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Old 04-11-2013, 02:19 PM   #681
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I'm still kind of a newb (only been brewing about 5 months, 8 batches) and am just about to get into kegging.

Looking for someone to correct me if I'm wrong. From what I know, burst carbing seems to be an entirely valid method depending on your setup. The two concerns I saw in the OP are possible overcarbonation and the beer not being aged enough, so "why burst carb at all?":

1.) Is it not possible to get approximately the volume of Co2 that you want by using a pressure gage connected to the gas-in? The process I plan to do is the standard shake-at-30-psi method, very conservatively, then detach the co2, shake the keg more, read pressure gage, and repeat until I get consistent readings (the carbonation will be in equilibrium and it should represent the pressure that's in solution). Then reattach the co2, and repeat the whole process, until I get the carbonation I want.

2.) If someone has a small/modestly-sized kegerator, and a decent amount of fermentation vessels, it doesn't seem at all to be poor planning to age the beer in the fermenters and burst carb carefully and accurately. In fact, that would seem to make the most efficient use of a kegging system by having only ready or almost ready (cold crashing, etc) beers hooked up. Kegging equipment gets expensive the more servicable kegs you add to the system. Buckets are cheap.

The first post in this thread seems very down on burst-carbing, but to me it seems that it can represent a great solution to make the most out of one's equipment. I'm posting this because I may be missing something, so if I am, please let me know!

Thanks!

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Old 04-13-2013, 03:30 PM   #682
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake8078 View Post

1.) Is it not possible to get approximately the volume of Co2 that you want by using a pressure gage connected to the gas-in? The process I plan to do is the standard shake-at-30-psi method, very conservatively, then detach the co2, shake the keg more, read pressure gage, and repeat until I get consistent readings (the carbonation will be in equilibrium and it should represent the pressure that's in solution). Then reattach the co2, and repeat the whole process, until I get the carbonation I want.
Shaking does force equilibrium faster than having it sit around, but it's very possible to end up reading a head space pressure that's higher or lower than the partial pressure of dissolved CO2. For your purposes, it could be close enough.


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2.) If someone has a small/modestly-sized kegerator, and a decent amount of fermentation vessels, it doesn't seem at all to be poor planning to age the beer in the fermenters and burst carb carefully and accurately. In fact, that would seem to make the most efficient use of a kegging system by having only ready or almost ready (cold crashing, etc) beers hooked up. Kegging equipment gets expensive the more servicable kegs you add to the system. Buckets are cheap.

The first post in this thread seems very down on burst-carbing, but to me it seems that it can represent a great solution to make the most out of one's equipment. I'm posting this because I may be missing something, so if I am, please let me know!

Thanks!
I wrote the first post and I am in the anti-burst camp, especially when it comes to the combination of elevated pressure and shaking. Just like anything else, much of this stuff is preference and opinion and this threaded started with mine. You don't have to agree. Many don't and have shared their methods in the thread.

To deal with pipeline issues, you can also use an aux tank/regulator and let them sit at the appropriate pressure for room temps or wherever you age your on deck kegs. There are also compromise solutions like non-shake elevated pressures (for short periods like 24 hours) and/or shaking at chart pressures. Certainly one of the benefits of the set and forget method is the long period of cold aging you're forced into and that really clears the beer well in cases where you can't cold crash or cold age the fermenters. If you really want to carb it quick and start drinking, I'd want to have a fermentation temp controlled area where you can let it ride at 35F for a week before transferring to keg.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:46 PM   #683
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Read about how shaking a bottle that is already in equilibrium doesn't change the pressure in the bottle. It forms bigger bubbles that explode to the surface when opened. Then in the IPA book read that, "If injecting CO2 to carbonate, do so gently to avoid forming large bubbles that strip hop flavor from the beer."

Putting these two together would make me think that shaking your hop forward beer kegs is a really bad idea.

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Old 04-14-2013, 03:16 PM   #684
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I set and forget at 12 psi and the keg gets very drinkable at 5 days, 7 and I'm digging in. The temp of your fridge is not the same as the temp of your beer. Put a glass if water in the fridge and test it with a liquid thermometer.

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Old 04-17-2013, 03:13 PM   #685
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Just to report back, I had great success with the 30 psi for two days, then reduce to serving psi method. Most definitely will be my modus operandi moving forward. I was drinking beer in 4 days from kegging and it tastes great. I now plan to pull a pint every day for the next couple weeks to check for improvement over time. Who am I kidding though, I'd be pulling those pints anyway, the improvement thing is just an excuse.
^^I posted the above in this thread back in June, 2012. I was all pumped up at the time but I felt the need to clarify my original statement. As the days went on, the beer got better. Sure enough, even using burst carb (or arguably a hybrid method), it was nearly 2 weeks before the beer reached what I would call ideal.

Moral of the story for me...I'll still use the 2 day method if I really need to get some beer in production. Otherwise, set it and forget it will be my mantra moving forward. Pretty much exactly what Bobby said in the OP is what I found to be true.
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Old 04-17-2013, 03:58 PM   #686
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^^I posted the above in this thread back in June, 2012. I was all pumped up at the time but I felt the need to clarify my original statement. As the days went on, the beer got better. Sure enough, even using burst carb (or arguably a hybrid method), it was nearly 2 weeks before the beer reached what I would call ideal.

Moral of the story for me...I'll still use the 2 day method if I really need to get some beer in production. Otherwise, set it and forget it will be my mantra moving forward. Pretty much exactly what Bobby said in the OP is what I found to be true.
You can lead a homebrewer to beer but you can't make him wait for it to peak.

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Old 05-04-2013, 04:28 AM   #687
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Bobby,
Thanks for taking the time to post this chart. I'm new to kegging and make my wife Non-alcoholic root beer pretty often too. The burst carbing method for the root beer completely elimiates the need for yeast and any possibility of alcohol in her drink. I for one certainly appreciate your efforts to make this hobby understandable for those of us who are less edumacated than others.

Wheelchair Bob

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Old 05-29-2013, 12:54 AM   #688
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Question about naturally carbing kegs here:

I'm putting beer in my first keg this week and I plan on using priming sugar because- I don't mind a little extra sediment, like the carbonation of the naturally carbed beers more, and anticipate getting co2 to be a pain in the a$$.

My concern is that if the keg is sealed with co2 before resting at room temperature for a couple weeks, are you purging the head space of the necessary o2 for the yeast to consume and carbonate the beer?

Also, any other advice or reasons not to use this technique I may have overlooked would be greatly appreciated! Thanks for the great info everybody, and especially BobbyM.

Andy

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Old 05-29-2013, 02:56 AM   #689
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The yeast don't need oxygen to produce carbon dioxide, so purging the headspace is perfectly safe. Also, not purging it is probably fine, since the yeast will consume whatever oxygen is there. Others might have other experience or reasoning, but that's my 2 cents. Cheers!

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Old 05-30-2013, 03:44 AM   #690
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When I naturally carb in my kegs, should I purge the O2 and apply enough pressure with the CO2 to insure I have a good seal. I did a non alcohol root beer and the keg didn't seem to seal tightly so it had no carbonation and tasted very slightly of alcohol. I poured out the batch because children and youngsters might have been exposed to drinking it and I didn't want to take a chance and end up giving alcohol to a child. Recommended procedure to insure the keg seals and the CO2 stays in solution?

Wheelchair Bob

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