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Netflyer 12-10-2012 07:14 AM

Rushing a beer
 
Ok, I needed to brew a beer by Christmas Eve and I brewed a blonde ale that should be drank young and left myself 23 days... so today, after 9 days I racked from fermenter to corny keg and put the gas on. I typically wait 21 days before I open the fermenter and here the S.-05 was not entirely dropped after 9 days and I'm used to seeing pretty clear product down to the yeast cake.
So my question is considering I have until the 24th, is this the right way to rush this beer cause I usually slow carbonate for 2 weeks, or should I let it sit another week and then rush the carbonation for 1 week? Will it mature enough with gas on at 45 after 9 days of fermentation at 65? It is meant to be drank in 21 days easy but I'm just not sure I'm rushing it right. Thanks for help!

:mug:

RmikeVT 12-10-2012 07:38 AM

Hows it taste? I find that I can go grain to glass in 10 to 14 days if I use a flocculent yeast, I prefer Nottingham in these situations, low sixties, under 1.050 and a simple grain bill. I add gelatin when I keg to help everything drop out.

BadNewsBrewery 12-10-2012 11:46 AM

I would vote to rush the carb over the fermentation - a slightly undercarbonated beer that is clear and delicious is better than a well carbonated beer with floaties and odd flavors, IMHO. :mug:

Netflyer 12-10-2012 06:14 PM

Tastes ok, a bit bready, I used safeale -05 for this batch and it mostly floccualted... I siphoned between any floaties and the yeast cake so now it is at 45 with the gas on it... I could rack it back out into a fermenter and let it sit another week and then just rush the carbonation... hmmm might have a better chance that way... just wasn't sure of the best way to rush it was...oh it it's a really light bill, just 1.045 OG I should also mention here the measured finished gravity after 9 days of ferm. was 1.007 so I'm pretty sure she's done... so perhaps just throw some geletin in the corny. If I do that do I rack it into another corny before serving or will the solid stuff stay out of the dispense tube?

giligson 12-10-2012 06:46 PM

If you feel it tastes OK then its done. I would be concerned about Acetaldehyde and diacetyl. Even when the gravity is down, active yeast are still "cleaning up" some residual products. I would consider leaving the corny unpressurized at room temp for another week then rush the carbonation (you can shake a few times at high PSI then let rest at your equilibrium pressure for a week and should still get a good carb level.

stpug 12-10-2012 06:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by giligson (Post 4668742)
I... I would consider leaving the corny unpressurized at room temp for another week then rush the carbonation (you can shake a few times at high PSI then let rest at your equilibrium pressure for a week and should still get a good carb level.

Not totally unpressurized in the corny, otherwise you're somewhat exposed to the atmosphere. You could hit it with 12-20 PSI enough to seal the lid and then remove from co2 for the conditioning time. BUT, if you think it tastes good then there's nothing wrong with getting it on gas in the fridge right now. I think it will condition much slower but will still condition over time, and anything that remains after christmas will just be given a chance to become better :D

BadNewsBrewery 12-10-2012 07:27 PM

If you've already put it in the keg, don't bother transferring it - just adding headache. Let it sit at normal PSI then cold-crash in your fridge before serving - your first pint or two may be a bit gross from the cold break but it should all get out pretty quick.

giligson 12-10-2012 08:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stpug (Post 4668774)
Not totally unpressurized in the corny, otherwise you're somewhat exposed to the atmosphere. :D

Yes, that's what I would do - didn't specify sealing pressure required.

Bobby_M 12-10-2012 08:53 PM

In the future, if you really need to hurry, pitch twice as much yeast. When you reach a reasonable final gravity, get the carboy down to about 33F and let it settle out. I've found that US-04 is about the best flocculator out there. Carbonating can be done in a day so it's better to let it ferment out and settle clear before it gets to the keg. That ship has sailed. Elevate the keg pressure 5 psi over the target pressure on the charts and check it every couple days.

daksin 12-10-2012 10:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bobby_M (Post 4669202)
In the future, if you really need to hurry, pitch twice as much yeast. When you reach a reasonable final gravity, get the carboy down to about 33F and let it settle out. I've found that US-04 is about the best flocculator out there. Carbonating can be done in a day so it's better to let it ferment out and settle clear before it gets to the keg. That ship has sailed. Elevate the keg pressure 5 psi over the target pressure on the charts and check it every couple days.

My preferred method is to pitch the right number of yeast and ferment with pure O2 and extremely tight temp control. That way, my beer is drinkable as soon as it hits FG, with a day or two for most of the yeast to drop out. Then I can rack it into a keg with some gelatin to clear it more completely, let it set for a couple days on gas in the cold, then clean transfer under pressure to an empty keg so I have zero sediment in the serving keg. Then I can force carb as needed. I did ~20 gallons of beer this way 1.5 weeks before our kickstarter launch party. Everything came out exactly as intended, same as any other ferm schedule.

OP- if you have an empty keg, that's what I'd do with the beer you have now. Make up some gelatin and add it to your cold keg now. Let that sit for 2-3 days and then transfer under pressure to the new keg. Then you can force carb to your desired level. That way you can move the serving keg around without worrying about sediment clouding up your beer. Sharing beer at the holidays means a lot of folks not entirely used to craft/homebrewed beer, so any cloudiness is going to raise eyebrows. I like sparkling clear beer myself, and it really helps for the uninitiated.


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