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Old 12-07-2012, 08:06 PM   #1
MikeyM
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Default Quick keg natural carb question

Hi guys, happy HoHos.

I have 5 gallons of a 6.9% IPA in a keg and used 3/4 cup of corn sugar for priming. It's been in the keg about 2 weeks and the keg has ALOT of pressure but so far the beer is not carb'd. I drew a little out to try it and it has lots of foam due to the pressure but no carbonation. Should I just wait longer? Do anything different? Normally all my beers have had decent carbonation by 2 weeks time when I have bottled them.

Thanks a bunch!

Mikey

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Old 12-07-2012, 08:17 PM   #2
stpug
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Warm beer tends to come out more foamy and less carbonated than it's chilled counterpart. If you chilled the whole keg for several days it would absorb and maintain the carbonation in the liquid much better. Than again, maybe I'm not understanding the problem clearly enough.

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Old 12-07-2012, 08:20 PM   #3
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Is the keg cold when you take the sample (I'm assuming not since you're naturally carbing)? If not, the pressure is a lot higher at room temp and the CO2 won't be in solution, giving you a foamy pour. How long is your beer line?
Cold keg, 6'-8' beer line, it should be a lot better. If you have a way to check the pressure in the keg, a gauge, 30 psi at room temp is pretty good.

That being said, in your case, 2 weeks, it may be done or it may need more time. I use a bleeder valve whenever I naturally carb in a keg. I can monitor the pressure buildup, bleed off any over 30 psi at room temp, and wait until it stabilizes to know it's done.

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Old 12-07-2012, 08:50 PM   #4
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Ah hah! Thanks. The beer line is right about 6'. So I don't have a way of checking pressure but maybe I should let it sit for another week and then stick it in the fridge for 3-5 days? How long does it normally take for CO2 to absorb into the brew under cold conditions?

Thanks again!

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Old 12-07-2012, 08:53 PM   #5
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Sounds good on your plan. Let it sit one more week, then in the fridge for a few days. I don't really know how long it would take to absorb, but a few days at a minimum I would think (I always start "sampling" right away). After it chills overnight and is cold, hook it to the gas and check it after a day or two.

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