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Old 07-18-2014, 12:46 AM   #11
day_trippr
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A bare manifold (no shut-off valves) would provide essentially zero restriction. Supposedly, anti-backflow check-valves often found integrated into gas shut-off valves on manifolds induce up to 1/2 psi of restriction. I have no way of measuring something that small in either of my gas systems, so I basically ignore it...

Cheers!

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Old 08-10-2014, 08:38 PM   #12
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Wow. I have been too busy to deal with this, but I have finally made some headway on this project. Of course I have questions!

Got the fridge cleaned and it works!
Have been cleaning the kegs.
Got line to replace the gunky line.

Found out my LHBS does tank exchange for 5lb and 20lb tanks. I have a 15lb. Looks like I am going to have to get it tested and filled.

It does have some gas in it. However it appears that the tank side regulator gauge has taken a hit and does not work, it is bottomed out in the red and there is a dent on the side of the gauge. The low side registers pressure, but I do not know how accurate it is.

What sayeth the wise ones here? Should I replace the gauge? Is there a way to test the accuracy of the line pressure gauge? Should I just bit the bullet and buy a new regulator and gauges?

I am not super worried about the high side gauge anyway as my understanding is they are not much use.

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Old 08-10-2014, 09:39 PM   #13
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A high pressure CO2 gauge will cost you around $10-15 delivered. I think they're worth it because of this chart.



So while a damaged high side gauge wouldn't keep me from operating either of my CO2 systems, I'd replace the gauge eventually.

As for the low pressure gauge, if there's no evident damage to it, unless you have alternate means of verifying the pressure, go on faith until you have reason to be suspicious...

Cheers!

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Old 08-11-2014, 12:31 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by day_trippr View Post
A high pressure CO2 gauge will cost you around $10-15 delivered. I think they're worth it because of this chart.



So while a damaged high side gauge wouldn't keep me from operating either of my CO2 systems, I'd replace the gauge eventually.

As for the low pressure gauge, if there's no evident damage to it, unless you have alternate means of verifying the pressure, go on faith until you have reason to be suspicious...

Cheers!
But what about all the stuff you read about how the high pressure gauge doesn't really tell you anything unless you have a really big tank? That it will register full until it is empty?

Why not just get a plug (brass fitting) and remove the high pressure gauge?
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Old 08-11-2014, 03:59 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ericbw View Post
But what about all the stuff you read about how the high pressure gauge doesn't really tell you anything unless you have a really big tank? That it will register full until it is empty?

Why not just get a plug (brass fitting) and remove the high pressure gauge?
That graphic explains all...just look at it for a minute...

Cheers!
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Old 08-11-2014, 06:18 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by day_trippr View Post
That graphic explains all...just look at it for a minute...

Cheers!
I may not understand the graphic completely. at 40 degrees, the PSI will read 567 when it is 100% full? And when it is 40% full what does it read? 567?
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Old 08-11-2014, 07:16 PM   #17
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Quote:
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I may not understand the graphic completely. at 40 degrees, the PSI will read 567 when it is 100% full? And when it is 40% full what does it read? 567?
Yup. The high pressure gauge doesn't tell you how much CO2 is in the tank, but IMO it's still very useful to know that there's some CO2 in the tank. So if it were me I'd keep the gauge.
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Old 08-11-2014, 07:20 PM   #18
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Yes, you have that correct - which is important

The real points of interest, however, occur to the left. If you follow your 40°F curve you can continue to calculate the remaining % of fill by the high pressure reading, so that when the gauge hits 400psi the tank is down to the 10% fill level.

In my case, that "knee" in the chart tells me the tank's about ready to be swapped without needing to periodically remove the reg and weigh the tank. As my tanks are outside the keezer and carb fridge I use the actual room temperature and find the corresponding point on the chart...

Cheers!

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Old 08-13-2014, 02:00 AM   #19
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Thanks for the info!

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Old 08-13-2014, 02:35 AM   #20
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I don't use my high pressure gauges. When it's empty you know it. I do have a few 20 oz paint ball tanks. I'd really like a bigger tank and just use my 5 pounder as a backup.

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