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Old 07-09-2008, 12:15 PM   #1
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Default Possible leaks and what to do?

Another question, O wise brewers!!

I noticed a significant drop in my tanks PSI from about 650 to 500 overnight. I charged the keg and disconnected the tank to see if the pressure comes back up after the tanks warms back up, thinking the cold temp may have caused it. If it turns out that the pressure stays low in the tank, I'll tighten every thing up and test for leaks on the reg connections. But if they test alright, what's the best way to test the keg for leaks with beer already inside?

Any other little tips or tricks would be helpful too.

Cheers.

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Old 07-09-2008, 02:31 PM   #2
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Sounds like you put it in the fridge? Then noticed the pressure drop.

Perfectly normal, don't worry about it. By the way that tank pressure gauge is pretty much worthless for determining how much CO2 you have in the tank.

I think the best way to test for leaks is to spray Star-San on the posts and connectors then look to see if any of the bubbles expand, if so you have a leak. You don't have to rinse the Star-San off like you'd need to if you use soapy water but soapy water works too.

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Old 07-09-2008, 02:33 PM   #3
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If you really think you have leaky connections use liquid hand soap on any potential leak spot and look for bubbles. Its the same procedure many people use to look for leaks in gas plumbing. Even if you have a leak im sure it will be an easy fix, gaskets and o-rings are pretty cheap.

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Old 07-09-2008, 04:24 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abracadabra View Post
Sounds like you put it in the fridge? Then noticed the pressure drop.

Perfectly normal, don't worry about it. By the way that tank pressure gauge is pretty much worthless for determining how much CO2 you have in the tank.

I think the best way to test for leaks is to spray Star-San on the posts and connectors then look to see if any of the bubbles expand, if so you have a leak. You don't have to rinse the Star-San off like you'd need to if you use soapy water but soapy water works too.
That's what I did. I freaked a bit and disconnected it until I could check it out later. I can't run out of gas because I need to dispense beer at an up north camping trip this weekend. I'll double check my connections and re-connect tonight. Thanks.
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Old 07-10-2008, 04:13 PM   #5
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I got home yesterday and checked the tank. The pressure returned to normal after sitting in a hot garage all day!! I checked for leaks anyway, but all seems to be good. I pulled a beer from the keg, and enjoyed my first kegged homebrew. It was delicious and satisfying, even if it came out all foam!!

Cheers.

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Old 07-10-2008, 04:39 PM   #6
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Try using 3/16" beer line and lengthen the hose going from the keg to the tap. I had the same problem as well and this seems to have corrected it

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Old 07-10-2008, 06:07 PM   #7
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Or in a pinch you can just drop the serving pressure by pulling the pressure relief valve so that the beer flows slowly out. Be sure an open the tap all the way, trying to slow the rate of flow down by only partially opening you tap makes the foam worse.

Congradulation on your first kegged beer!

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