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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Tapping and pressurizing a Store bought keg?
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Old 02-02-2012, 01:55 AM   #1
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Default Tapping and pressurizing a Store bought keg?

I know everyone is bias to home brew. I do plan on home brewing after i upgrade. But the little woman drinks Bud lite and I have to get this straight first.
I had a kegerator 20 years ago and just rebuilt it and was lost on how to tap it. <I know how to tap it, but adding the co2 is the hard part>

I searched and found this from chuggs:

1) Let the keg settle a while, and get it nice and iced down.

2) Find a volunteer (never had a shortage of these at a kegger)

3) Now connect your Sankey Coupler and pull the split ring on the pressure relief valve...and let most all of the CO2 out...but not completely.

4) Set your regulator down to 0 psi...but have a screwdriver on it ready to go.

5) Now, give your volunteer a really big mug, or a pitcher and have them start pouring a beer.

6) Watch the flow, as you dial up the PSI on your CO2 regulator. When the pour flows smoothly...you're set.

7) Important!! When you're done serving...Be sure to dail up the CO2 pressure in the keg to 12-14 psi to keep your beer from going flat. Then disconnect the Sankey Coupler.

***
1. Is the Coupler the Tap? If so I have a D System for North American Beers

2. My question is on number 7:
I don't have a sankey coupler and does this matter I have a standered D System. so the pressures always on. If i dial up the pressure in the end... why am i adjusting it to a good beer flow? why not just set it at 12-14?

3. Whats the difference between a sankey and a D system?

4. 24 hours after tapping it's still mostly head. Although Ive only poured about 6 mugs of it so far. The lady at the bar said just run it for 3 minuets till it runs clear then your good. I don't really want to waste all that beer. Will it calm down on its own?

Thanks

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Old 02-02-2012, 02:51 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20GT View Post
I know everyone is bias to home brew. I do plan on home brewing after i upgrade. But the little woman drinks Bud lite and I have to get this straight first.
I had a kegerator 20 years ago and just rebuilt it and was lost on how to tap it. <I know how to tap it, but adding the co2 is the hard part>

I searched and found this from chuggs:

1) Let the keg settle a while, and get it nice and iced down.

2) Find a volunteer (never had a shortage of these at a kegger)

3) Now connect your Sankey Coupler and pull the split ring on the pressure relief valve...and let most all of the CO2 out...but not completely.

4) Set your regulator down to 0 psi...but have a screwdriver on it ready to go.

5) Now, give your volunteer a really big mug, or a pitcher and have them start pouring a beer.

6) Watch the flow, as you dial up the PSI on your CO2 regulator. When the pour flows smoothly...you're set.

7) Important!! When you're done serving...Be sure to dail up the CO2 pressure in the keg to 12-14 psi to keep your beer from going flat. Then disconnect the Sankey Coupler.

***
1. Is the Coupler the Tap? If so I have a D System for North American Beers

2. My question is on number 7:
I don't have a sankey coupler and does this matter I have a standered D System. so the pressures always on. If i dial up the pressure in the end... why am i adjusting it to a good beer flow? why not just set it at 12-14?

3. Whats the difference between a sankey and a D system?

4. 24 hours after tapping it's still mostly head. Although Ive only poured about 6 mugs of it so far. The lady at the bar said just run it for 3 minuets till it runs clear then your good. I don't really want to waste all that beer. Will it calm down on its own?

Thanks
See if I can help you:
1. The coupler is the D System connection to the keg itself. The tap connects to it.

2. Sounds like you have what you need to connect to the keg. The coupler should have a pressure relief value. The keg is already carbonated so you need to adjust the co2 pressure to get the right pour.

3. They are the same. Did a quick search for a picture: http://www.homebrewing.org/American-...ler_p_764.html

4. This part I'm not sure why but that's what I was told to do when I got a few kegs for a party.

Hope I am right on these, I am sure someone will correct me if not. Good luck.
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Old 02-02-2012, 08:36 AM   #3
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Thanks for the reply
now i just have to figure out questions 2.5 and 4.

Also on your #4 you were told to run it clear? if so, that's cool because that would mean eventually it will settle on its own once i run it clear after 50 mugs or so
(it's just me and my wife so it might take awhile, just didn't want to waste all that beer)

2. If i dial up the pressure in the end... why am i adjusting it to a good beer flow?
why not just set it at 12-14?

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Old 02-02-2012, 02:42 PM   #4
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In theory, if you balanced your system, you should be setting it at 12-14 so it doesn't go flat AND you have perfect pours. To do this, add beer line length. That ups the resistance and slows the flow so that you have smooth pours.

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Old 02-03-2012, 12:11 AM   #5
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Thanks for the reply Brewnoob. I'll try it.
I got about 4 feet in line, how much should I add?

We've only had about 15 mugs out of it so I might be rushing things

in theory wouldn't the extra resistance/friction cause more foam. lol

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Old 02-03-2012, 10:45 AM   #6
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Thanks for the reply Brewnoob. I'll try it.
I got about 4 feet in line, how much should I add?

We've only had about 15 mugs out of it so I might be rushing things

in theory wouldn't the extra resistance/friction cause more foam. lol
Most folks around here are using 10' 3/16" line. The longer the line the slower the poor the less foam you have. So if you want to play around go ahead and get about 20' of line and trim it down little by little till you get the poor you want.
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Old 02-03-2012, 01:39 PM   #7
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I'm doing this tonight with my keezer until my beer is in production.

Although I am counter-pressure transfering it to another keg because I don't plan on attempting to get my friends to help me lift it over the collar of the keezer.

Once transfered using sanke taps, I plan to just pressurize 10-12 psi and leave it hooked up like I would a normal keg. I'll play around with the settings to see what I need, but I'm just going to use a simple picnic tap on the beer out port. (faucet not installed yet)

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Old 02-03-2012, 02:01 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20GT View Post
Thanks for the reply Brewnoob. I'll try it.
I got about 4 feet in line, how much should I add?

We've only had about 15 mugs out of it so I might be rushing things

in theory wouldn't the extra resistance/friction cause more foam. lol
There are articles out there that have the scientific reasoning behind this. I'll give you the dumbed down cliff note version. If you are pressurizing to 12psi for example, you don't want 12psi exiting the faucet. That will cause a bunch of turbulence and "knock" co2 out of suspension causing foam and flat beer. Adding resistance (easiest is longer beer lines) to the line is reducing that pressure over the length of the beer line. Ideally, if memory serves correctly, you need about 0-1psi exiting the faucet. The math behind 3/16 is roughly 2psi drop per foot of line. So, technically, you SHOULD only need about 6 feet of 3/16 to drop 12 to an ideal level. However, a lot of people, including myself, find that 4-6 is still a bit short causing foaming issues. The magic number seems to be about 10' of 3/16. You can always trim it down if it's too long. What I've noticed with 10' is slightly slower pours but perfect head with no foaming issues each and every time.
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Old 02-10-2012, 12:19 AM   #9
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Hmmm... guys I got 20' feet today. still getting foamy beer(posted pics) soapy beer foam, tastes kinda flat now. any sugestions

system.jpg   head.jpg   soapybeer.jpg  
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Old 02-10-2012, 08:18 AM   #10
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i think the soapy foam is a tell tail sign. I'll try cleaning my new beer line tomorrow. who knows what the used at the factory. I'll also get a thermometer tomorrow. I think my firige is very cold, maybe its absorbing to much co2.

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