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Old 01-25-2008, 12:37 AM   #1
Hogshead
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Default Nitrogen 75% Carbon Dioxide 25%...?

So when I started brewing I was lucky enough to have someone in the restaurant industry give me an extra Co2 tank for my setup. (probably saved me about $100+ for a deposit fee.) and it worked great, couldn't have been happier.

I got it refilled at a Liquor store no less for like $25... the guy just took the tank into the backroom filled it and came out. But he told me, "needs to be hydro-tested soon, so after the new year you'll need to get that done before I can fill it again."

So I went to Airgas the other day to have my Co2 tank exchanged for one that was Hydro tested, (because that's where the tank was from initially). The guy at the counter asked, "what do you use it for...? oh, homebrewing give the guy the 75/25 mix."

So now my beer doesn't seem to react to the carb pressure like it used to. I used to be able to carb my beer at like 30 pounds and then turn it down to 10-15 for pouring. Now I'm at 40 pounds and my beer is hardly getting carbonated at all.

I'm not complaining! Quite the contrary, my beer now has this great thick head, and I'm not fighting over-carbonating at all... I'm thinking the Liquor store gave me a higher percentage of Co2 and now that I have what the Airgas company knew would work better so I'm actually getting what I should have all along.

What are other brewers using out there to Keg with? And am I just crazy thinking I have a different percentage of Co2?

I know some brewers use Nitrous for Stouts and Porters, what are the percentages I should be looking for when I go back to get my keg refilled?

And final question, what do different styles of beer have to do with the affect of Co2? Does higher or lower gravity make a difference? Does alcohol content? I can't imagine that a beer under 8% (at the highest) is going to make it pour differently, would it?

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Old 01-25-2008, 01:50 AM   #2
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What you've got is called beer gas. MOST homebrewers are using just plain CO2. Beer gas is really cool stuff but it's a whole different ball game - it's used in bars where they have extremely long lines between serving tanks and the taps (because nitrogen is not very soluble, so they can have enough pressure to push it without putting too much CO2 into solution), and some homebrewers use it with special stout faucets for serving certain beers (stout, scottish, etc) the way you normally see guinness - lightly carbonated but with a thick, creamy head. I don't think I've seen too many people using beer gas with a regular faucet, however.

You've already discovered the pressure issue... Due to the concept of partial pressure, you have to turn the pressure up a lot higher with beer gas to get the same amount of CO2 into solution (thus achieve a given level of carbonation).

Maybe someone who's used beer gas with a regular faucet can chime in? (if anyone?)

Personally, I would go back and get regular CO2... or maybe invest in a stout faucet, though in that case you'd be stuck serving all your beer on beer gas, which isn't exactly universally appropriate.

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Old 01-25-2008, 11:57 AM   #3
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You are suppose to have a different type regulator for nitrogen beer gas.

Also nitrogen beer gas is 2x as expensive as straight CO2.

Don't know what size tank you have but my 10# tank was filled for $12.80 but depending on where I go I have been charge more for a 2.5# and 5# tank. Because the guys that charge $12.80 can't do anything less than a 10# tank.

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Old 01-25-2008, 12:26 PM   #4
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I'd go back to plain old CO2. I suppose you could jack up the pressure and run a super long beer line to balance, but just using C02 is cheapest and easiest.

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Old 01-29-2008, 05:57 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hogshead
I know some brewers use Nitrous for Stouts and Porters, what are the percentages I should be looking for when I go back to get my keg refilled?
I know this is a dead thread, but in case somebody is searching some day, and stumbles across it, I just wanted to correct the bad information given above.

We do NOT USE NITROUS for stouts and porters. NitroGEN is used for alternative dispensing (e.g. Guinness).

NITROUS IS NOT NITROGEN. They are two different products. Nitrous Oxide is laughing gas aka speed boost gas for racers and ricers. For your safety, please do not dispense your beer with Nitrous.

http://www.yoursforgoodfermentables....-in-stout.html
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Old 01-31-2008, 10:41 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chriso

NITROUS IS NOT NITROGEN. They are two different products. Nitrous Oxide is laughing gas aka speed boost gas for racers and ricers. For your safety, please do not dispense your beer with Nitrous.

I actually looked into this a while back and it seemed as if nitrous had a similar enough solubility that I would imagine it would make a fine beer gas.... now if I could only find a source for food grade nitrous tanks....
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Old 06-25-2013, 12:40 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriso View Post
I know this is a dead thread, but in case somebody is searching some day, and stumbles across it, I just wanted to correct the bad information given above.

We do NOT USE NITROUS for stouts and porters. NitroGEN is used for alternative dispensing (e.g. Guinness).

NITROUS IS NOT NITROGEN. They are two different products. Nitrous Oxide is laughing gas aka speed boost gas for racers and ricers. For your safety, please do not dispense your beer with Nitrous.

http://www.yoursforgoodfermentables....-in-stout.html
Thank you for that.. I was actually searching and came across this thread because I want to add, what I thought was Nitrous to my beers I've actually had IPA's on tap with Nitrogen, it was fantastic, so I want to see if I can do something similar with ALL my beers

I would love to have that nitrogen head on a hefe.

*edit* holy crap, old thread much!? atleast i'm using the search function, haha.
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