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Old 07-15-2009, 03:40 PM   #21
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Follow-up post:

So I tried several approaches regarding keg priming and had some interesting results.

I let the primed kegs sit for about 2-3 weeks at room temp. Then rushed them into the kegerator for a few days to condition. In every case the draw was not as "intense" as I had liked. So I waited a few more days to see if there was a change. After still not getting what I wanted I hooked up the CO2 canister for about another week at 7 PSI and what do you know....perfect carbing. Big healthy bubbles deep into the beer up to the last drop and moderate head. A first for me (after a year).

So, most would argue it's silly to prime if you're going to end up hooking it up to CO2 anyways but I have to admit there is a noticable difference with this hybrid technique. Especially the flavor. Still going to try priming the next several batches upping the sugar till I get a keg that doesn't need CO2 but I have struck a balance that works ok, even if it's not right.

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Old 07-20-2009, 11:22 PM   #22
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I use priming sugar in my kegs as well and have done so for a while now. Actually I use the same amount that I use when I bottle. One thing I noticed is after 3 weeks there's really a lot of CO2 in the keg but no good bubbles in the beer and no head retention. After 5 weeks it's just right with excellent flavor and presentation. Another week or two in the kegerator and it's perfect. Yeah my first few pints are cloudy but I'm fine with that.

My reason for carbonating so is something that's likely just a theory that comforts me. I feel like oxygen that got transfered during the process will get taken care of by the yeast during carbonation. I still use bottled CO2 to pressure up the keg and to push the beer out.

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Old 10-28-2010, 12:01 AM   #23
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I realize this thread is over a year old.

Curious if there were any updates to the data, experiences posted originally in this thread?

I have noticed my beer doesnt have that special something, yea they taste good, what beer doesnt, but it seems like its missing ..... Thinking the sugar does more than just carbonate, thinking it adds to the flavor of the beer too.
Thoughts?

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Old 01-01-2011, 08:03 AM   #24
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I've read articles about this as well..some say carbonation is carbonation and that it makes no difference..there's even a thread here on HBT where someone did an experiment and force carbed and natural carbed the same batch and they could not taste the difference.

I used to natural bottle carb beers but for over a year now since I got my keezer done I have been force carbing...I am now going to revert back to natural as I tend to think it does tatse better..it may just be that it forces you to wait another few weeks if you naturally carb therefore the beer has had more time to set up.

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Old 05-02-2011, 06:00 PM   #25
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2cents...
i've been using 70/30 beer gas blend to push my beer. This mixtures doesn't force carb home brew very well. So i will be using natural carb in my corny's with the amounts given per style in Beer Smith.

Question though. Do any of you find you have to purge the keg a little before you hook up to co2 to dispense? or should it pour like a commercial keg after natural carbing?

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Old 05-06-2011, 01:17 AM   #26
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I'm about to keg my first beer here in a few weeks after bottling several batches. I just got into brewing, so my experience is limited, though I think I can offer some insightful remarks...

When one adds priming sugar to their keg beer, they're adding more fermentable sugars. The yeast remaining in solution work to ferment those sugars as they did during primary fermentation, releasing CO2 in the process. It seems that one would use less priming sugar kegging a beer than in bottling partly because of air space left in the chamber (bottles vs keg); mainly that bottles would have more combined air space than when compared to a keg. For example, if one filled up a bottle half full and another bottle was filled as normal, then one would expect the filled bottle to be better carbonated.

I plan to naturally carbonate my keg beer. Thinking about it now however, I may have a better idea. I'm thinking I might rack my beer from the primary fermentation tank into the keg without any priming sugar. At that point I'll inject CO2 to get rid of the air as much as possible... The beer will then condition in the keg releasing a little bit more CO2. Hows that sound?

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Old 05-06-2011, 01:22 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by helmet1209 View Post
I'm about to keg my first beer here in a few weeks after bottling several batches. I just got into brewing, so my experience is limited, though I think I can offer some insightful remarks...

When one adds priming sugar to their keg beer, they're adding more fermentable sugars. The yeast remaining in solution work to ferment those sugars as they did during primary fermentation, releasing CO2 in the process. It seems that one would use less priming sugar kegging a beer than in bottling partly because of air space left in the chamber (bottles vs keg); mainly that bottles would have more combined air space than when compared to a keg. For example, if one filled up a bottle half full and another bottle was filled as normal, then one would expect the filled bottle to be better carbonated.

I plan to naturally carbonate my keg beer. Thinking about it now however, I may have a better idea. I'm thinking I might rack my beer from the primary fermentation tank into the keg without any priming sugar. At that point I'll inject CO2 to get rid of the air as much as possible... The beer will then condition in the keg releasing a little bit more CO2. Hows that sound?
Well, you use less priming sugar in a keg due to the smaller amount of headspace. In bottling, if you have 53 bottles of a 1.5 inch headspace, that's a lot more than you have in a keg relatively speaking. In your example, a 1/2 filled bottle with MORE headspace will more likely be overcarbed than one with a proper amount of headspace.

Regardless, kegging before the beer is finished will indeed provide some carbonation. But how much is undependable, and may result in either overcarbonation or undercarbonation. It's far easier to let it ferment out, then add a prescribed amount of priming sugar so that you know the beer will be properly carbed.
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Old 05-06-2011, 03:15 PM   #28
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ya i kegged my 90 shilling at 2.0 volumes and i used around 38g of corn sugar, if you were bottling would probably double that. These numbers came from Beersmith although its not in front of me atm.

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Old 05-26-2011, 10:21 PM   #29
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Ok so I just got my keg setup in yesterday but I wont have my keezer for 2 more weeks. I have 2 batches that are ready right now to be bottled/kegged so I was planning on priming with corn sugar in the keg and let them sit at room temp for the 2 weeks till I can cool them down. Basically I want cold carbed draft beer ready asap and I think this is the way to go unless anyone has some better suggestions.

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Old 08-16-2011, 03:50 PM   #30
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Bumping this thread.

I have a blue balls batch (blue moon clone) that is just about ready to keg (about 2 weeks in primary). I normally keg, the catch is that this time I would like to split the batch (5+ gals) between a corny and a case of 16 ounce bottles. What I was hoping to do was to save some time by:
1. Preparing corn sugar solution as if I was bottling the whole batch.
2. Rack from the primary to my keg on top of the sugar solution.
3. After filling the keg (most of the batch), seal and hit it with a few psi of gas, enough to serve.
4. Fill my bottles from the keg (and cap the bottles).
5. Use the remaining part of the batch to refill the keg as much as possible.
6. Remove air from the keg via hitting it with CO2 and venting a couple of times.

After this, I would leave the keg and bottles in the basement elevated (about 65 degrees) or in a bathroom (70+ degrees) to carbonate.

There should be extra head space in the keg, hopefully this will prevent over-carbonating the beer? Alternatively, could I vent it once or twice during the carbonation phase?

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