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Old 08-09-2011, 12:16 AM   #1
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Default Serving line length question

So I've researched a little bit on the subject, as I was running only a foot of line and getting (as you would imagine) a cup full of foam when serving from my kegs. I've since gotten 3/16" ID lines and have just hooked up a 10' section to my pale ale keg currently set at 13psi. I'm still getting a cup full of foam. I feel like I'm missing something somewhere?

Anyways, I'll look into some LHBS advice, but it seems to vary between each one (there's 2 in my area). Thought I could get a 3rd opinion here to sort of act as a tiebreaker, providing it matches with one of their suggestions

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Old 08-09-2011, 01:18 AM   #2
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Vent the keg and try serving at lower pressure. Sounds to me like your beer is over presurised if you are getting that much foam at 13psi w/ 10 feet of 3/16. 13psi sounds a bit high if the beer is very cold?

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Old 08-09-2011, 01:21 AM   #3
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I would think too much pressure, too.

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Old 08-09-2011, 02:15 AM   #4
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13psi is a little on the high side, so you may need even longer than 10'. We really need more info to be able to properly diagnose what the issue is though. How did you carbonate the beer? What temp is the beer kept at? Where are the beverage lines run, and are they kept cold the enitre run? Is just the first pour foamy, or every pour? Are there any kinks in the beverage line?

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Old 08-09-2011, 02:57 AM   #5
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Okay, checking back here. So I'm running all line inside of the keezer (which is kept at 35 degrees F) to picnic taps for now, and I've since turned the pale ale down to 11psi. No kinks in the lines either

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Old 08-09-2011, 03:28 AM   #6
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How did you carbonate the beer? Unless you used the set and forget method, it's possible that it's just overcarbonated. FWIW 13psi at 35F is almost 3 volumes, so even if it's properly carbonated you'll probably need longer than 10' lines for a perfect pour. It could also be hop debris or something stuck in the faucet, or even a faulty picnic faucet. Do you have a second picnic faucet you can try?

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Old 08-09-2011, 03:40 AM   #7
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I'll give a lower psi a try first. I used the set and forget method (which I was suggested was 13psi @ 37 degrees F). A faulty picnic tap could be the case, but wouldn't that pretty much guarantee a leak out of the tap while not being used? A significant amount of gas does find its way to the head of the line after pouring is done, but no leaking. Could that be a sign of anything?

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Old 08-09-2011, 03:58 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebj5883 View Post
A faulty picnic tap could be the case, but wouldn't that pretty much guarantee a leak out of the tap while not being used?
No. It could just be a small protrusion inside from the molding process creating turbulence and knocking the co2 out of solution. You are openeing the faucet completely when you pour right?


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Originally Posted by ebj5883 View Post
A significant amount of gas does find its way to the head of the line after pouring is done, but no leaking. Could that be a sign of anything?
Yes. There shouldn't be much co2 coming out of solution unless it's overcarbed. Hard to say what the issue is that's causing it. Maybe someone else can chime in.
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Old 08-09-2011, 04:04 AM   #9
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it's overcarbed. Solution:

Unhook gas
Vent pressure
shake keg
vent pressure
repeat for more times than you think is necessary
hook back up to gas at 10psi
try a pour after a few days

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Old 08-09-2011, 10:30 PM   #10
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Also, what is the OD of the beerline you are using?

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