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Old 10-16-2012, 06:11 PM   #1
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Default Noob kegging question

I've got my kegging equipment on the way, I'm very excited I might add. Anyways..I've read about every tutorial and watched every video on kegging and force carbing I can find. There is something I’m not sure of though, after I’ve forced carbed and let the beer sit for a few more days. Do I need to hook the CO2 line back up as I'm dispensing the beer? I've seen a few videos that made it look like this was the case but I haven't been able to find anyone who has actually commented on this. Most of these tutorials touch on prepping, and filling. Not dispensing. Thanks in advance.

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:14 PM   #2
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Yes, you need to push the beer with CO2 pressure. Just to be sure you're on the right track, what method, exactly, do you plan to use to force carb your beer?

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:15 PM   #3
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IMO/IME you're better off using the slower forced carbing method, over the rapid one. Give the keg two weeks at serving pressure (and temperature) to carbonate. As shown in this chart. IF you used the rapid method, then you'll still need to wait for the keg to equalize before you pour. That can take the same amount of time as using the slower (or two week) method. IMO, if it's easier on me and gets me a solid result, I do it. IMO/IME, trying to do the rapid forced carbonate will very often result in over carbonated kegs that you then take more time correcting.

Also, you need to keep the keg at serving pressure (and temperature) until it kicks. Each time you pull a pint from the keg, more CO2 needs to go in.

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:18 PM   #4
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I think your confused dude.... The gas line is always hooked up, while carbing & dispensing. If you're carbing at a high pressure....when your done unhook or turn off the gas valve, bleed the keg, turn the pressure down to 12 psi and hook back up and serve. The easiest way is to just hook up the gas, set it to 12psi, let it sit for a couple weeks and serve.....with the line still connected that is.

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:19 PM   #5
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+1 one on slower forced carbing. You'll have less headaches and foaming issues.
Make sure your beer line is long enough too to help prevent foaming.
Once the keg is carbed, you can essentially take it off the c02, there will be enough pressure to push beer out for a while. I usually leave it on a low PSI for pushing out once I get to my optimum carbonation.

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stratslinger View Post
Yes, you need to push the beer with CO2 pressure. Just to be sure you're on the right track, what method, exactly, do you plan to use to force carb your beer?
Everything I've seen so far as pretty much told me to chill the beer for 24 hours in the keg, hook up the CO2, turn the valve up to about 25PSI, lay the tank on it's side and gently rock for about 2-3 minutes. Then put the beer back in the fridge for another 24 hours, after that I supposed to release a little bit of CO2 and put it back in the fridge for another 4 days or so. What Golddiggie makes a lot of sense but i'll be honest I feel more confused then ever now. I know everyone has there own way of doing things, I really need to get some hands on experience and find out what works for me I guess.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:28 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cold71 View Post
Everything I've seen so far as pretty much told me to chill the beer for 24 hours in the keg, hook up the CO2, turn the valve up to about 25PSI, lay the tank on it's side and gently rock for about 2-3 minutes. Then put the beer back in the fridge for another 24 hours, after that I supposed to release a little bit of CO2 and put it back in the fridge for another 4 days or so. What Golddiggie makes a lot of sense but i'll be honest I feel more confused then ever now. I know everyone has there own way of doing things, I really need to get some hands on experience and find out what works for me I guess.
Oh, no don't do that! If you MUST shake the keg (and I do not recommend it but if you MUST), then have the psi at no higher than 12 psi. Otherwise, you'll have overcarbed foamy beer.

There are two pretty sure-fire ways to get a good carb. The first is to set the keg in the kegerator, set it at 12 psi, and come back in a week to 10 days. That makes perfect carbonation.

If you're in a huge hurry, set the beer in the kegerator at 30 psi for 36 hours, then purge and reset to 12 psi. That will give you a decent carb level in about 48 hours.

Shaking/rolling/rocking the keg will not be a reliable way to do it, and it's not any faster than the 48 hour method I mentioned above.
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:31 PM   #8
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You'll get a more stable result by using the two weeks at serving pressure, and temperature, method. The rocking, at high pressure, can be VERY tricky for getting the desired CO2 volumes level. It's very easy to over carbonate a keg that way.

IMO, the rapid forced carbonation method is for people with zero patience and just want to get beer to glass fast. That's not me. I have four spots in my brew fridge, with three taps. SO, I have one keg being carbonated at any point, while three are being served. By the time a keg kicks, the one not on tap is carbonated fully.

I'm thinking about putting some of the kegs that are being stored in the basement, onto a CO2 feed. I'll just need to set the pressure to the correct level to at least partially carbonate them as they sit.

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Old 10-16-2012, 06:34 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
Oh, no don't do that! If you MUST shake the keg (and I do not recommend it but if you MUST), then have the psi at no higher than 12 psi. Otherwise, you'll have overcarbed foamy beer.

There are two pretty sure-fire ways to get a good carb. The first is to set the keg in the kegerator, set it at 12 psi, and come back in a week to 10 days. That makes perfect carbonation.

If you're in a huge hurry, set the beer in the kegerator at 30 psi for 36 hours, then purge and reset to 12 psi. That will give you a decent carb level in about 48 hours.

Shaking/rolling/rocking the keg will not be a reliable way to do it, and it's not any faster than the 48 hour method I mentioned above.
Thank you everyone for their help and thank you Yooper. This sounds like a very easy way to get it done. Leaving the gas turned on kind of freaks me out, any idea what it would take to over pressurize, rupturing the tank?
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:37 PM   #10
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Corny kegs are made to withstand up to 130 PSI. Sanke kegs are made for up to 60 PSI. Chances of you getting the keg to either point (without seriously F'ing up) is virtually nil.

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