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Old 03-15-2008, 08:46 PM   #1
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Default Sediment in bottles

I am quite new to home brewing but i have read a couple books on it. I understand that sediment is almost inevitable when bottling bitter. i was wondering if there are any ways you can reduce the residue. can you condition it in a cask for a couple of weeks and allow to clear before bottling, will this ruin the carbonation when bottling, and help would be much appreciated, cheers

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Old 03-15-2008, 09:04 PM   #2
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Most people leave it in the secondary for a few weeks up to a few months to let it clear. It won't hurt anything because there will still be some yeast left in suspension. However when you introduce more sugar at bottling that's where the sediment comes from. You can't really avoid it when carbonating naturally.

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Old 03-15-2008, 09:30 PM   #3
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Yes, if you're using a clearing vessel/tank (a "secondary"), that will help to ensure that you have less sediment in your bottles especially if you leave it for about a month or so. Also, you can choose a more flocculant yeast, because it will compact tightly in the grainbed, giving you less in suspension. Also, if you use a flocculant yeast, it'll compact tightly in the bottle, so it's easier to pour off of the sediment without disturbing it.

You do get really good at pouring, though, trust me! I can pour a homebrew and leave just about 1/4 inch in the bottle, and get beautiful clear beer with no yeast in it. I bet the vast majority of us on here can do that!

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Old 03-15-2008, 10:12 PM   #4
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thanks, thats a real help. ill try a different yeast next time. i can pour most of the clear ale off. but i want to know if you can bottle it without leaving any sediment. When you buy real ale in the shops it has no layer of sediment, is there a way of achieving this through home brewing? Sorry if this seems like a really stupid question!

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Old 03-15-2008, 10:51 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcarnell@hotmail.com
thanks, thats a real help. ill try a different yeast next time. i can pour most of the clear ale off. but i want to know if you can bottle it without leaving any sediment. When you buy real ale in the shops it has no layer of sediment, is there a way of achieving this through home brewing? Sorry if this seems like a really stupid question!
Commercial brews filter their beer and force carb it. The upside is that you don't have sediment but the downside is that it's dead beer. Commercial bottle conditioned beer has the sediment in it too.

There is not really an effective way to do it with bottled homebrew but homebrew with live yeast is better for you.
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Old 03-15-2008, 11:28 PM   #6
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If you want to bottle without sediment, then I suggest you look into getting into kegging.

That way you can bottle pre-carbonated beer from the keg, and you don't have to worry about sediment. I know it's an expensive and somewhat complicated route (but not that complicated), but it's about the only way you completely eliminate yeast sediment in bottles.

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Old 03-15-2008, 11:37 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brett
If you want to bottle without sediment, then I suggest you look into getting into kegging.

That way you can bottle pre-carbonated beer from the keg, and you don't have to worry about sediment. I know it's an expensive and somewhat complicated route (but not that complicated), but it's about the only way you completely eliminate yeast sediment in bottles.
Yep force carb + beer gun (or similar device as you can DIY).
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Old 03-15-2008, 11:46 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcarnell@hotmail.com
thanks, thats a real help. ill try a different yeast next time. i can pour most of the clear ale off. but i want to know if you can bottle it without leaving any sediment. When you buy real ale in the shops it has no layer of sediment, is there a way of achieving this through home brewing? Sorry if this seems like a really stupid question!
If you're going for "real ale", your best bet is to get a kegging system and keg condition. Unfortunately, most of us lose the "real ale" distinction even when we cask condition because, without an expensive beer engine, homebrew kegs have to serve under bottled CO2 pressure.

Bottled "real ale" has to be bottle-conditioned, which means there will be a layer of sediment. With a flocculant yeast, however, as well as a couple weeks in the bright tank and low priming, this sediment can be vastly reduced (to the point where some bottled real ales seem to have none, esp when it's well compacted in the bottle).
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Old 03-16-2008, 01:21 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcarnell@hotmail.com
thanks, thats a real help. ill try a different yeast next time. i can pour most of the clear ale off. but i want to know if you can bottle it without leaving any sediment. When you buy real ale in the shops it has no layer of sediment, is there a way of achieving this through home brewing? Sorry if this seems like a really stupid question!
just FYI, you can buy 'real ale' in some shops that does have sediment. its less common, but its true.

don't let the sediment bother you. good beer should never be drank from the bottle anyways, and pouring to avoid the sediment is quite easy. just warn anyone you give homebrew to...advise them on how long to chill (48 hours), to pour slowly, and to sacrifice the last 1/4" to the beer gods.
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Old 03-17-2008, 12:36 AM   #10
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Default Sediment

Sierra Nevada has some sediment, I love that beer.

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