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Old 01-31-2006, 10:20 PM   #1
MNBugeater
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Default Kegging and Bottling

Im about to bottle/keg my first brew ever (India Pale Ale).

I have a Corny Keg & CO2. I have bottles. Im ready...but I have a delima and a couple quesitons.

Is it possilbe to both bottle SOME and keg the rest? I'd lke to be able to take a few over to a buddies house and even keep a bottle for posterity. Yet Im looking to keg this for a party the end of February [assuming it turns out].

If I bottle 12, will there be TOO much extra room in the keg ?

Finally, I dont have a dedicated keg fridge yet. But I have two rooms in my house that stay around 63F-64F. Thats where ive been doing my secondary fermentation. I was going ot store the keg in there until its ready to be served. Will this work for storage? And finally, can I just cool down the keg a few hours prior to serving it ?

Thanks

MNBugeater

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Old 02-01-2006, 12:06 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MNBugeater
Im about to bottle/keg my first brew ever (India Pale Ale).

I have a Corny Keg & CO2. I have bottles. Im ready...but I have a delima and a couple quesitons.

Is it possilbe to both bottle SOME and keg the rest? I'd lke to be able to take a few over to a buddies house and even keep a bottle for posterity. Yet Im looking to keg this for a party the end of February [assuming it turns out].

If I bottle 12, will there be TOO much extra room in the keg ?

Finally, I dont have a dedicated keg fridge yet. But I have two rooms in my house that stay around 63F-64F. Thats where ive been doing my secondary fermentation. I was going ot store the keg in there until its ready to be served. Will this work for storage? And finally, can I just cool down the keg a few hours prior to serving it ?

Thanks

MNBugeater
Yes, you can bottle and keg the same batch. How you do it depends on how elaborate you want to get.

Most of us who use cornies force carbonate using a CO2 tank. If you go this method with your keg, then to carbonate the bottles you'll have to find some way to prime the beer you are putting into the bottles, but not what you are putting into the keg. You can do this with carbonation "drops" or "pills". You can also wait until the keg is carbonated, then use a counterpressure bottle filler.

It really doesn't matter how much you bottle, although the emptier the keg the more gas you'll need to purge the headspace initially, so you'll go through your CO2 a bit faster.

Another thing to remember: if you don't have a dedicated cooling system (refrigerator, kegerator or chest freezer) then you have to crank up the CO2 pressure to achieve your desired carbonation level. Why? CO2 absorbs much faster, at lower pressures, in cold solution than in warm solution.
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Old 02-01-2006, 12:29 AM   #3
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Put the ale in your keg along with the primer. Attach CO2 and put a little pressure (3-4 psi) on the keg. Fill bottles with party tap & cap. Put keg in cool place.

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Old 02-01-2006, 08:26 AM   #4
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One last possibility is to prime your brew in the bottling bucket as usual, fill however many bottles you want then keg the rest. The keg and the bottles will naturally carbonate in the fermentation room.
You'll need to purge the O2 from the keg with CO2 and at the same time, put a little extra pressure (about 30#s) to help seal the keg. When purging the O2, drop the pressure in the keg to 10#s and let carbonate.


Good luck,
Wild
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Old 02-01-2006, 04:56 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wild
One last possibility is to prime your brew in the bottling bucket as usual, fill however many bottles you want then keg the rest. The keg and the bottles will naturally carbonate in the fermentation room.
You'll need to purge the O2 from the keg with CO2 and at the same time, put a little extra pressure (about 30#s) to help seal the keg. When purging the O2, drop the pressure in the keg to 10#s and let carbonate.


Good luck,
Wild

This sounds like a great option, would you mind describing how to go about purging the O2. This is done after kegging I assume, as O2 would obvioulsy get in during the process of transferring the beer to the keg.

Thanks
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Old 02-01-2006, 05:48 PM   #6
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To purge the O2 off first lock the valve on top the corny keg open. Blast about 30psi into keg. During this the O2 will escape through the valve. This process works because the CO2 is heavier than O2 thus allowing the keg to fill with CO2 from the beer surface up to the valve. This only takes a few minutes. Cheers!

