Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Last Sponsor Giveaway of the Year!

Come Enter the BrewDeals/FastFerment Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg Force Carbing Methods Illustrated
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-24-2012, 09:36 PM   #531
CidahMastah
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
CidahMastah's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , New York
Posts: 4,266
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberMonk View Post

I'm curious: might a couple days at a higher PSI, followed by 4-5 days at serving pressure, act as an effective means of speeding up the set it and forget it method of keg carbing?
See my post #503, I have a very similar method I describe very clearly there. It takes me about 24hrs to have a carb good enough to drink, and stable in 3-5 days right where I want it with that procedure. I call it boost carbing. But there is no shaking involved.
__________________

Man,... That's a lotta hooch!
Steel rig in progress
ebuild info

CidahMastah is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2012, 10:12 PM   #532
Brewer3401
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brewer3401's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Southeast Louisiana
Posts: 1,351
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberMonk View Post
Quick question I'm hoping someone can shed some light on:

I erroneously left my freshly kegged Franziskaner clone at 28 PSI for a couple days (no shaking, just set it and left it) before dropping it down to 18 PSI. Now, a week later (2 days at 28 PSI and 5 days at 18 PSI), I wasn't expecting it to be ready carbonation-wise given the time it took with the Pliny clone I put on at 12 PSI, but lo and behold it actually already tastes and feels great!

I'm curious: might a couple days at a higher PSI, followed by 4-5 days at serving pressure, act as an effective means of speeding up the set it and forget it method of keg carbing?

(P.S. With 10 foot lines 18 PSI is pushing the the limits of serving pressure for my setup, but I've found that if I half or three-quarters cock the tap handle, I can still get a really nice pour with a solid but not excessive head; I have the Pliny clone at 14 PSI now, as the original 12 PSI poured a little slow and after two weeks was not carbed enough for my tastes).
Good thought. I will do either 2 or 3 days at 30 psi at 34 F, then drop to 12 psi for the remainder of a total of 7 days and test the beer.

I think I read shaking to carbonate can cause "fish eyes", but did shake 3 times early on kegging, and never got them - fish eyes are are some sort of contamination I believe.
__________________

Fermenter: Blonde Ale
Brite tank: -0-
Kegged: -0-

Brewer3401 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-24-2012, 10:31 PM   #533
CyberMonk
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CyberMonk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Berkeley, CA
Posts: 54
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Thanks much, CidahMastah! This should be especially helpful for beers like this hefe that can be enjoyed young without affecting the flavor much.

Say I try this method again around 30 PSI for a couple days, followed by serving pressure to round up to a week: is burping the keg necessary (I'm not sure that I did this time, though I honestly can't recall) or can I just turn down the pressure on the regulator without detaching the gas line? I guess I'm just unclear as to the physics of what might occur if I just leave the line attached and adjust the pressure downward.

__________________
CyberMonk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-25-2012, 08:12 AM   #534
tektonjp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: ohmihachiman, Japan
Posts: 692
Liked 63 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 55

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewer3401 View Post
Good thought. I will do either 2 or 3 days at 30 psi at 34 F, then drop to 12 psi for the remainder of a total of 7 days and test the beer.

I think I read shaking to carbonate can cause "fish eyes", but did shake 3 times early on kegging, and never got them - fish eyes are are some sort of contamination I believe.
The only fish eye contamination I know of, speaking as a woodworker, is during the finishing process of a piece. Never heard of a contamination called this in brewing. What is it?
__________________

"Beer, well respected and rightly consumed, can be a gift of God. It is one of his mysteries, which it was his delight to conceal and the glory of kings to search out."

The Search for God and Guinness by Stephen Mansfield

tektonjp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 02:55 AM   #535
Heavyfoot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 81
Default

FWIW, for those who don't cold crash I've used the following method for my last four beers in a row with success.

1. Put keg just filled with room temp beer in the kegerator (temp of my kegerator is 40 degrees F).
2. Set gas to 50 PSI (don't hook up the pouring line yet if you're using picnic taps - mine leak when under this much pressure).
3. Just less than a day later (~20 hours), turn gas off, burp, turn gas back on at serving pressure and hook up the pouring line.

The beer is at a pretty drinkable carbonation level already. It gets better with age, but if you want to drink the beer in a hurry, this method has worked great for me.

I know others have already described similar methods, but wanted to give a +1.

__________________
Heavyfoot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 03:22 AM   #536
Haputanlas
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 2,970
Liked 57 Times on 56 Posts
Likes Given: 38

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Heavyfoot View Post
FWIW, for those who don't cold crash I've used the following method for my last four beers in a row with success.

1. Put keg just filled with room temp beer in the kegerator (temp of my kegerator is 40 degrees F).
2. Set gas to 50 PSI (don't hook up the pouring line yet if you're using picnic taps - mine leak when under this much pressure).
3. Just less than a day later (~20 hours), turn gas off, burp, turn gas back on at serving pressure and hook up the pouring line.

The beer is at a pretty drinkable carbonation level already. It gets better with age, but if you want to drink the beer in a hurry, this method has worked great for me.

I know others have already described similar methods, but wanted to give a +1.
I don't understand where this applies to those who don't cold crash. Am I missing something?

Also, If you don't cold crash you are essentially cold crashing after the keg has been in the kegerator for any period of time at 40 or lower. Then, you would just have to server a pint or two of sediment. Pretty similar to cold crashing.

