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-   -   New To Kegging (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/new-kegging-353478/)

HaveADrinkOnMe 09-10-2012 07:08 PM

New To Kegging
 
Well my buddy and I are new to the art of kegging and our novice minds on the topic prevailed over satisfying carbonated beer.

From the advice of another homebrewer I know, we kegged an Alt Oktoberfest Ale and a Kolsch. The first mistake I have now discovered is I started carbing as soon as I put the kegs in the fridge and didn't allow them to get down to the 37-38 degree mark I was aiming for.
The second mistake that I found out when tasting this last weekend was that I only set the kegs to carb at 20 psi for 3 days (one of the days when the beer was still trying to cool) and I was excited as I poured my first glass because of the head only to discover the after taste was quite flat.

I have spent several hours scouring the kegging and carbonation threads on this site and have determined that I 1)Didn't allow a long enough time frame for the CO2 to take into the beer and 2)Didn't wait until the beer was at the desired temperature to even start carbing.

Some other causes of concern are that we are using 2 used kegs and one of the in posts was fizzing when I attached the co2 disconnect which leads me to believe that we need to invest in some new o rings and seals, also we didn't have any keg lube this time.

My theory on making our next batch a success is to purchase new rings and seals, maybe even new in and out posts for the kegs, and keg lube. Waiting until the beer gets to the 37-38 degree range before carbing, and then actually waiting a week or 2 with the psi set to around 12-13.
Any helpful hints or words of advice would be appreciated.

WhiteEagle1 09-10-2012 09:40 PM

This is good info....as I will be kegging my beer for the first time in a few weeks. Thanks!

nasty_rabbit 09-10-2012 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HaveADrinkOnMe
Well my buddy and I are new to the art of kegging and our novice minds on the topic prevailed over satisfying carbonated beer.

From the advice of another homebrewer I know, we kegged an Alt Oktoberfest Ale and a Kolsch. The first mistake I have now discovered is I started carbing as soon as I put the kegs in the fridge and didn't allow them to get down to the 37-38 degree mark I was aiming for.
The second mistake that I found out when tasting this last weekend was that I only set the kegs to carb at 20 psi for 3 days (one of the days when the beer was still trying to cool) and I was excited as I poured my first glass because of the head only to discover the after taste was quite flat.

I have spent several hours scouring the kegging and carbonation threads on this site and have determined that I 1)Didn't allow a long enough time frame for the CO2 to take into the beer and 2)Didn't wait until the beer was at the desired temperature to even start carbing.

Some other causes of concern are that we are using 2 used kegs and one of the in posts was fizzing when I attached the co2 disconnect which leads me to believe that we need to invest in some new o rings and seals, also we didn't have any keg lube this time.

My theory on making our next batch a success is to purchase new rings and seals, maybe even new in and out posts for the kegs, and keg lube. Waiting until the beer gets to the 37-38 degree range before carbing, and then actually waiting a week or 2 with the psi set to around 12-13.
Any helpful hints or words of advice would be appreciated.

You probably need to disconnect the gas and replace the "O" rings now and get some keg lube. If not you next thread will be "why is my CO2 tank empty?"

edmanster 09-10-2012 10:13 PM

You can use Vaseline/petroleum jelly as keg lube..

It doesn't matter when you hook the gas up to start since the keg is warm and would require a higher psi than the fridge setting to do anything..

I do 30psi for 2 days and then down to 12psi for a week..

nasty_rabbit 09-10-2012 10:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by edmanster
You can use Vaseline/petroleum jelly as keg lube..

I would stay away from Vaseline. It is NOT water soluble and it may/will gum up poppets. Don't consider cutting corners with a $3.00 gasket kit or a $5.00 tub of keg lube when the keg is holding $40.00 plus time in beer.

edmanster 09-10-2012 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nasty_rabbit

I would stay away from Vaseline. It is NOT water soluble and it may/will gum up poppets. Don't consider cutting corners with a $3.00 gasket kit or a $5.00 tub of keg lube when the keg is holding $40.00 plus time in beer.

In a pinch it works just fine and the food grade lube I use is petroleum based!

nasty_rabbit 09-10-2012 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by edmanster

In a pinch it works just fine and the food grade lube I use is petroleum based!

You typed the words. FOOD grade. I for one would not put Vaseline on any thing that I was going to consume.

edmanster 09-10-2012 10:31 PM

http://i59.photobucket.com/albums/g292/COHummer/Wine%20Making/MineralOilLubricant.jpg

Hmmm. Let me think about what people do with Vaseline...

nasty_rabbit 09-10-2012 10:38 PM

1 Attachment(s)
That's not Vaseline. This is.

edmanster 09-10-2012 10:49 PM

K, as with everything my phone is to smart for me to link you to the MSDS but I can show you their page with no warnings of people eating it by the handful..
http://www.vaseline.us/products/petroleum-jelly/original/default.aspx


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