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Old 02-02-2006, 04:02 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wild
One last possibility is to prime your brew in the bottling bucket as usual, fill however many bottles you want then keg the rest. The keg and the bottles will naturally carbonate in the fermentation room.
You'll need to purge the O2 from the keg with CO2 and at the same time, put a little extra pressure (about 30#s) to help seal the keg. When purging the O2, drop the pressure in the keg to 10#s and let carbonate.


Good luck,
Wild
The reason I don't like this option is that increases the sediment in the keg. Lots of folks get into kegging to decrease sediment. It's hardly every zero, of course, but by not priming when racking into a keg there is only a tiny, tiny amount of sediment, usually just in the first glass poured.
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Old 02-02-2006, 10:27 PM   #8
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Default keg and bottling

Quote:
Originally Posted by MNBugeater
Im about to bottle/keg my first brew ever (India Pale Ale).

I have a Corny Keg & CO2. I have bottles. Im ready...but I have a delima and a couple quesitons.

Is it possilbe to both bottle SOME and keg the rest? I'd lke to be able to take a few over to a buddies house and even keep a bottle for posterity. Yet Im looking to keg this for a party the end of February [assuming it turns out].

If I bottle 12, will there be TOO much extra room in the keg ?

Finally, I dont have a dedicated keg fridge yet. But I have two rooms in my house that stay around 63F-64F. Thats where ive been doing my secondary fermentation. I was going ot store the keg in there until its ready to be served. Will this work for storage? And finally, can I just cool down the keg a few hours prior to serving it ?

Thanks

MNBugeater
I always bottle a few in clear corona bottles (at leat 6) and keg the rest. I like being able to see the color, clarity etc as it ages and also have a quick 6 to carry along when I leave home to get evavuations with. Although I have just aquired a bunch of 3 gallon kegs to make that easier!

If you use clear bottles keep them in a light tite box the UV rays mess with beer.
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Old 02-03-2006, 12:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MNBugeater
This sounds like a great option, would you mind describing how to go about purging the O2. This is done after kegging I assume, as O2 would obvioulsy get in during the process of transferring the beer to the keg.

Thanks
Sorry this took so long. I could have sworn I answered this post yesterday.
After your keg is clean and dry, seal it and add a few pounds of CO2 in it. (2, 3, maybe 4) Let it sit while you get the rest of your tools cleaned and your secondary racked onto your priming sugar. As mentioned, air is lighter than CO2 and will be pushed out when you pull the preassure release valve on your keg. (This is purging the O2). Now that the preassure has been released, open the keg and fill it with the rest of your beer (after you've already filled your bottles). Since you had purged the O2 from the keg, all that is in it is CO2. As you rack your beer to it, CO2 will be pushed out. When done, close keg, increase CO2 preassure to 30#s to seal keg, release preassure to 10#s and put in conditioning room to carbonate.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bikebryan
The reason I don't like this option is that increases the sediment in the keg.
I'm not a big fan of sediment either but if you want a real ale or are trying to create a traditional brew, you'll have to put up with the first pint being yeast.

Good luck,
Wild
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  3. Robust Porter
  4. Russian Imperial Stout
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Old 02-04-2006, 04:54 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wild
Sorry this took so long. I could have sworn I answered this post yesterday.
After your keg is clean and dry, seal it and add a few pounds of CO2 in it. (2, 3, maybe 4) Let it sit while you get the rest of your tools cleaned and your secondary racked onto your priming sugar. As mentioned, air is lighter than CO2 and will be pushed out when you pull the preassure release valve on your keg. (This is purging the O2). Now that the preassure has been released, open the keg and fill it with the rest of your beer (after you've already filled your bottles). Since you had purged the O2 from the keg, all that is in it is CO2. As you rack your beer to it, CO2 will be pushed out. When done, close keg, increase CO2 preassure to 30#s to seal keg, release preassure to 10#s and put in conditioning room to carbonate.


I'm not a big fan of sediment either but if you want a real ale or are trying to create a traditional brew, you'll have to put up with the first pint being yeast.

Good luck,
Wild
Huh? If I understand what you are saying correctly, you are saying that only naturally carbonated beer is "real?"

The beer doesn't care where the CO2 comes from, be it from priming with sugar or force carbonating. CO2 is CO2 regardless of the source...the only real difference in the keg is the amount of sediment you'll get, not in flavor or "authenticity."
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