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Old 11-27-2012, 02:55 AM   #1
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Default Newbie keg question

Ok have my first all grain brew (Sweetwater IPA clone) kegged and has been carbing for two weeks at room temp with about 4 oz of priming sugar. Dying to try it and I know this is a dumb question but... What's the best method? Just hook up the serving line and pour some? I know I'll pour sediment and yeast to start. Is it important to chill down first? Can I check it now to see if its carbed and check the taste? Or should I be a good boy, wait until the three week mark, then chill for two days, THEN tap it?

Main question is it safe to hook up the serving line now to get a sample and then disconnect?

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Old 11-27-2012, 05:21 AM   #2
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Why do you add priming sugar to a keg? You don't need it. You rack into the keg, put pressure on it, let it sit with pressure and it carbs itself. You don't need the priming sugar to do the work anymore. Plus, you don't have all the sediment to contend with.

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Old 11-27-2012, 05:32 AM   #3
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Since you used sugar to carb I would think you just need to chill it overnight at least, since you'll get more trub out then normal. Normally I just primary->secondary->keg and let it chill overnight @ 7-8psi (all my kegs are at that) and try it the next day. It will be undercarbed by quite a bit but that's how I like my beer normally. The process I use will also help cold crash and settle out yeast so my first 1/2 pint will just be yucky and I can toss it then it's clear sailing. Welcome to kegging! Have you given your bottling gear a rude gesture yet?

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Old 11-27-2012, 07:31 AM   #4
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Hey, I agree with sniperd in that I like my beer undercarbed!

But… why are you priming your keg?!? It’s not that uncommon, say you want to conserve co2; but it doesn’t ‘conserve’ much. Can you explain more on why?
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Old 11-27-2012, 01:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Garyr2973
Why do you add priming sugar to a keg? You don't need it. You rack into the keg, put pressure on it, let it sit with pressure and it carbs itself. You don't need the priming sugar to do the work anymore. Plus, you don't have all the sediment to contend with.
I know there are couple ways to do it. I chose the natural way for this first time because I want to save on CO2. It's not my CO2 tank I'm borrowing it from a neighbor so I just am doing the natural carbing.
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Old 11-27-2012, 01:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by discooby
Hey, I agree with sniperd in that I like my beer undercarbed!

But… why are you priming your keg?!? It’s not that uncommon, say you want to conserve co2; but it doesn’t ‘conserve’ much. Can you explain more on why?
I just chose the natural carbing method this time because I didn't want to keep gas on both of these kegs the whole time. It seems like there's a lot of debate on natural carbing versus force carbing and it seems like a lot of the people on this forum like the natural carbing with priming sugar. From what I've read with force carbing you have to have it on 30 psi for a couple days and shake and shake. Also, my buddy who loaned me the two kegs and co2 does the priming method so just followed his lead. I plan in trying force carbing in the future though and I know there are a few techniques.
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Old 11-27-2012, 03:18 PM   #7
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I've done it natural and forced, but I've never done the 30psi for a few days. I tried it once and it just didn't work well for me. It's much easier to carb it up with C02 'set and forget' to your serving psi then to try and figure out how to reduce the carb level in the beer. I recently overcarbed one by mistake.. what a hassle trying to degas it.

The only time I do natural now is if we are planning a party and a brewing buddy of mine wants to bring his beer in a keg, and he only bottles. He'll naturally carb it and I'll bring my gas gear to the party. To give you an idea you should be able to get about 6 or 7 kegs through a C02 tank (carbing and pushing) so really you aren't using much C02 for 1 keg.

Welcome to kegging!

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Old 11-27-2012, 06:37 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sniperd
I've done it natural and forced, but I've never done the 30psi for a few days. I tried it once and it just didn't work well for me. It's much easier to carb it up with C02 'set and forget' to your serving psi then to try and figure out how to reduce the carb level in the beer. I recently overcarbed one by mistake.. what a hassle trying to degas it.

The only time I do natural now is if we are planning a party and a brewing buddy of mine wants to bring his beer in a keg, and he only bottles. He'll naturally carb it and I'll bring my gas gear to the party. To give you an idea you should be able to get about 6 or 7 kegs through a C02 tank (carbing and pushing) so really you aren't using much C02 for 1 keg.

Welcome to kegging!
Thanks that makes sense. I just borrowed the gas tank to set the seal and then let these two kegs prime. So in this method "carb it up with C02 'set and forget' to your serving psi" how long does it take to be carbed? I don't like over carbed beer but certainly not flat either. A little head when you pour and then it dissipate some, but can always see bubbles coming up from bottom.
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Secondary:
On tap: Orange Belgian IPA, Irish Stout, American Amber, Oatmeal Brown, Ordinary Bitter
Bottled: Weizenbier, LaChouffe Clone, La Fin Du Monde Clone, Cottage House Oaked Saison with Chardonnay

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Old 11-27-2012, 06:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2xu View Post
Ok have my first all grain brew (Sweetwater IPA clone) kegged and has been carbing for two weeks at room temp with about 4 oz of priming sugar. Dying to try it and I know this is a dumb question but... What's the best method? Just hook up the serving line and pour some? I know I'll pour sediment and yeast to start. Is it important to chill down first? Can I check it now to see if its carbed and check the taste? Or should I be a good boy, wait until the three week mark, then chill for two days, THEN tap it?

Main question is it safe to hook up the serving line now to get a sample and then disconnect?
I think a couple people are missing something crucial here, or at least if someone's pointed it out, I've missed it...

I'm sorry to be the one to point this out to you, but you're going to have an over carb'ed beer on your hands. Best bet will be to let it ride (the larger volume of the keg should take a little longer to condition than the smaller volume of a 12oz bottle), but start hitting that relief valve a bit NOW to release some of the excess CO2.

According to my handy-dandy Beersmith Lite app, for 2.4 volumes of CO2, you should have used 2.13oz of sugar to prime that keg at 72 degrees. Playing with it a little more, it looks like 4oz should produce about 3.8 volumes of CO2.

Certainly not the end of the world - if you hit that release valve a few times and vent the gas as it builds up, more of the CO2 will come out of solution, and you'll eventually get back down to an appropriate level of carbonation. It just might take a little time and experimentation.
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Old 11-27-2012, 09:38 PM   #10
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So in this method "carb it up with C02 'set and forget' to your serving psi" how long does it take to be carbed?.
I would say overnight gives you a little bit of bubbles and a nice cool beer. But probably 3 to 7 days to get it where it feels about right.
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