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Old 11-18-2009, 02:46 AM   #1
bloodsweatandcheers
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Default natural carbonation in a sanke?

If I didn't want to futz with a CO2 system and regulator and such, but recently picked up a old sanke keg, could I ferment in carboy as usual, then transfer to sanke and prime with sugar, as if I was bottle carbing, would my beer carbonate in the usual ~2 weeks?
also, from there, what would I need to get the beer into my glass/mouth?
Research has told me I'd need a coupler (sanke obviously) and some 3/8 beer tubing, hardware to connect the tubing to the faucet (basically a nipple, o-ring, sleeve, and hose clamp) and then the faucet.
is that right? because if thats the case, I'd rather plop down 100 bucks and never have to bottle again.

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Old 11-18-2009, 02:54 AM   #2
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You'd also need a fridge that'd hold the sankey, unless your plan is to drink the whole thing in one night... In which case your best bet would be to get a bucket, lots of ice water and a Bronco pump - just like a frat boy ha ha ha.

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Old 11-18-2009, 03:05 AM   #3
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now is that so my beer would be cold? or would the beer spoil?
and how long could a keg keep (both in taste and carbonation) if it was at a constant 60-70 degrees f?

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Old 11-18-2009, 03:06 AM   #4
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You need the CO2 system to serve the beer, unless you're serving it all at once as SeamusMac suggested.

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Old 11-18-2009, 05:39 AM   #5
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why is that?
would it de carbonate over time?
I thought the sanke seals were pretty bomber?

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Old 11-18-2009, 01:18 PM   #6
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The seals on it are fine, however if you want to pump out more beer you need to over pressurize the inside of the keg so the beer will come out. If you carbonate naturally there will be pressure in the keg, but after you have poured some beer that pressure will go down. Once the inside of the keg is at the same pressure of the outside air you wont get any more beer out.

You can use a hand pump to pump air into it to increase the pressure, but then you introduce oxygen and your beer will go bad. That is why people use co2 or nitrogen, you can add pressure without oxygenating your beer.

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Old 11-18-2009, 01:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bloodsweatandcheers View Post
why is that?
would it de carbonate over time?
I thought the sanke seals were pretty bomber?
thirdedition explained it well. I guess the way I think of it is this- a keg is really just a very big bottle. It can easily carb up with priming sugar. But when you serve some of the beer, you use up the co2 that was in the headspace. So, you need something (a co2 tank and regulator, a little co2 "gun" or a pump) to push the beer out after a few pours. Otherwise the beer will go flat, and you won't have a way to get it out of the keg.

Think of a bottle of beer you open. You pour half. Even if you recap, the beer left in the bottle would go flat.
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