I've run into many homebrews where people were disappointed with their beer because they were judging the beer off of the first pour or two. It's very obvious with the clarity and yeast bitterness.


But to your carbonation method, this could definitely work. I am just not comfortable with my used cornies at 50 PSI. Just a fear of mine (Although nothing wrong with it).
__________________

"There is no strong beer, only weak men"
"Pretty women make us BUY beer, ugly women make us DRINK beer" - Al Bundy
"Give a man a beer, he'll drink for a day. Teach a man to brew, he'll be drunk for the rest of his life."

Primary: Viking Metal, Berliner Weisse
Kegged: Oaked English Mild, Modus Hoperandi
Bottled: None
Notable Empties: Oaked Black IIPA, BBK I, Red IIPA, Burning Bush, Apophis "The Destroyer", Vanilla Porter
On-Deck: Hobbit Ale, The Titan BW, Ale of Olympus

Haputanlas is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 04:36 AM   #537
Sippin37
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
Sippin37's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 916
Liked 30 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 48

Default

I think he is just saying that the beer is starting out at room temp and therefore wont be at 40F for the full 20 hrs. Thus, it won't carbonate as much as it would if it were at 40F before going into the keg from the cold crash.

__________________
"24 hours in a day, 24 beers in a case. Coincidence?"
-- Stephen Wright
Sippin37 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 05:10 AM   #538
Heavyfoot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 81
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sippin37 View Post
I think he is just saying that the beer is starting out at room temp and therefore wont be at 40F for the full 20 hrs. Thus, it won't carbonate as much as it would if it were at 40F before going into the keg from the cold crash.
Yup, that's what I was getting at. Guess I didn't really need to bring cold crashing into it, but I'm not sure this method wouldn't overcarbonate if you started with cold beer. If you cold crash but let the beer warm up before you keg it, you're good to go.
__________________
Heavyfoot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 05:14 AM   #539
Heavyfoot
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Winnipeg, MB
Posts: 81
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Haputanlas View Post
But to your carbonation method, this could definitely work. I am just not comfortable with my used cornies at 50 PSI. Just a fear of mine (Although nothing wrong with it).
Aren't cornies good up to 130PSI or so? I'm more concerned about the seals on my lines not being able to handle the pressure than my kegs. Would hate to come back a day later to an empty CO2 tank. But I do it, so I guess I'm not that concerned.
__________________
Heavyfoot is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-10-2012, 01:17 PM   #540
CidahMastah
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 2 reviews
 
CidahMastah's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: , New York
Posts: 4,266
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CyberMonk View Post
Thanks much, CidahMastah! This should be especially helpful for beers like this hefe that can be enjoyed young without affecting the flavor much.

Say I try this method again around 30 PSI for a couple days, followed by serving pressure to round up to a week: is burping the keg necessary (I'm not sure that I did this time, though I honestly can't recall) or can I just turn down the pressure on the regulator without detaching the gas line? I guess I'm just unclear as to the physics of what might occur if I just leave the line attached and adjust the pressure downward.
You only need to burp the keg if you boost carb then want to serve the next day. i.e. if you unhook you still have a keg with 60psi or 50 or 30 or whatever. Burping just vents the keg so you serve at say 12psi or whatever you set for serving.

So if you adjust downward and hook up, your beer will be serving at the boost carb pressure until it vents down to the serving pressure.

If you turn off and let sit at serving pressure for a week or so it should all stabilize out on its own. But what is the point of boost carbing if you plan on letting it sit at serving pressure for 2 weeks?

hefes are a great example of a brew you want to carb highly, and quickly so you can drink young. A great reason to try this method.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sippin37 View Post
I think he is just saying that the beer is starting out at room temp and therefore wont be at 40F for the full 20 hrs. Thus, it won't carbonate as much as it would if it were at 40F before going into the keg from the cold crash.
I do the same, start with a warm keg. This is why I noted that because the assumption would be a cold keg left at 50PSI would absorb more co2 than a warm in 20 hours or so. How much? You go me there...


To the OP concern, cornies are good up to 130PSI as heavyfoot stated. I disconnect my beer lines as well, but I have left them in on occasion and mine haven't leaked.

So let me just restate this again.... I have been using this method for well over 1.5 years to carb my and my cobrewer's beers. IT IS SAFE AND RELIABLE - That isn't up for debate, it is a fact. The only boogie man or voodoo attached to this method is that which other posters are adding. All the equipment is designed for 130psi, which probably means that it is good for at least twice that. The only weak point would be where you connected your lines to the QD's, if you didn't do a good job then that is on you. In a previous life all these kegs saw high pressures when serving sodas.
__________________

Man,... That's a lotta hooch!
Steel rig in progress
ebuild info

CidahMastah is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Force Carbing in a day? skeeordye11 Bottling/Kegging 7 01-19-2009 04:18 PM
Force Carbing Dominator6 Bottling/Kegging 5 05-04-2008 05:05 AM
how much force carbing? ski36t Bottling/Kegging 4 03-30-2007 03:59 PM
Force Carbing? MilwaukeesBus Bottling/Kegging 9 03-14-2007 11:07 PM
Need help with force carbing Craig5_12 Bottling/Kegging 21 03-03-2007 04:36 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS