Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Kegerator Foam issue

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-13-2012, 11:17 PM   #1
centropy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 6
Default Kegerator Foam issue

Hey everyone.
I know that posts like this are dime a dozen but I really would appreciate any advice on my issue. I have a keg of Fat Tire that I just can't get to stop foaming.

First off my setup:
-5 feet of 3/16'' of vinyl tubing.
-tower tap with copper tubing going a foot into the kegerator to try to ensure equal cooling
-kegerator set at 37 degrees and 12psi

So the first pour is almost entirely foam. The second pour is usually regular, but if I wait 5 minutes until the next pour I'll get the foam again.

I've messed around with the psi a bunch and the only time I've gotten it with minimal foam is at a 6psi but the beer tasted a little flat after a while.

I realize it sounds like a tower cooling issue, but I honestly think its something else. How low of a psi can I use without it going flat? Any input would be greatly appreciated. Also- I can see bubbles in the tubing right outside of the keg before it goes up the tower.

__________________
centropy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 11:34 PM   #2
daksin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
daksin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,094
Liked 272 Times on 238 Posts
Likes Given: 323

Default

You're right that's probably not a tower cooling issue. Your lines are too short. Look up how to balance your draft system- you'll probably have to go to at least 10ft lines. All of my lines are 10ft and never foam. Your pours may be a little slower but you need the resistance of the lines to keep the CO2 in your beer- short lines = no resistance = foam.

__________________

I can't be arsed to keep up this list of what's in the fermenters, but hey, check out the cool brewery I own!

twitter.com/2kidsbrewing .. facebook.com/2kidsbrewing .. 2kidsbrewing.com

daksin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 11:36 PM   #3
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 60,585
Liked 4342 Times on 3157 Posts
Likes Given: 845

Default

I think it's the tower, and the short lines aren't helping.

The second glass pours ok, because the tower and lines are cooled by the first pour. That tells me it's a tower issue.

But because 5' of line is pretty short, I'd also consider longer lines.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-13-2012, 11:53 PM   #4
daksin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
daksin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,094
Liked 272 Times on 238 Posts
Likes Given: 323

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I think it's the tower, and the short lines aren't helping.

The second glass pours ok, because the tower and lines are cooled by the first pour. That tells me it's a tower issue.

But because 5' of line is pretty short, I'd also consider longer lines.
Ah yes- I missed that it was just the first pour- that means the first pour is cooling your lines and that's why the second pour is less foamy. You should probably fix both.
__________________

I can't be arsed to keep up this list of what's in the fermenters, but hey, check out the cool brewery I own!

twitter.com/2kidsbrewing .. facebook.com/2kidsbrewing .. 2kidsbrewing.com

daksin is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2012, 12:53 AM   #5
rubikcube
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Lubbock, TX
Posts: 11
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper
I think it's the tower, and the short lines aren't helping.

The second glass pours ok, because the tower and lines are cooled by the first pour. That tells me it's a tower issue.

But because 5' of line is pretty short, I'd also consider longer lines.
It could still be the line length. Before I had 10 foot lines, I had the exact same issue in a picnic tap. Since the tap was always in the fridge, it didn't have any cooling issues.

When you pour the first glass, the pressure inside the keg drops. The regulator hasn't been able to fully recover by the time the second glass is poured. This means that the second pour happens more slowly. However, five minutes later, the regulator is able to raise the pressure in the keg again. Most co2 regulators take some time to recover the previous pressure.
__________________
rubikcube is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2012, 01:05 AM   #6
zachattack
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: , MA
Posts: 2,450
Liked 233 Times on 201 Posts
Likes Given: 122

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubikcube View Post
When you pour the first glass, the pressure inside the keg drops. The regulator hasn't been able to fully recover by the time the second glass is poured. This means that the second pour happens more slowly. However, five minutes later, the regulator is able to raise the pressure in the keg again. Most co2 regulators take some time to recover the previous pressure.
A typical CO2 regulator should be able to continuously supply 30+ psi at a pretty hefty flow rate, it doesn't "take some time to recover." The keg will be back at your set pressure almost instantly after pouring, 1 second at the most. The amount of CO2 you'd need to inject to maintain, for example, 12 psi in the 12-20 ounces of beer you just pulled out is tiny. If your regulator and tank take minutes to pressurize a small vessel, something's very wrong.

OP, it might also help to find out how many volumes of CO2 New Belgium carbonates the keg at, and try to maintain the proper pressure at your system's temperature. If you're applying less pressure than you need to to maintain the carb level, CO2 can be slowly coming out of solution in the line to equalize the pressure. So if you don't pour for a few minutes, you can get bubbles building up in the serving line.
__________________
zachattack is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-14-2012, 05:57 PM   #7
JuanMoore
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JuanMoore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Old Pueblo
Posts: 16,133
Liked 3209 Times on 3113 Posts
Likes Given: 18

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I think it's the tower, and the short lines aren't helping.

The second glass pours ok, because the tower and lines are cooled by the first pour. That tells me it's a tower issue.

But because 5' of line is pretty short, I'd also consider longer lines.
Possibly, but the fact that he can see bubbles forming in the line just past the coupler suggests that there are additional issues.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zachattack View Post
OP, it might also help to find out how many volumes of CO2 New Belgium carbonates the keg at, and try to maintain the proper pressure at your system's temperature. If you're applying less pressure than you need to to maintain the carb level, CO2 can be slowly coming out of solution in the line to equalize the pressure. So if you don't pour for a few minutes, you can get bubbles building up in the serving line.
That's my guess too, especially since he said he can see the bubbles forming in the line.

OP, if you don't get a quick answer from New Belgium, you could try increasing the pressure 1 psi at a time until you no longer see the bubbles forming in the line. The problem you have is that increasing the serving pressure may end up being too much for your short serving line, so after correcting the one problem, you'll be faced with another. Another option would be to degas the keg until the carbonation level matches your serving pressure and temp.

Edit: According to the googles, Fat Tire is carbed to 2.5 vol, which means the pressure should be fine, assuming the temp is accurate. How/where are you measuring the temp? Can you check to see what the temp difference is between the bottom of the kegerator and the spot up high where the bubbles are forming in the line?
__________________
Keezer Soze

Yuri rubs it out with 60 grit... wouldn't even feel a tenga egg. -Randar

, place entry ox dixla to suck. Fcxk fwnpoo and passed. Hel an my spupid ass. OK. - TXCrash
JuanMoore is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Foam Issue JoeyNaples Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 01-06-2011 10:50 AM
Foam Issue edie Bottling/Kegging 8 11-17-2010 08:17 PM
Help diagnose my foam issue... Lando Bottling/Kegging 6 06-07-2009 02:15 AM
Haier kegerator conversion - foam baby foam... lilzaphod Bottling/Kegging 5 10-08-2008 04:22 PM
Foam issue Marbee777 Bottling/Kegging 30 09-28-2007 01:44 PM