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Old 06-13-2010, 04:13 AM   #1
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Default Questions on building 1st kegerator

I am getting ready to make my first conversion of a normal size fridge into a kegerator and have a few questions:

1. Should I have the CO2 tank inside or outside the refrigerator? Are there advantages/disadvantages to either placement? I have a used 20 lb tank and if I have it inside I will only have room for 2 kegs. If I place it outside I will have room for three corneys. I would be able to use a 5 lb canister inside the refrigerator.

2. If I want to drill tap lines should I drill these through the door or through the side of the refrigerator? Are there advantages/disadvantages to either placement?

3. Is there an inner diameter of hose and length that will work the best for kegerators?

4. Are there things you wished you would have either known or done differently when you think back to building your first kegerator?

Thanks for any input you have to share.

Mick

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Old 06-13-2010, 04:23 AM   #2
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1) There is no difference from what I have seen. However, the local CO2 salesman told me that I will get better usage of my CO2 if its outside of the fridge. However, I have not ran into this.

2) Drilling into the side of a fridge is risky business. There are coolant lines running inside those walls that you must avoid. The best bet is to get a manual online and locate those coolant lines. Either that or do what my friend did and drill with a 1/16" drill bit first, to make sure you miss the lines, the drill with the larger bit.

3) I use 3/16" lines, if I add some resistance, via these: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/cure...oubles-100151/ I have no troubles, otherwise go with about 8' of hose.

4) I wish I wouldn't have done so much damn research prior to jumping in... I'm kinda anal!

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Old 06-13-2010, 02:05 PM   #3
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If the CO2 tank is external then will I have to drill 3 separate holes for the supply lines from the keg? Is there a way to get by with just using 1 hole and perhaps feed the CO2 from my 20 lb external tank into a 5 lb (inside the fridge) tank that then connects to each keg?


Thanks,
Mick

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Old 06-13-2010, 03:49 PM   #4
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If you keep your tank outside, just drill 1 hole for the line and then inside the fridge you can split it anyway you like.

I have an older fridge that I turned into a kegerator a couple weeks ago. I keep my tank inside and it still allows me room for 3 corny kegs. One thing you will notice if you do keep your tank inside is that as your tank gets cold, your regulator will appear to be dropping pressure and it will look like your almost out in a hurry, yet your not... so dont panic if you do go that route.

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Old 06-16-2010, 01:22 AM   #5
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1. I suggest you to put the tank outside. The reason is, the pressure in the tank will get higher at harm temperature, so you will benefit of more co2 before the tank seems to be empty. And another thing that is good is that you dont have to open the door to adjust your regulator that might be hidden behind kegs.

4. No, because I'm not finished yet with mine, but planning is the key. For me it's a long process, I want perfection. I found a danby minifrige with a digital thermostat accessible from the top front, it show me the temperature in the fridge, it's awsome..

Another hint, if your a freak like me. I found that pvc parts from electric outdoor boxs can be usefull to insulate the holes in the fridge some of these part can be connected through the foam with rubber rings and let a 1/2'' hose fit perfectly.

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