Kegconnection Complete Starter Kit and More Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > "Real Ale" in a Wine Bottle?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-29-2010, 03:23 PM   #1
Sky7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 37
Default "Real Ale" in a Wine Bottle?

I was feeling a little frisky the last time I was brewing, and decided to depart from my normal routine.

After primary, I decided to fill up a wine bottle (and then cork it!) with my beer, with the uneducated intention of making "cask ale", or "real ale".

So... 3 months have gone by, and it has cleared and settled nicely. But what exactly do I have here? I added nothing to carbonate it further than whatever lingering fermentation might have been going on after primary.

Obviously, this isn't in a "cask", although it is in a wine bottle. Is it simply a "bottle-conditioned" real ale?

It appears as though I satisfied the below, which comes from the cask homebrewing wiki. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/wiki/index.php/Casks

The beer itself is a glorious 8% American Ale. I suspect that it will essentially be a flatter version of itself? Any thoughts would be appreciated!

Quote:
"Natural Carbonation

The unfiltered, unpasteurised beer still contains live yeast, which continues conditioning the beer in the cask (known as 'secondary fermentation'); this process creates a gentle, natural CO2 carbonation and allows malt and hop flavours to develop, resulting in a richer tasting drink with more character than standard keg ('brewery-conditioned') beers.

Real ale is always served without any extraneous gas, usually by manually pulling it up from the cellar with a handpump (also known as a 'beer engine'). This is the traditional way of brewing and serving beer; only a few decades ago did filtered, pasteurised, chilled beer served by gas become normal.

The only place in the world where cask-conditioned beer is still commonly available is Britain. "
__________________

Keg: Restatement Oktoberfest
On Deck: Restatement Standard

Restatement Brewing Co. Weblog!

Sky7 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 03:34 PM   #2
weirdboy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,929
Liked 426 Times on 347 Posts
Likes Given: 58

Default

Yes you pretty much have a real ale according to CAMRA. Obviously, it's not cask-conditioned because you bottled it.

For future reference you should use champagne (or beer) bottles if you're going to do this, even if you don't prime the bottles. Champagne bottles are designed to be pressurized, and wine bottles are not.


The key to getting consistent, good carbonation naturally is closely monitoring the fermentation process and packaging at the right time. And having a brewing process that produces the same starting and final gravities consistently.

__________________
weirdboy is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 03:35 PM   #3
dwarven_stout
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 1,629
Liked 34 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

If you bottled it after primary, it'll just be a flat beer. If it's not flat, then you aren't primarying for long enough.

__________________

"I can't believe how many people think Air Lock is pronounced Hydrometer." -BigKahuna
"If you gave me a beer with placenta in it without telling me I would kick you in the nuts." -ODaniel
"We be in a big hurry for dope beer with much alcamahol and flavor, quality, balance, and aroma don't matter. We just wantz to be druck, u know?" -Yooper

dwarven_stout is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 03:38 PM   #4
remilard
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 3,655
Liked 38 Times on 37 Posts

Default

Every bottled conditioned beer is real ale. You can add sugar to prime and still have real ale.

__________________
remilard is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 03:42 PM   #5
Sky7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 37
Default

Thanks for the responses. A couple of thoughts/questions:

As the wiki says, casks these days are steel. So, I presume that the naming distinction regarding "cask" ales likely doesn't rest on subtle overtones obtained from oak wood, but is perhaps a result of the quantity of beer being conditioned at once?

Secondly (for Dwarven), my sense is that it was pretty much done fermenting when I put it in the wine bottle. Are you implying that for true "real ale" I should have taken it out sooner?

__________________

Keg: Restatement Oktoberfest
On Deck: Restatement Standard

Restatement Brewing Co. Weblog!

Sky7 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 05:35 PM   #6
dwarven_stout
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 1,629
Liked 34 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sky7 View Post
Secondly (for Dwarven), my sense is that it was pretty much done fermenting when I put it in the wine bottle. Are you implying that for true "real ale" I should have taken it out sooner?
No, not at all. As remilard points out, you could have added sugar to it if you'd wanted and still had "real ale"- all that really matters is that it's on the yeast.

What I was saying is that if it wasn't flat or close to it, then you're racking from your fermenter before it's done and should let it go a while longer.
__________________

"I can't believe how many people think Air Lock is pronounced Hydrometer." -BigKahuna
"If you gave me a beer with placenta in it without telling me I would kick you in the nuts." -ODaniel
"We be in a big hurry for dope beer with much alcamahol and flavor, quality, balance, and aroma don't matter. We just wantz to be druck, u know?" -Yooper

dwarven_stout is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 05:40 PM   #7
weirdboy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 3 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,929
Liked 426 Times on 347 Posts
Likes Given: 58

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwarven_stout View Post
No, not at all. As remilard points out, you could have added sugar to it if you'd wanted and still had "real ale"- all that really matters is that it's on the yeast.

What I was saying is that if it wasn't flat or close to it, then you're racking from your fermenter before it's done and should let it go a while longer.
Huh? It's a pretty common practice to package when there's still a bit of fermentation (2-3 points) left to go so that the beer naturally carbonates.
__________________
weirdboy is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-29-2010, 06:03 PM   #8
dwarven_stout
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 1,629
Liked 34 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weirdboy View Post
Huh? It's a pretty common practice to package when there's still a bit of fermentation (2-3 points) left to go so that the beer naturally carbonates.
Commercially maybe, but you won't see advice like that very frequently among homebrewers. Which is what we are, after all.
__________________

"I can't believe how many people think Air Lock is pronounced Hydrometer." -BigKahuna
"If you gave me a beer with placenta in it without telling me I would kick you in the nuts." -ODaniel
"We be in a big hurry for dope beer with much alcamahol and flavor, quality, balance, and aroma don't matter. We just wantz to be druck, u know?" -Yooper

dwarven_stout is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2011, 02:17 PM   #9
Ocracok3lite
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Ocracoke Island, NC
Posts: 7
Default

SO I am kegging this weekend but will have a few gallons extra and was planning to put these in wine bottles. Hoe much sugar would you suggest for a wine bottle.

__________________
Ocracok3lite is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 01-28-2011, 02:58 PM   #10
a10t2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Leadville, CO
Posts: 557
Liked 14 Times on 13 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ocracok3lite View Post
SO I am kegging this weekend but will have a few gallons extra and was planning to put these in wine bottles. Hoe much sugar would you suggest for a wine bottle.
None. Wine bottles (unless they're sparkling wine bottles) aren't designed to be pressurized. Putting sugar in could result in exploding bottles.
__________________
http://seanterrill.com/category/brewing/
Quote:
Originally Posted by monty3777 View Post
squeeze your sack like it owes you money.
a10t2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bottle "Frost" - What is it? Grizzlybrew Bottling/Kegging 6 01-13-2010 02:50 AM
Bottling beer in 2 liter "Diet Coke" or "Diet Pepsi" bottles theguy Bottling/Kegging 5 06-24-2009 06:25 PM
Would two cornies fit inside this: 32"H X 20.5"W X 20.5"D? polamalu43 Bottling/Kegging 5 05-30-2008 07:04 PM
"THE BEAUTY Of THE BOTTLE" cheezydemon Bottling/Kegging 42 05-23-2008 12:43 PM
My First "real Kegging session" Orfy Bottling/Kegging 4 12-07-2006 05:57 PM