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reinstone 08-13-2012 11:08 PM

parts needed
 
Hello-

I have a lagering chest freezer that is about 10 feet away from my other refrigerators in my garage where my co2 stuff is. I want to transfer from one keg to another and not disturb (accidentally typed mistrub which would amazingly work too) the sediment. I have read the best way to do this is without moving the keg. I use a ball lock setup w/ quick disconnects......can anyone give me a parts list or something to make this happen? thanks.

Reno_eNVy 08-13-2012 11:19 PM

This is quite simple. If you already have your normal CO2 set-up all you need is two 'liquid-out' ball lock quick disconnects with a line between them. Connect one to each liquid-out post on your kegs. Then you just hit the first keg with CO2 and that will push it over to the other keg. You just need to get either a relief quick disconnect that you can set to release CO2 once a certain pressure is reached or just purge the manual relief-valve at the top of the keg when the flow starts to slow down.

It will also help the transfer if the line and kegs are cold.

Hope that helps!

lutherslagers 08-13-2012 11:27 PM

1. Tubing - Enough to get from your CO2 manifold or regulator to fridge where you are fermenting. And enough to create a jumper from your keg in your fermentation fridge back to your kegerator fridge.
2. 4 hose clamps
3. 4 Swivel Nuts - I'm assuming you are using MFL ends on your manifold/regulator and on your QDs. If not we can revise this.
4. 1 gas quick disconnect.
5. 2 liquid quick disconnects.

Create a long CO2 hose with swivel nuts on both sides of the tubing and hose clamp them into the tubing. Screw the gas QD into one of the swivel nuts. Connect the non-QD end to regulator/manifold. Connect gas QD end to keg.

Create a long jumper by putting swivel nuts into both sides of the tubing and hold in place with hose clamps. Screw liquid QDs into both sides. Connect to both kegs. Turn gas on to about 5 psi and it will move the liquid from the full get to the not so full keg. Not knowing your distance you may need more than 5 psi. Just keep the gas low enough to move the beer.

bwarbiany 08-13-2012 11:28 PM

I have my keezer next to my fermentation fridge, but in principle it works the same even if it's a bit farther away.

Basically I just have one of the CO2 lines in my keezer slightly longer than the others, and run that out to my other fridge when transfer time occurs. I have my blowoff tube set up with a male MFL fitting, and so I pull off the gas disconnect from the line coming out of the keezer and connect MFL->MFL fittings. But the principal is the same.

For you, here's what I'd do:

1) Get a long (10'+) line of CO2 tubing. Have it hooked up to a gray gas disconnect on the keg side, and to something like this on the CO2 end.
2) Get a shorter keg->keg "jumper" like this.
3) On transfer day, just hook up the long CO2 tube to your normal CO2 in place, and jumper from one keg to the other, and transfer.

I do recommend transferring at lower pressure than you normally serve beer, as a slower transfer helps you to avoid sediment. And when doing this type of transfer, it might be best to do it with a shortened dip tube in the "source" keg to ensure you're not picking up any sediment.

But it's a relatively easy proposition here...

bwarbiany 08-13-2012 11:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lutherslagers (Post 4328229)
Create a long jumper by putting swivel nuts into both sides of the tubing and hold in place with hose clamps. Screw liquid QDs into both sides. Connect to both kegs. Turn gas on to about 5 psi and it will move the liquid from the full get to the not so full keg. Not knowing your distance you may need more than 5 psi. Just keep the gas low enough to move the beer.

FYI you don't need a "long" jumper, as the key is not to move the *source* keg. Moving the target keg after the transfer is completed should be no concern as there should be no sediment in it anyway...

lutherslagers 08-13-2012 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bwarbiany (Post 4328239)
FYI you don't need a "long" jumper, as the key is not to move the *source* keg. Moving the target keg after the transfer is completed should be no concern as there should be no sediment in it anyway...

But at $0.39 a foot for Perlick hose, I'd rather not carry 5 gallons of beer across the room.

reinstone 08-14-2012 02:43 AM

thanks ....hopefully i will have some clear beer by october


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