*Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway - Enter Now!*

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg Force Carbing Methods Illustrated
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 06-24-2012, 04:30 AM   #581
wattershed
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 7
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kehaar View Post
The high pressure gauge is basically a thermometer. The pressure depends on temperature. It dropped because the co2 in your tank got cold. It will stay at that pressure without changing for months(as long as the co2 stays the same temperature) then drop like a rock to zero when the tank empties.
How utterly useless. There must be some applications where that gauge is useful, but I'm gathering that the homebrew world and the place where that gauge is an asset don't intersect.

Thanks for the response!
__________________
wattershed is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2012, 03:16 PM   #582
brewvall
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 26
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default some confusion carbing

according to http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php

at 38 degrees F my beer needs 12 lbs of psi to reach 2.57% carbonation

or is it at 38 degrees F my beer needs 2.57 psi to reach my estimated carbonation level in 12 days

I'm quite confused in this chart I have only "burst" carbed before, and I'm looking on getting a specific carbonation level for my competition brew.

a couple questions I have

how long do i leave my beer carbonating?
are the numbers at the top of the table from 1-30 my psi?
what do the numbers in the colors representing?

I don't know how how many people visit this sticky so I will be posting this in the general beer forums, I'm quite distressed. I was looking to start carbing early today

__________________
brewvall is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-25-2012, 03:26 PM   #583
alestateyall
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 735
Liked 88 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

You need to set your pressure to 12psi to achieve 2.57 volumes co2 (carbonation level).

You should leave it at 12 PSI until you finish drinking it.

It is best to wait 2-3 weeks before drinking. It takes that time to carb up and let the sediment drop out.

The numbers in the colored area of the chart are volumes of co2.

Good luck.

__________________
alestateyall is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2012, 02:51 AM   #584
Peloton
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Auburn, Wa
Posts: 3
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kehaar View Post
You need to set your pressure to 12psi to achieve 2.57 volumes co2 (carbonation level).

You should leave it at 12 PSI until you finish drinking it.

It is best to wait 2-3 weeks before drinking. It takes that time to carb up and let the sediment drop out.

The numbers in the colored area of the chart are volumes of co2.

Good luck.
That makes sense, but if I leave my co2 at 12psi I'm pouring straight foam out of my tap. What am I missing or doing wrong?
__________________
Peloton is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2012, 03:19 AM   #585
alestateyall
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 735
Liked 88 Times on 57 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peloton

That makes sense, but if I leave my co2 at 12psi I'm pouring straight foam out of my tap. What am I missing or doing wrong?
Some things to try:

1. Make sure you are opening the tap all the way. Don't half open the tap to slow the pour. That causes tons of foam. Open all the way and fill until you think you are about to overflow. Then close the tap quickly. That is counter intuitive but true. It is also different than serving keg beer at a kegger where there is no co2 pressure just a hand pump.

2. How long are your lines? When I started kegging mine were 5 feet long. I would get 3/4th glass of foam. Going to 10' really helped. When I had 5' lines I turned the pressure down to 3-4PSI when serving. Burp the keg before the first pour though. Then turn back up when done serving. You can leave at 3-4PSI for a few days without any problems.

3. Did you accidentally over carb? If you used the shake method or set to high pressure for a short period (1-2 days) you could have over carbed. If that is the case there are ways to back down the carbonation. Basically you disconnect the gas and burp your keg every 1-3 hours until the beer is back to a servable pressure.

4. There are other possibilities like warm lines.

I hope this helps.
__________________
alestateyall is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-06-2012, 01:33 PM   #586
Peloton
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Auburn, Wa
Posts: 3
Default

[quote=kehaar;4228683]Some things to try:

1. Make sure you are opening the tap all the way. Don't half open the tap to slow the pour. That causes tons of foam. Open all the way and fill until you think you are about to overflow. Then close the tap quickly. That is counter intuitive but true. It is also different than serving keg beer at a kegger where there is no co2 pressure just a hand pump. -----I'll give this a try.

2. How long are your lines? When I started kegging mine were 5 feet long. I would get 3/4th glass of foam. Going to 10' really helped. When I had 5' lines I turned the pressure down to 3-4PSI when serving. Burp the keg before the first pour though. Then turn back up when done serving. You can leave at 3-4PSI for a few days without any problems. ------the lines in my kegerator are about 5 feet also. I'll see about replacing them with longer lines.

3. Did you accidentally over carb? If you used the shake method or set to high pressure for a short period (1-2 days) you could have over carbed. If that is the case there are ways to back down the carbonation. Basically you disconnect the gas and burp your keg every 1-3 hours until the beer is back to a servable pressure. -----I don't think this is my problem as my foaming trouble has been consistent with all my home-brewed and commercial kegs.

4. There are other possibilities like warm lines. -----kegerator and tower are well insulated, don't think this is the trouble.

I hope this helps.-----thanks for the input, I'll make some adjustments and see what helps./quote]

__________________
Peloton is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-08-2012, 01:04 PM   #587
flabyboy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Dover, MN
Posts: 948
Liked 10 Times on 10 Posts

Default

Definitely get longer lines. 9-10 ft should do it. Makes sure its the thick walled beer lines. Not the ones that often come with the picnic taps from some retailers

__________________
flabyboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-27-2012, 09:15 PM   #588
RogueGoose85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 141
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

to all who are trying to find out a quicker way to carb (ie, 50 psi for 20 hours, or 30 psi for 36, etc etc), how confident are you that you are actually hitting those correct carbonation volumes? Obviously, each style has a recommended serving temp and carb level. To those who are trying to rush things and find shortcuts, are you just "happy" with whatever carbonation you deem appropriate? Carbonation levels can make or break a great beer.

Trust me, and I am with you, I would love to be able to carb up a keg in a day or so, but for an english mild at ~ 1.5 volumes, i would be so nervous to overshoot that, and thus go through the dreaded fixing phase which imo just wastes so much beer (at least in my experience when I use to burst carb)

Does it matter on style for you guys? or is it just whatever beer you have, you're OK with the carb levels that you hit. Either way is fine of course, haha, its your beer, and I would never tell someone to do something different. I am just curious.

__________________
RogueGoose85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-27-2012, 09:18 PM   #589
RogueGoose85
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 141
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

can someone make a calculator? Inputs: Serving Temp, line length and diameter, and desired vols (im sure im missing something). Outputs: Burst carb PSI levels and time. that would be awesome (joking of course, but would be neat)

__________________
RogueGoose85 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 07-27-2012, 09:37 PM   #590
D-urb
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 32
Default

I used to force carb and it got me drinkable beer in short order, but it wasn't ideal. I did that when I was kegging at a friends house and we had a lot of people drinking the beer and it was hard to keep up with the consumption. Now that I got my own keggerator, I'm a set and forget convert. I just put it at 10-12 psi and give it a week. Sure, you can cheat and start to pull a beer off after a couple of days but it tastes best when it's at least a week out. I don't do much different for different styles, but that's probably the next thing I'm going to start paying attention to.

__________________
D-urb is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Force Carbing in a day? skeeordye11 Bottling/Kegging 7 01-19-2009 03:18 PM
Force Carbing Dominator6 Bottling/Kegging 5 05-04-2008 04:05 AM
how much force carbing? ski36t Bottling/Kegging 4 03-30-2007 02:59 PM
Force Carbing? MilwaukeesBus Bottling/Kegging 9 03-14-2007 10:07 PM
Need help with force carbing Craig5_12 Bottling/Kegging 21 03-03-2007 03:36 PM