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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg / Conditioning
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Old 03-21-2006, 08:42 PM   #1
billism
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Default Keg / Conditioning

Hello,

I'm sure this has already been covered, and I am sorry, I could not find it though...

I am going to do my first kegging. I was wondering... With bottling, conditioning is used for carbonation and developing a better tasting beer. My brew has fermented in the primary for 1 week and 2 weeks in the secondary. Once kegged, should it be stored at fermentation temperature for a while before being chilled in my kegerator and force carbonated?

Thanks!

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Old 03-21-2006, 08:45 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billism
Once kegged, should it be stored at fermentation temperature for a while before being chilled in my kegerator and force carbonated?
There is no need to keep it at fermentation temp in the keg if you force carbonate. Some brewers don't even keep the secondary at fermentation temp.

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Old 03-21-2006, 11:40 PM   #3
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Actually you can force carbonate the beer quicker if you chill down the beer before you keg it. I put the carboy in the fridge for a couple days. The colder the beer is the more it will absorb CO2. You can then rack it into the corny and pressurize to about 10 pounds. It will take 4 or 5 days to fully carbonate.

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Old 03-21-2006, 11:54 PM   #4
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To answer the other part, wait as long to tap the keg as you would for a bottle. Let it sit for 2-3 weeks and then put it on pressure for 4 days.

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Old 03-22-2006, 02:49 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichBrewer
Actually you can force carbonate the beer quicker if you chill down the beer before you keg it. I put the carboy in the fridge for a couple days. The colder the beer is the more it will absorb CO2. You can then rack it into the corny and pressurize to about 10 pounds. It will take 4 or 5 days to fully carbonate.
It's not that colder solution will absorb more CO2 - it will absorb the same amount as a warm solution - it's how FAST it will reach that equilibrium. CO2 will dissolve faster in a colder solution than a warmer one.
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Old 03-22-2006, 04:48 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by bikebryan
It's not that colder solution will absorb more CO2 - it will absorb the same amount as a warm solution - it's how FAST it will reach that equilibrium. CO2 will dissolve faster in a colder solution than a warmer one.
It's actually a matter of pressure and beer temperature. And it is pretty easy to overcarbonate beer if it is to cold and the pressure is to high. At the same pressure CO2 will dissovle faster at lower temp since it is farther away from the equilibrium. But once that is reached there might be to much CO2 in the beer.

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Old 03-23-2006, 01:24 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
It's actually a matter of pressure and beer temperature. And it is pretty easy to overcarbonate beer if it is to cold and the pressure is to high. At the same pressure CO2 will dissovle faster at lower temp since it is farther away from the equilibrium. But once that is reached there might be to much CO2 in the beer.

Kai
Yea, you're right. I was just trying to keep it simple.

Regardless, chilling beer won't allow it to absorb any more CO2 than if it was at a higher temperature, if the pressures were the same. It would just absorb the CO2 and reach equilibrium faster if it was colder.
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Old 03-23-2006, 01:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaiser
It's actually a matter of pressure and beer temperature. And it is pretty easy to overcarbonate beer if it is to cold and the pressure is to high. At the same pressure CO2 will dissovle faster at lower temp since it is farther away from the equilibrium. But once that is reached there might be to much CO2 in the beer.

Kai
You are correct but there are charts available that will tell you what pressure to set your regulator for the temperature of your keg. I keep mine at 38 degrees and I carbonate at 10 pounds. So far so good. I don't think my beer is over carbonated. If I can find one of the charts I will post it for you.
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Old 03-23-2006, 01:31 AM   #9
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Here is a link to one of the charts I was talking about. Fairly easy to figure out.

http://www.ebrew.com/primarynews/ct_...tion_chart.htm

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Old 03-23-2006, 02:32 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bikebryan
Regardless, chilling beer won't allow it to absorb any more CO2 than if it was at a higher temperature, if the pressures were the same. It would just absorb the CO2 and reach equilibrium faster if it was colder.
The cooler the beer, the more CO2 it can absorb at the same CO2 ambient pressure.

The over carbonation that I was referring to, comes from increasing the pressure above the pressure necessary for equilibrium at the desired CO2 content and temp of the beer. This is an effective way of getting CO2 into the beer fast because it's current CO2 content is so far away from the CO2 content that you can get at the set pressure. But it is difficult to measure when to stop and set the pressure back to the pressure needed for the desired CO2 level.

I did this once and had to bleed the keg for 2 days to get back to 5g/L CO2.

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