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-   -   Keg conditioning temperature (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/keg-conditioning-temperature-13717/)

gonzoflick 09-18-2006 04:30 PM

Keg conditioning temperature
 
I finally have some brews on tap with some ready to keg. I dont have to rush my next batch, so for the ones almost ready I want to condition them for a better taste. Can I just keg them and put them in my kegerator and let them age or do they age better at room temp?

Reason for doing this is Id like to sample the product every once in a while to see if quality improves.

MrSaLTy 09-18-2006 06:22 PM

I put it in the keg after its done fermenting, hook it to the gas and put it in the keg fridge at about 36 degrees. I let it age there for however long I want. Others may do it different but this works for me.

kornkob 09-18-2006 06:34 PM

Treat kegged beer just like you'd treat bottled beer and you can't go wrong. Beer is beer--- it doesn't really care what kind of container it is in.

gonzoflick 09-19-2006 04:28 AM

But what im asking it does it age better at room temp or can I chill it and it will still age?

dougjones31 09-19-2006 04:33 PM

You will get varying opinions on that question.

I age mine @45 degrees. What you will discover is that every different beer has a different length of aging that it needs. I notice that cold aging stretches this out a bit. Maybe 3 weeks instead of 2......or 6 weeks instead of 4. If you want it to age faster age it a higher temps.

You should not age beer abouve 68 degrees.

JnJ 09-19-2006 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kornkob
Treat kegged beer just like you'd treat bottled beer and you can't go wrong. Beer is beer--- it doesn't really care what kind of container it is in.

If this is true, then do you "prime" beer your kegging like you do with bottled beer?

MrSaLTy 09-19-2006 10:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JnJ
If this is true, then do you "prime" beer your kegging like you do with bottled beer?


I can't speak for Kornkob, but you can do either. You can add priming sugar and let it carb naturally or you can just hook it up to the tank and let it force carb. Most people who keg probably force carb but some may naturally carb too.

kornkob 09-20-2006 01:35 AM

Kegging lets you choose--- you can carbonate the same as bottling. However, many folks who keg choose to use CO2 pressure to carbonate. Some 'force' it by overpressuring the beer, thus getting the beer up to 'fully' carbonated in a couple days.

However, I carbonate using pressure but I don't overpressure the beer. Beer absorbs CO2 at whatever pressure you apply to it. Overpressuring isn't required and I don't reccomend it because the beer still needs time to age after fermentation anyway. I put the keg under service pressure for the 3-4 weeks that it needs to mature anyway--- when that time is done the beer has started to come into it's mature flavor and is properly carbed.

Denny's Evil Concoctions 09-20-2006 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kornkob
However, I carbonate using pressure but I don't overpressure the beer. Beer absorbs CO2 at whatever pressure you apply to it. Overpressuring isn't required and I don't reccomend it because the beer still needs time to age after fermentation anyway. I put the keg under service pressure for the 3-4 weeks that it needs to mature anyway--- when that time is done the beer has started to come into it's mature flavor and is properly carbed.


Yes, but some of us age in the Carboy. When it's ready, it's ready.

Age in carboy, then rack to keg, then force carb and then drink, for me.

dougjones31 09-20-2006 04:42 PM

The some of you are not aging your beer correctly.

Carbon Dioxide mixes with the beer and forms several compounds. Carbonic Acid being one of them. Your beer needs these compounds to be able to age properly. These compounds help with the mellowing by acually destroying unwanted flavors and mellowing other flavors. The compounds are acids after all. Carbonation also changes the PH of the beer which also affects aging.

Do you think you can age wine uncarbonated and then shoot some co2 to it and drink it right away? Is cheap wine in a box good?


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