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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg Force Carbing Methods Illustrated
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Old 05-28-2010, 10:35 AM   #151
Travis31
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Originally Posted by airmike View Post
What I got out of this thread in the most basic of terms:
Chill Keg (38-42 degrees)
Place at 30psi for 24 hours
Purge and Reset to 10-12psi
Wait 5 days + and Serve!
This is what i think i am going to do with my next batch.
I tried shaking my last one and it didn't help, I still had to wait till it panned out.
I will let you know how this one comes out. It is a Porter and I do plan on bottling some so my friends can try.

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Old 05-28-2010, 03:27 PM   #152
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great thread, lots of excellent info.

quick question, does the space left from putting a 6.5 gallon batch into a 10gallon corny affect anything?

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Old 06-12-2010, 05:16 AM   #153
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Quick question!

I have a beer very similar to the one described in the first post. It's at 45 degrees and I want to carb it to 2.5 volumes. The chart I have (in the back of BCS) says to use 15 PSI.

Can I set my regulator at 15 PSI, shake the keg until I don't hear anything else going in and be all set? What's the difference between setting at 15PSI and shaking and setting at a higher pressure, shaking and guessing a bit where it's going to end up.

I'd like to be able to take a growler of this stuff to a brew day on Sunday, but it's not the end of the world if I don't/can't.

Thanks

Matt

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Old 06-12-2010, 05:48 AM   #154
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Originally Posted by Matt_and_Katie View Post
Quick question!

I have a beer very similar to the one described in the first post. It's at 45 degrees and I want to carb it to 2.5 volumes. The chart I have (in the back of BCS) says to use 15 PSI.

Can I set my regulator at 15 PSI, shake the keg until I don't hear anything else going in and be all set? What's the difference between setting at 15PSI and shaking and setting at a higher pressure, shaking and guessing a bit where it's going to end up.

I'd like to be able to take a growler of this stuff to a brew day on Sunday, but it's not the end of the world if I don't/can't.

Thanks

Matt
If you shake a keg your asking for foaming problems. It will never be PROPERLY carbed by Sunday, it will take two weeks minimum. Be patient, it will be worth it. If you get the urge to shake a beer, buy miller lite and shake it.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:00 AM   #155
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Here is what I would do to be ready by Sunday. Chill your beer! 18 to 24 hours should get it fully chilled to the temperature you intend to serve it at. Then roll the sucker. Hopefully you have check valves to protect you regulator and gauges from possible liquid traveling up the lines. Even better: you have check valves out at the gas disconnect so no beer gets in the line and goes sour over time. But a few feet of air hose is cheap. You can replace it. If you have no check valves, don’t roll you keg and; get some check valves!
Assuming you are good to roll your kegs, then roll them. The liquid dip tube serves beer off the bottom of the keg, and so you can pour a beer immediately after rolling the keg for 10 minutes and the main thing you will experience is a bit of extra pressure that might foam up a bit in the glass because of that. You can hit the pressure release if this becomes an issue. Otherwise you can roll at the pressure and temperature you intend to serve at, and, at least if you are pouring with a picnic tap you should be fine. If you have real taps, I guess I don’t know, but it seems at worst you would have to adjust the length of your beer line to balance the system.

Your beer will not be at its prime, and will have yeast flavors, it will be cloudy and so forth, but it will be carbonated and as drinkable as it can be given the time frame. Roll it, pour it, drink it, and if it passes your appraisal, fill a couple growlers. If not and I am wrong, well, you can curse me and you will know to ask your LHBS in the future, I suppose. But I think you will have growlers to drink on Sunday.

And yes, ideally, be patient and don’t rush the carbonation of your beer. It will be at its prime when it is at its prime. But that is not really the question you were asking, now, is it? FOAMING will not be a big issue. Roll it until the gas stops, and then for another minute or two.

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Old 06-12-2010, 05:47 PM   #156
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Another non-believing shaker here. Whoever invents a way to measure carbonation will get my $100 for their tool..

AHS Honey Hibiscus wit
racked to keg yesterday at 5pm.
Gave 15 psi, then purged off any existing air
cold crashed to 42 or so, then side shook on 15psi for 30 minutes and returned to fridge.

Tested today, no carb at all really.

Now at 30psi until about this time tomorrow and will see whats up. Might bump it down to 15psi in the morning or late tonight if I test it and have some carb.

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Old 06-12-2010, 06:03 PM   #157
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You guys that think you can carb a beer over night are funny. Keep on shaking rolling, and cranking up that psi. Do you really want to spend hours and hours brewing a beer, then rush one of the most important aspects of the whole process? If you can't plan ahead/be more patient, it's time for a new hobby.

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Old 06-12-2010, 06:04 PM   #158
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildwest450 View Post
You guys that think you can carb a beer over night are funny. Keep on shaking rolling, and cranking up that psi. Do you really want to spend hours and hours brewing a beer, then rush one of the most important aspects of the whole process? If you can't plan ahead/be more patient, it's time for a new hobby.
Yea, I kind of expected this kind of response.

I know Im rushing it... but we really wanted to try this beer this weekend. It LOOKS awesome.
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:03 AM   #159
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrislehr View Post
Another non-believing shaker here. Whoever invents a way to measure carbonation will get my $100 for their tool..

AHS Honey Hibiscus wit
racked to keg yesterday at 5pm.
Gave 15 psi, then purged off any existing air
cold crashed to 42 or so, then side shook on 15psi for 30 minutes and returned to fridge.

Tested today, no carb at all really.

Now at 30psi until about this time tomorrow and will see whats up. Might bump it down to 15psi in the morning or late tonight if I test it and have some carb.
Blow down keg.
Take 3 readings of beer temp and take average
Start SLOWLY pressuring up on keg
When you hear the beer taking CO2, take the psi reading
Go to carb chart and work backwards
You know the beer temp and pressure - look on the chart

It will be close - you should maybe use 1 psi less than you show on your gauge because there will be a little lag in your hearing the gas going into the beer and when it actually hit equalibrium.

I know I spelled that wrong - sorry.
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Old 06-16-2010, 08:58 PM   #160
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Is there any benefit to shaking the keg at chart pressure (e.g. 12 psi in the example in the OP)? Will that decrease the carbonation time without having to overpressure the keg?

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