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Old 07-28-2012, 02:01 PM   #591
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I used to force carb and it got me drinkable beer in short order, but it wasn't ideal. I did that when I was kegging at a friends house and we had a lot of people drinking the beer and it was hard to keep up with the consumption. Now that I got my own keggerator, I'm a set and forget convert. I just put it at 10-12 psi and give it a week. Sure, you can cheat and start to pull a beer off after a couple of days but it tastes best when it's at least a week out. I don't do much different for different styles, but that's probably the next thing I'm going to start paying attention to.
My beer was never fully carbed in a week going this route. More like 3 weeks. 2 days at 30 psi and then another 5 days at 12 psi gets me where I want to be
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Old 07-28-2012, 05:36 PM   #592
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My beer was never fully carbed in a week going this route. More like 3 weeks. 2 days at 30 psi and then another 5 days at 12 psi gets me where I want to be
Glad to see I'm not alone. I tried this, and then went right back to boosting my beer. To each their own I guess
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Old 07-28-2012, 06:32 PM   #593
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RogueGoose85 -

In word, NO. I don't think that anyone who is impatient enough to force carb (me for example) cares much about hitting stylistic CO2 volumes. Just getting down to drinking faster. . . It should be possible to more precisely calculate burst carb CO2, after all we're only talking about temp, pressure, and time, but I haven't seen anything.

The compromise would seem to be to use high pressure carbing to quickly get you close to the number, and then dial back and finish with the correct PSI. The only issue would be making sure you don't overshoot.

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Old 07-29-2012, 11:31 PM   #594
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For the stouts i think it matters a bit more especially if your pushing through with beer mix and a block plate faucet... Cause if you dont hit it right it will be too flat and i dont think the mix is absorbed... With all others styles i too use the 24 hour 30 psi and then i usually cut off co2 all together without releasing any pressure in the keg for a few days... Then its time to set to 10-12psi and relieve the pressure and pull one.. It usually does well...

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Old 08-07-2012, 09:40 PM   #595
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Hm, let's see who can help me get a solution for this:

I have a kegerator which I just recently equipped with a second faucet and a two way CO2 manifold. I've deduced that I really only have two options to carb.

Given this situation: I have one keg already on tap, properly carbed, and at the normal 10-12psi serving pressure... now I want to carb my keg that just finished fermenting.

Method #1: attach second air line to new keg. Apply CO2, relieve, repeat (purge O2). Turn off this lines CO2. Rack beer into keg, secure lid. Allow to cool to 37F. open the new kegs valve on the manifold (12psi is now applied to the beer). Leave for 2-3 weeks to slowly carbonate at 12psi.

Method #2: attach second air line to new keg. open the new kegs CO2 manifold valve and apply 12psi CO2, relieve, repeat (purge O2). Turn off the new kegs CO2. Rack beer into keg. Let keg cool to 37F. Turn off the CO2 to the keg currently in operation, and open the valve for the new keg. Up gas to 30psi, and roll the keg on the lap for 10-15 mins while the pressure is applied. Purge the keg to release pressure. Drop regulator pressure to 12psi. Make sure both manifold valves are open. Let sit for a week for complete carbonation.

I was hoping I could have the keg sit for 24-48 hours at 30psi as this seemed like the quickest most effective and foolproof method, but this would force me to shut off the air to the currently working keg (otherwise overcarbonation would occur). If I did do this, would anything happen to the currently kegged beer? It wouldn't go flat right? (theres no oxygen in there... so why would it?). I guess it would just mean that no one could drink it!

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Old 08-08-2012, 01:03 PM   #596
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Originally Posted by RogueGoose85 View Post
to all who are trying to find out a quicker way to carb (ie, 50 psi for 20 hours, or 30 psi for 36, etc etc), how confident are you that you are actually hitting those correct carbonation volumes? Obviously, each style has a recommended serving temp and carb level. To those who are trying to rush things and find shortcuts, are you just "happy" with whatever carbonation you deem appropriate? Carbonation levels can make or break a great beer.

Trust me, and I am with you, I would love to be able to carb up a keg in a day or so, but for an english mild at ~ 1.5 volumes, i would be so nervous to overshoot that, and thus go through the dreaded fixing phase which imo just wastes so much beer (at least in my experience when I use to burst carb)

Does it matter on style for you guys? or is it just whatever beer you have, you're OK with the carb levels that you hit. Either way is fine of course, haha, its your beer, and I would never tell someone to do something different. I am just curious.
No offense man, but the tone of your comments/question is kinda off. Like people who have the skill to boost carb aren't as savvy a beer snob as you. Just the same I will assume you didn't have a bad intention.

The answer to this yes for me, I carb to style using boost techniques. I am not happy with a beer unless I am carbing to the level it should be (carb levels make a huge impact on a brews presentation). Boosting for a general amount of time will get you more or less carbed. With experience you can control your outcome very closely because carbing even with a boost method takes hours (usually 24 hours or more) and not minutes. If you have read this thread you would have seen that many people do this with great success.

You don't get brownie points for waiting 3 weeks for your beer to carb (it doesn't make your beer taste better). Boosting isn't a shortcut, it is a repeatable method and skill you should strive to achieve.
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Old 08-09-2012, 05:22 PM   #597
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No offense man, but the tone of your comments/question is kinda off. Like people who have the skill to boost carb aren't as savvy a beer snob as you. Just the same I will assume you didn't have a bad intention.

The answer to this yes for me, I carb to style using boost techniques. I am not happy with a beer unless I am carbing to the level it should be (carb levels make a huge impact on a brews presentation). Boosting for a general amount of time will get you more or less carbed. With experience you can control your outcome very closely because carbing even with a boost method takes hours (usually 24 hours or more) and not minutes. If you have read this thread you would have seen that many people do this with great success.

You don't get brownie points for waiting 3 weeks for your beer to carb (it doesn't make your beer taste better). Boosting isn't a shortcut, it is a repeatable method and skill you should strive to achieve.
Carbing makes one a beer snob now?!

Seems like a straightforward question to me, does it work for you or not, in terms of hitting carb numbers.

This board has gone ham lately with "no one knows more than me" comments. It's a shame, there used to be a lot of useful discussion on here.

As far as boosting being a repeatable method that everyone should "strive" to achieve, that sounds like an opinion to me. Does that make you a beer snob then?
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Old 08-09-2012, 06:34 PM   #598
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Carbing makes one a beer snob now?!

Seems like a straightforward question to me, does it work for you or not, in terms of hitting carb numbers.

This board has gone ham lately with "no one knows more than me" comments. It's a shame, there used to be a lot of useful discussion on here.

As far as boosting being a repeatable method that everyone should "strive" to achieve, that sounds like an opinion to me. Does that make you a beer snob then?
Being called a beer snob is a complement (someone who appreciates all the aspects of a well crafted beer from nose, to carb to finish). Point was that a good boost carber can produce the same cabing result as a set and forget carber - he can be just as good a beer snob.

It is my opinion that any brewer should "strive" to learn all facets of brewing, including force and natural carbing methods.

As for the rest of your post it doesn't make any sense. The only one haming it up is you.
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Old 08-09-2012, 07:09 PM   #599
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I have never carbed (yet!), but from the point of view of dissolving a gas, it shouldn't make a difference which way you carb it, only the temperature, pressure, and time the gas is applied for. The only thing that is really of concern is that blast carbing it makes it much easier to over-carb, much as carbing for 2 days at 30psi is easier to over-carb than leaving the keg at 12psi for 3 weeks. You're taking a risk to get there sooner, and for some people its worth it.

Personally, I'm hoping to boost carb it. If the keg is at my fridges temperature, and I set it to the same pressure every time, and my desired vols of CO2 are the same, then as long as i roll evenly for the same amount of time, I should get the exact same results... simple as that. I've read mannnny of these posts, and quite a few people do it this way as well. They may be like me (dont own a dual product regulator, but a two-way manifold), so they either need to boost carb while cutting of CO2 to the other keg, or decide to wait 2-3 weeks for it to carb at 12psi.

RyanDe680, I think that most people who boost carb are hitting their levels. If not immediately, then within a week at 12psi it'll get there. All the process does is expedite the carbing process, and as long as they don't over carb on the initial burst, then they will always hit it. Its kind of like watching a movie to see a specific scene; all they are doing is fast forwarding. If they stop before, they'll just need to watch at regular speed (12psi) until they get there, if they pass it, they'll need to rewind (however this is much more of a PITA than rewinding a DVD!).

just my 0.02. I think it should produce the same quality beer, the only difference is that the boost carbed beer will be at carbonation levels faster, so when drank right away the beer will be younger. I suspect if you waited the same amount of time the other methods take to reach their carb levels, the taste will be spot on identical.

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Old 08-09-2012, 07:28 PM   #600
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JayMac - well said. You pretty much hit the nail of the head. Control the temp, pressure, time applied and you will be able to sort out the level of carb fairly reasonably, time and time again.

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