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Old 05-18-2009, 02:28 PM   #1
USMC_Brewer
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Default Keezer Almost Done.... Now I Need You

Well I finally finished the woodwork on my keezer. Now I need you help with what I need to buy to hook it up. I am going to have 3 faucets, they will come out of the diamonds on the top. What type of faucets should I get. Also I am going to be having 1 sanke keg and 2 cornies in the keezer. How much tubing do i need for it and also what size CO2 and regulator do I need?

Thanks in advance








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Old 05-18-2009, 02:46 PM   #2
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Looks great.

5#CO2 is big enough, but bigger lets' you refill less. my 5# lasts about 4 kegs of force carbing and serving. This depends on if you want to store it inside or outside the keezer and how much room you have.

I would recommend spending the Dough up front and getting perlick Faucets instead of going cheap first just to replace eventually as you get sick of your cheap faucets sticking.

Line length depends on several variables, but 10' of serving line from keg to faucet is a pretty safe average. For air lines, just depends on how you're going to route them, it doesn't effect outcome.

You can use just one regulator and split it 3 ways with a hose barb, but this will make all your kegs the same pressure. This may or may not be okay with you as some styles use different carbonation levels. If you want to be able to carb each on at different levels you will need two more secondary regulators.
Check some Online Home brew places, they usually have packages with and without kegs. You will need Ball or pin lock connectors for your cornies and a sanke (I'd recommend low profile) for the full size Sanke Keg.

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Old 05-18-2009, 03:02 PM   #3
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She's a beaut! Are you staining it? I wouldn't mind seeing a few construction pics if you've got'm.

as for faucets, you can wanna go cheap just get regular faucets, or if you've got the $$, go for Perlicks.. Perlicks are highly regarded in these parts for whatever reason. I've got a few of the regulars and never had a problem with'm, but people around here swear by Perlicks.

You'll need some shanks to go with those. Be sure to get the right length.

I rent my 20# CO2 tank from a local welding supply store for around $7 per month. I'd say go with as big a tank you can fit inside your keggerator if you're running a sanke in there. It's nice to be able to set it and forget it for a few months. These regulators are priced pretty well.

I recommend around 8ft of 3/16" beer hose. It's what I use at 40*F and get a perfect pour every time.

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Old 05-18-2009, 03:52 PM   #4
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Sowega's got it.
1. Faucets
2. shanks
3. tailpiece for the shank if it doesn't already have one
4. beer line (about 6-7' of 3/16")
5. gas line (usually 1/4 or 5/16" hose)
6. possibly a manifold or at least some T's to distribute the gas to all 3 kegs
7. CO2 (as big as you can afford or fit in the keezer if that's what you're going to do)
8. regulator
9. Gas and Liquid Disconnects for corny kegs
10. Sanke tap

I'll second the recommendation to go Perlick, you've got a really nice looking setup - don't cheap out on the finishing touches.

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Old 05-18-2009, 03:56 PM   #5
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Also, you're going to want some type of drip try if you haven't already thought about that.

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Old 05-18-2009, 04:07 PM   #6
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What a beautiful job! Love the wood color, and the rustic look...very cool.

Faucets: Perlicks, no question. Don't forget to pair those with a stainless steel shank. I'd also recommend a 90 degree tailpiece.

Beer Line: 10' x 3 of 3/16" (the longer length will enable you to serve at higher PSI for those higher carbonated beers)

Air Line: 1/4" thickness, length depends on your build but probably 4' for each keg. It's a bit tight on some tailpiece connections, but just use some keg lube and/or a lighter. The only way to get it off after that is to cut it off, and you won't have to worry about leaks EVER.

Regulator: Double pressure regulator, I like Micromatic. It's more spendy for the dual pressure reg, but worth it in the long run. It will be less hassle to carbonate your beers, and more enjoyable in the long run.

CO2 Tank: I started with a 10# which is fine, until I saw how much it was to fill up a 20#. It's only about $4 more for me to fill a 20# than a 10#, most of the cost is in the filling fee and hazmat. After filling it 3-4 times, you'll have paid for the extra cost of the big tank...plus you only have to fill it 1-2 times per year. Also, whatever size you get, just leave it outside the keezer and drill a small hole for your air line in the collar. The added space is great, plus it helps with the line clutter.

Manifold: a 3-way manifold for the serving pressure side would be perfect for this setup. I prefer the aluminum block ones to the brass ones, but it doesn't really matter so much since it's hidden.

Drip Tray: Best price I've seen is this 19" stainless drip tray from BarProducts.com. Great construction, and costs just $16 before tax and shipping. Nice solid build quality, and the cheapest by far.
http://www.barproducts.com

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Old 05-18-2009, 04:21 PM   #7
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USMC_Brewer you sure made a beauty, as well as the shanks, faucets, connections, distributers,regulators and hose, you will also need a temperature control for your freezer. Even on it's warmest settting it will be too cold. I found mine at a local refridgeration place, but they are far cheaper online.

www.brewmasterswarehouse.com/equipment/temperature-control
www.micromatic.com/draft-keg-beer/kegerator-conversion-kits-cid-785.html
TEMPERATURE CONTROL @ Williams Brewing

Thanks for showing us!

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Old 05-18-2009, 04:37 PM   #8
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Wow thanks for all the quick replies and knowledge. Looks like I got some shopping to do.

Sowegabrews sorry I forgot to take any construction pics but I am in the process of staining it and putting ploy on it. Ill take some more pics later for everyone.

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Old 05-18-2009, 05:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IrregularPulse View Post
Looks great.

5#CO2 is big enough, but bigger lets' you refill less. my 5# lasts about 4 kegs of force carbing and serving. This depends on if you want to store it inside or outside the keezer and how much room you have.
What is the difference between in or out? (no "feeling" jokes please) I'm in the process of a build myself and have been debating which way to go.

Also, any problems in drilling the side of a refrigerator if deciding to go outside? I'm assuming I could find some sort of grommet or coupler at the local hardware store to protect the hose from the metal sidewall?
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Old 05-18-2009, 05:54 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rottnme View Post
What is the difference between in or out? (no "feeling" jokes please) I'm in the process of a build myself and have been debating which way to go.

Also, any problems in drilling the side of a refrigerator if deciding to go outside? I'm assuming I could find some sort of grommet or coupler at the local hardware store to protect the hose from the metal sidewall?
If you store it inside, the biggest issue is that it takes up space. Secondary issues are hose organization and pressure readings, both of which are trivial and debatable. I drilled two holes in the side of my fridge, and simply ran the lines through without any grommet. Just drill the holes slightly larger than necessary, and seal with silicone sealant or caulking. This will both keep the cold air in, and prevent the lines from moving around and "chafing" the air lines on the metal.
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