to slow the pour down a little and keep the CO2 in solution. If you want to carb your beer over ~2.7 vol, you'll also need longer lines to keep the CO2 in solution. There's also a lot of variance in the actual resistance of the line between manufacturers or even between batches. The equation also assumes that the line resistance is a constant, when it's actually variable depending on the beer velocity. Sharp shoulders, restrictions, or expansions in the area the beer flows through from fittings and shanks that aren't ideally sized or designed can also knock CO2 out of solution, and longer lines help prevent this.

The only side effect of longer lines is a slightly slower pour. It's also much easier to trim lines that are a little too long than it is to get short lines to grow longer. There are a lot of variables involved, so calculating the shortest possible length that won't create foam isn't easy. Since extra long lines compensate for less than ideal real world conditions without any negative side effects, why not use them instead of trying to calculate and use the bare minimum length?
__________________
Keezer Soze

Yuri rubs it out with 60 grit... wouldn't even feel a tenga egg. -Randar

, place entry ox dixla to suck. Fcxk fwnpoo and passed. Hel an my spupid ass. OK. - TXCrash
JuanMoore is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-18-2012, 07:20 PM   #5
BrewLou
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Holly Springs, NC
Posts: 120
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by d_striker View Post
I used the calculation on this page:

http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/07/14/keg-line-length-balancing-the-science-of-draft-beer/

L = (keg_pressure – 1 psi) / Resistance
So starting with our example of 12 psi keg pressure, and some typical 3/16″ vinyl keg tubing (which loses 3 lb/ft) we get L= (12-1)/3 which is 3.66 feet. So a 12 psi kegging system would provide 1 psi of pressure at the tap with 3.66 feet of tubing.


What's the proper equation?
As the above stated, that equation is fine (and the one I used for my setup.) I understand the reasoning people use to just throw line at these keg systems, but there can be other factors to look into before buyin 50' of line .

A few things to check...

1. Did you make sure the O-ring at the beer post was in good condition after you cleaned from your previous batch? That fitting can get messed up and cause foam issues.

2. Has your temperature changed? If your temp has dropped a bit and you have slushy beer you will get foam that way as well.
__________________

Primary 1 & 2: Watermelon Wheat!
2ndary 1: Empty
2ndary 2: Empty
Bottled/Kegged: Saison & Pilsner

BrewLou is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-18-2012, 07:42 PM   #6
d_striker
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: CO Springs, CO
Posts: 310
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewLou View Post
As the above stated, that equation is fine (and the one I used for my setup.) I understand the reasoning people use to just throw line at these keg systems, but there can be other factors to look into before buyin 50' of line .

A few things to check...

1. Did you make sure the O-ring at the beer post was in good condition after you cleaned from your previous batch? That fitting can get messed up and cause foam issues.

2. Has your temperature changed? If your temp has dropped a bit and you have slushy beer you will get foam that way as well.
1.) I didn't disassemble the post between batches but it's on my to do list as yooper told me to do so in a different thread. I think you could be on to something, though, as the valve button in the post will stick open slightly and shoot beer up when I remove the pin lock fitting. I thought that maybe it was solidified sugars or something.

2.). The temp has been stable and well above freezing.
__________________
d_striker is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
My first glass of beer from my kegged batch... all foam. The second? all foam. 3rd? nerdlogic Bottling/Kegging 24 11-15-2012 02:14 PM
95% foam out of "foam free tubing" biohaz7331 Bottling/Kegging 15 09-10-2012 11:30 PM
too much foam fl93 Bottling/Kegging 13 02-08-2011 05:05 PM
Haier kegerator conversion - foam baby foam... lilzaphod Bottling/Kegging 5 10-08-2008 04:22 PM
Foam, foam, foam - any ideas? FlyGuy Bottling/Kegging 17 03-23-2007 01:50 AM