The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Question about multi-keg set up

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-09-2006, 06:26 PM   #1
rdwj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rdwj's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Plainfield, IL
Posts: 4,594
Liked 18 Times on 13 Posts

Default Question about multi-keg set up

I'm very new this hobby - I haven't even brewed my first beer yet, but want to go right to kegging.

My question has to do with having kegs in different states in the fridge. From what I understand, in order to force carbonate, I need to increase the pressure in the un-carbonated keg above normal serving pressure. So far, I've only seen air distributors and splitters that allow equal pressure in all attached kegs.

Is there a way to get different pressures in kegs attached to the same tank or do I need multiple tanks? Or, am I completely off base and making noob mistakes?

Any advice is greatly appreciated!!

__________________
rdwj is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 07:28 PM   #2
Mikey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: I'm gone!
Posts: 668
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwj
From what I understand, in order to force carbonate, I need to increase the pressure in the un-carbonated keg above normal serving pressure.
This is 100% false and this incorrect assumption is unfortunately widely repeated throughout the hobby. There is no reason to raise the pressure above serving pressure.

Basic physics is at work here- CO2 gets forced into beer through pressure until the beer is saturated and won't absob more.

What happens if you then reduce the pressure ? The CO2 comes back out of the beer just as easy as it went in. CO2 does not get absorbed permanently.
__________________

Last edited by Mikey; 07-09-2006 at 09:39 PM.
Mikey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 07:31 PM   #3
clayof2day
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
clayof2day's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 567
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwj
From what I understand, in order to force carbonate, I need to increase the pressure in the un-carbonated keg above normal serving pressure.
Not true. If your system is balanced, you should be able to set the pressure based on the volumes of CO2 you want in the beer and leave it at that pressure until its carbed, then continue to serve at that pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdwj
Is there a way to get different pressures in kegs attached to the same tank or do I need multiple tanks?
Yes, if you get a double regulator, you can attach this to 1 tank and it will allow for the tank to dispense at multiple pressures as you can set more than one line independently from 1 CO2 tank.

This would be nice if you are serving soda, or two styles of beer with really different volumes of CO2, otherwise I think they should be close enough that just splitting the CO2 should be sufficient.

If you want to use the over-pressurization method, you can always unhook the keg that is already carbed (will hold pressure as long as its not leaking), set the gas higher and attach uncarbed keg (to force carb with the "quick" method), return to serving presure and hook both up.

Personally I think the "set it and forget method" is much less hassle

Edit: Mikey beat me to point 1
__________________
clayof2day is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 07:49 PM   #4
rdwj
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
rdwj's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Plainfield, IL
Posts: 4,594
Liked 18 Times on 13 Posts

Default

Great! Thanks guys!!

Hey, one last thing (for now)

Is there any advantage or disadvantage to keeping the CO2 tank outside of the fridge? I've seen it done both ways.

__________________
rdwj is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 07:54 PM   #5
wup
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 66
Default

Advantage: More room in the fridge
Disadvantage: CO2 tank outside the fridge taking up space

__________________
wup is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 09:13 PM   #6
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,648
Liked 131 Times on 124 Posts

Default

My current setup has the primary regulator and the CO2 tank outside the kegger. The bottle sits under some shelves along with empty kegs. I can just see the high pressure gage when I go in for a pint, so I don't run out of CO2. This happened too often before with the tank inside the kegger. I have two secondary regulators in the kegger, each feeding 2-way manifolds.

I feed CO2 at 30 PSI in, with a line going to the soda water keg. One secondary regulator is set at 10 psi for the cider, the other is at 4 psi for the "real" ales (quoted bcause someone always has to post that real ales aren't pressurized. Well, I don't have a beer engine yet and it takes 4 psi to dispense).

Higher initial pressures merely carbonate faster, then you have to degas before dispensing.

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk


Last edited by david_42; 07-09-2006 at 09:16 PM.
david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-09-2006, 11:28 PM   #7
Bernie Brewer
Grouchy Old Fart
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Bernie Brewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Eldorado, WI
Posts: 7,539
Liked 109 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clayof2day



Yes, if you get a double regulator, you can attach this to 1 tank and it will allow for the tank to dispense at multiple pressures as you can set more than one line independently from 1 CO2 tank.


Personally I think the "set it and forget method" is much less hassle
Yes you're right, but you didn't mention that the "set it and forget it method" takes a week to carbonate the beer. Over-pressurizing will only take a couple of days. There is really nothing wrong with either method, but I'm impatient with my kegs, so I went with the double regulator.
__________________
I like to squeeze the nickle until the buffalo craps-mt rob

"Why don't we get drunk and screw?" Jimmy Buffett
Bernie Brewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-10-2006, 07:50 AM   #8
Grimsawyer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Salem, OR
Posts: 886
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

LHBS Guy told me of a friend of his that kegged 5 gal of beer, ran the c02 up to 60 psi, rolled the keg around on the floor for 3 hours and poured, was a bit warm and green but had one hell of a head. (I would assume it would work great for a 2.5 abv light beer just fine. You know, the wimpy light yellow beers that have almost no hop flavor at all. Age them and they just get old, heheheh )

__________________

"I feel sorry for people who don't drink. They wake up in the morning and that's as good as they're going to feel all day." -Dean Martin

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheFlyingBeer
...no sense hauling empty carboys around when full ones take up just as much space. :)
Grimsawyer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-10-2006, 10:19 AM   #9
Mikey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: I'm gone!
Posts: 668
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Grimsawyer
LHBS Guy told me of a friend of his that kegged 5 gal of beer, ran the c02 up to 60 psi, rolled the keg around on the floor for 3 hours and poured, was a bit warm and green but had one hell of a head.
Yes that method works, but there's a huge difference between you CAN do it that way, versus you MUST do it that way.

Many people are under the false assumption that you MUST overpressurise to carbonate the beer.
__________________
Mikey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-10-2006, 12:32 PM   #10
Igorstien
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Igorstien's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Fredericton, NB
Posts: 185
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

I still can not understand why you would want to over carbonate and drink it pretty much immediately. We all know that the longer a beer sits the better it become, so why rush it.

If you're in such a hurry to get into the new keg, then you are not brewing enough!!

IGOR

__________________
Igor Stien

Fermenting: MT
Secondary #1: MT Secondary #2: MT
Conditioning: Nothing Drinking: Store bought
On Deck: Festa Brew Red Ale....As soon as I get my bucket back from storage.

All bottles are Guinness bottles, Plus Five Kegs!!!
Igorstien is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Multi Step Infusion Mash Question jacksonbrown All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 05-14-2011 06:00 PM
so, a multi part question wormsgetsold Recipes/Ingredients 10 06-15-2009 01:43 AM
Multi-tasking blackwaterbrewer General Beer Discussion 3 01-28-2009 05:09 PM
Question about multi-regulators for multiple kegs kvh Bottling/Kegging 21 06-07-2007 06:01 PM
multi keg one tap? fshnne1 Bottling/Kegging 13 04-18-2007 01:46 AM