Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg conditioning temperature
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-20-2006, 04:52 PM   #11
Desert_Sky
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Desert_Sky's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ
Posts: 4,090
Liked 35 Times on 32 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kornkob
Treat kegged beer just like you'd treat bottled beer and you can't go wrong. Beer is beer--- it doesn't really care what kind of container it is in.

This is what Ive been doing. I keg the beer, hit it with 20 psi or so and throw it in the same closet I used to put my bottles in to let it age.

I recall a post a while back saying that beer needs CO2 to start the aging process.
__________________
Desert Sky Brewing Co.
Sierra Vista, AZ
Desert_Sky is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-24-2006, 02:52 PM   #12
jma99
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jma99's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Duluth, MN, You Betcha!
Posts: 375
Liked 14 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default Prime that keg!

I prime all my kegs.

I don't hook up the CO2 until I have to. I like "cask conditioned ale"!

Also, you save a bunch on CO2, and I think I get a creamier head from priming.

But as with most things in life "Youe mileage may vary"

__________________
jma99 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-24-2006, 07:58 PM   #13
Denny's Evil Concoctions
Grande Megalomaniac
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Denny's Evil Concoctions's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: West Kelowna BC, Canada
Posts: 7,767
Liked 51 Times on 42 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dougjones31
The some of you are not aging your beer correctly.

Carbon Dioxide mixes with the beer and forms several compounds. Carbonic Acid being one of them. Your beer needs these compounds to be able to age properly. These compounds help with the mellowing by acually destroying unwanted flavors and mellowing other flavors. The compounds are acids after all. Carbonation also changes the PH of the beer which also affects aging.

Do you think you can age wine uncarbonated and then shoot some co2 to it and drink it right away? Is cheap wine in a box good?

I completely disagree and so do some award winning brewers that think aging in the bottle is not as good as aging in a carboy. Aging in the carboy allows certain compunds to disapate out the air lock.

I brew the way I like and you brew the way you like. But don't tell me I have not been aging my beer properly.

And since when does anyone drink wine carbonated other than sparkling wine?? Wine gets DE-Carbonated then aged.
__________________

I may not be an expert, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express........ 6 months ago.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/denn...9/#post1766281

http://groups.homebrewtalk.com/Tapro...ook_Repository


Denny's Evil Concoctions is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-24-2006, 09:59 PM   #14
alemonkey
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 860
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Real brewers ALWAYS age their beer properly.

And they don't use bleach


__________________
alemonkey is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-24-2006, 10:21 PM   #15
david_42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
david_42's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Willamina & Oak Grove, Oregon, USA
Posts: 25,654
Liked 135 Times on 128 Posts

Default

Ales will age well 40-75F. Cooler means slower. I keep my kegs around 50F, becauses it's an easy temperature for me to maintain in my keg locker. Before I built the locker, they stayed in the house at 65-75F. Since I keg from the primary, my ales tend to carbonate somewhat during the aging process. I'll burp them before puting them in the kegger on pressure.

Real ale is never carbonated & some guys will fight to the death about it. Strange how women never seem to get wound-up about this stuff.

Ask wine growers the same question and the answer is always whatever the local caves maintain is the perfect and only temperature!

__________________

Remember one unassailable statistic, as explained by the late, great George Carlin: "Just think of how stupid the average person is, and then realize half of them are even stupider!"

"I would like to die on Mars, just not on impact." Elon Musk


david_42 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2006, 07:12 PM   #16
rcd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 103
Default

What's confusing here, is... people say, treat kegged beer the same as you would bottled beer...

But if I recall, after you prime and bottle beer, you have to let it carbonate at room temp. Whereas people who are kegging will track from the secondary, into the keg, and then put it into the fridge to force carb.

So in bottling, you are conditioning for 2+ weeks (after secondary fermentation) at room temp.

In kegging, you are conditioning for however long, after secondary, at fridge temp.

There is a difference there... and I think that is what the original poster was sorta getting at... what is the practical difference of these two methods in terms of taste, etc?

__________________
rcd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2006, 07:32 PM   #17
dougjones31
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 351
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Carbon Dioxide is needed for proper aging.

Bottle Conditioning makes CO2. Mostly done at room temp to make the secondary fermentation , which is required to carbonate), happen faster. You can bottle condition at fridge temps but it will take a lot longer.

Keg Conditioning requires CO2. Mostly done at fridge temps. We typically force carb in the fridge since secondary fermentation is not used.


Aging takes a specific amount of time for any specific beer. Each beer is different.

Whatever the perfect aging time is for a bottled beer......the aging time is increased for a kegged beer that is cold aged. It just takes longer for the chemical reactions to happen....therefore it takes longer to age in the cold.


So.....If you want beer to age quickly.....(Kegs-force carb it) and age it at room temp.

If you want the beer to age slower so that you can store it longer before it starts going downhill.....then age it in the fridge.


I have split batches and aged them differently to see what the different aging process does. It messes with time.....but the taste of the beer is the same once it has peaked.

__________________
dougjones31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2006, 07:45 PM   #18
rcd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 103
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dougjones31

So.....If you want beer to age quickly.....(Kegs-force carb it) and age it at room temp.

If you want the beer to age slower so that you can store it longer before it starts going downhill.....then age it in the fridge.
Good point. That raises another question, though: if you keg, then put in the fridge to force carbonate, then remove from the fridge to condition more rapidly at room temp, do you hurt the flavor by going from warm>cold>warm>(ultimately)cold? If not, I don't see why everyone wouldn't just do this instead of leaving it in the fridge to condition. Well, other than the fact that you can drink it while it's still conditioning hehehe
__________________
rcd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2006, 08:01 PM   #19
dougjones31
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 351
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

You do not have to cool the keg to force carbonate it. It just takes more pressure to carb a warm keg. Force carb it warm if you are going to age it warm. Force carb it cold if you are going to age it cold.

Temperature fluctuations will degrade the beer. So you are right.....you do not want to go cold-warm-cold-warm etc.


I just hook my kegs up for a few seconds every night with the regulator set at the correct pressure according to the temp of the keg. After a few nights I usually notice that the regulator does not release any co2 when I hook it up. That means it is carbed correctly.


Get a good carbonation chart so that you know what you are doing........................http://www.ebrew.com/primarynews/ct_...tion_chart.htm

__________________

dougjones31 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-28-2006, 08:10 PM   #20
rcd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Knoxville, TN
Posts: 103
Default

Good call. thanks

__________________
rcd is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Conditioning Temperature? Stevorino General Techniques 17 12-29-2012 07:57 PM
Better Conditioning Temperature?? Pangea General Techniques 0 05-11-2009 02:06 PM
Keg conditioning temperature nostalgia Bottling/Kegging 5 08-16-2008 06:04 PM
Conditioning Temperature PalmBeachPaul General Techniques 3 07-26-2008 07:12 PM
temperature for conditioning Ras Skipper General Techniques 5 12-13-2007 03:38 AM