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Old 04-12-2012, 05:26 AM   #1
jmlivingston10
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Default Ongoing bottling issue.

I've been bottling for some time, and have an ongoing issue. When I bottle my brews seem to meet a peak at about 3-6 weeks. After that my beer seems to over carbonate and get super fizzy/chlorinated flavor. Suggestions (other than moving to kegging which I've done :-P )?

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Old 04-12-2012, 11:51 AM   #2
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Don't know what to say about the chlorine flavor. As for fizzy, it may be that you are not totally fermented out, and you you are therefore adding too much priming sugar. Or, it may be that you aren't correctly calculating the amount of co2 in the beer before priming (which is dependent upon the highest temperature reached in fermentation).

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Old 04-12-2012, 06:45 PM   #3
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I usually use yeast starters and ferment in my basement @ about 60 degrees. I suppose since they are ales mostly they could sit a bit longer or bring them upstairs to ferment at a warmer temp? But when I carb I use the standard 3/4c priming sugar and pint of water per 5 gallons.

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Old 04-12-2012, 08:05 PM   #4
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I am not sure how you are prepping your bottles?

I have been refining my techniques with yeast starters, stir plate
and yeast and priming calculators. Beers have been improving.

I always used 3/4c or 5 oz of priming sugar that came with my kits.
Not priming by style of beer.

Looking at Northern Brewers priming calculator a Stout only
requires 3.11 oz or.44 cup of corn sugar vs the 5oz I have been using.

So you may be over priming.

My basement is 62 degrees. Beers carb fine at that temperature.

What I found interesting was if you play with the temperature on the calculator the higher the temperature the more priming sugar.
Which was opposite of what I would have thought.

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Old 04-12-2012, 09:13 PM   #5
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I usually just wash my bottles in the dish washer and then sanitize with a light bleach water mixture (about 1/2 tsp per 5 gallons of water) when I do my starters I just let them sit in a glass 1/2 gal handle for a day or two and give them a good swirling once or twice. The beers carb up fine but like I said, after about 2 months they taste fizzy and chlorinated.

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Old 04-12-2012, 11:33 PM   #6
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If you rinse your bottles good after consuming the beer
they rarely need washing.

If you see anything in the bottle add about a 1/4 teaspoon of
oxy clean and a little water, let set over night. Shake then rinse.

On bottling day I fill my double bowl sink one side I add about
a 1/4 cup bleach, the other a cap full of iodophor.

Put about 6 bottles in the bleach for a couple minutes then empty
and transfer to the side with iodophor. Add bottles to the bleach
side then transfer the bottles from iodophor to the tines in an empty dishwasher.

When all done rinsing bottles, rack on your priming sugar in the bottling bucket and go.

You might also try using the priming calculator and backing off on you priming sugar a little.

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Old 04-13-2012, 05:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzbass View Post
I am not sure how you are prepping your bottles?

What I found interesting was if you play with the temperature on the calculator the higher the temperature the more priming sugar.
Which was opposite of what I would have thought.
That's because the temperature in the calculator refers to the highest temperature reached in your beer's fermentation, not the temperature you intend to carb your bottle. Because there is already co2 in solution in your beer after fermentation, before you add sugar you need to adjust for that. And since the colder the solution, the better gas is absorbed, therefore, beer fermented cooler needs less sugar to get the same co2 into solution than a beer fermented warmer. If you are just using one amount for all your beer styles and fermentations, you're missing out on some flavor, IMHO.
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Old 04-13-2012, 01:26 PM   #8
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I know there is a kegging co2 chart, but is there a bottling chart? How do I calculate the amount of sugar needed to bottle?
SO MANY QUESTIONS AAAHHHHH!!
:-)
Thanks for everyone participating tho!

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Old 04-13-2012, 01:54 PM   #9
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Here you go.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/priming-sugar-calculator/

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Old 04-13-2012, 04:14 PM   #10
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I've been brewing for 3 years and have bottled every brew. I had the same problem for the first 10 or so beers, using the amount included in the kits. Once I switched to using the online calculator (I personally use http://tastybrew.com/calculators/priming.html but they should all work for you) I started getting much better results! Good luck

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