Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Keg carbonation
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-13-2012, 06:56 PM   #1
owentp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Mattawan, MI
Posts: 311
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Keg carbonation

S it necessary to force carbonate your newly kegged beer? I see if you do within a few days it is ready. How long does it take if you don't force carbonate or is that not an option?

__________________
owentp is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-13-2012, 07:23 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,057
Liked 4469 Times on 3252 Posts
Likes Given: 869

Default

You don't have to force carbonate- you can add priming sugar (about 2 ounces by weight for a 5 gallon batch) and let it sit at room temperature for 2-3 weeks to carb up.

I tend to force carbonate in my kegerator at 40 degrees, with 12 psi set on my regulator. It's ready in 7-10 days that way.

__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-13-2012, 08:03 PM   #3
MazdaMatt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: St. Thomas, Ontario
Posts: 275
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I personally like to cold crash my fermenter, then rack to the keg, set to 30psi and rock it horizontally with the gas-in line submerged for 5 minutes. Then I drop the reg to 10-12, rock it a bit more, set in the fridge. Pints are ready to pour with reasonably-close carbonation level in about 30 minutes, fully disolved gas in 12 hours. Never had to wait longer than 24 hours for proper carbonation levels.

__________________
MazdaMatt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-13-2012, 08:30 PM   #4
krenshaw
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
krenshaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,089
Liked 48 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

i follow yoopers method for forcing.. you could do it quickly, though the extra week of aging for the beer usually makes it taste just that much better.. plus you can't overcarb it that way

__________________

~ A fine beer may be judged with only one sip, but it's better to be thoroughly sure.

DOWN THE HATCH BREWING
Stainless Hop Spider | Wooden Brew Rig | Dual Hinge Keezer Build

Primaries.. oxy :-(
Keg 1: Apfelwein | Keg 2: BlackEyePA version2 | Keg 3: Summer Saison
Bottles: lots full and even more empty

krenshaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-14-2012, 02:15 PM   #5
MazdaMatt
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: St. Thomas, Ontario
Posts: 275
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I've usually got my beer aged enough before it goes into the keg. To wait an additional week for fear of overcarbing is a bit silly when you can fix an overcarbed beer in an hour by venting some carb out of it.

To each their own, but if you're wasting time you're wasting time.

__________________
MazdaMatt is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-14-2012, 04:19 PM   #6
krenshaw
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
krenshaw's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Lancaster, PA
Posts: 1,089
Liked 48 Times on 44 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MazdaMatt View Post
I've usually got my beer aged enough before it goes into the keg. To wait an additional week for fear of overcarbing is a bit silly when you can fix an overcarbed beer in an hour by venting some carb out of it.

To each their own, but if you're wasting time you're wasting time.
letting an ale age an extra week is not "wasting time" .. in my experience most get better with a little age on it.. kind of like a bell curve, the sweet spot is right in the middle
__________________

~ A fine beer may be judged with only one sip, but it's better to be thoroughly sure.

DOWN THE HATCH BREWING
Stainless Hop Spider | Wooden Brew Rig | Dual Hinge Keezer Build

Primaries.. oxy :-(
Keg 1: Apfelwein | Keg 2: BlackEyePA version2 | Keg 3: Summer Saison
Bottles: lots full and even more empty

krenshaw is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-14-2012, 04:22 PM   #7
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Upper Michigan
Posts: 61,057
Liked 4469 Times on 3252 Posts
Likes Given: 869

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MazdaMatt View Post
I've usually got my beer aged enough before it goes into the keg. To wait an additional week for fear of overcarbing is a bit silly when you can fix an overcarbed beer in an hour by venting some carb out of it.

To each their own, but if you're wasting time you're wasting time.
"Wasting time" isn't really an issue, but I want only crystal clear sediment free beer without excessive foaming. I've never once seen a crystal clear beer come out of burst carbed keg in 30 minutes. Or even in 24 hours, once it's been shaken or rocked, but I suppose that would be possible if the beer was super clear going into the keg. If there isn't any chill haze, that's good as well.

It's all about preferences. Some people don't mind a cloudy beer, or one with some sediment in it and would rather have it ready 4 days quicker, I guess. My preference is to drink a perfect beer 5-7 days after kegging it. Sometimes I dryhop in the keg, and that 5 days also allows some more hops flavor and aroma.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006
Yooper is offline
krenshaw Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools