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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Help with foam problem!
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Old 03-19-2011, 04:52 AM   #1
italynstallyn44
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Default Help with foam problem!

So I am having a problem with excessive foam on my pours. Here is a little bit about my setup. I have a two tap tower on my kegerator. 10 ft. of beer lines, perlick faucets, and 11psi (used set it and forget it method to carb). Temp is ~38 degrees.

Usually my first pour after not using the tap for a day or so goes just fine, no foam. But my problem is the subsequent pours. I open the tap quickly and fully open, and The first second of the pour seems very pressurized (little hiss sound when opening the tap) and it pours mostly foam for the first second. After that it slows and pours nicely. But that first second of the pour is producing about 3-4 inches of foam in the glass. Can anyone give me some suggestions on how to fix this? Thanks.

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Old 03-19-2011, 05:00 AM   #2
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Your system looks pretty well balanced and at the correct temps and pressures. If I had to take a wild guess I'd say the beer line in your tower is not chilled. If the line in your tower is warm the co2 will come out of solution in that part of the line giving you the hiss and foamy pour. As the cold beer from the portion of the line inside your kegerator comes up into the line it is cold and cools the line in the tower and the rest of your pour is fine. If I'm correct the solution is to deal with the first part of the pour being foamy, or chill the line inside the tower. There are some DIY threads around here and elsewhere that you can probably find with Google. You most likely have to get a fan blowing some air from your kegerator into the tower, or use chilled glycol lines run into the tower. Sometimes upping the insulation in the tower will do the trick also.

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Old 03-19-2011, 05:14 AM   #3
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i do have two copper lines running into the fridge up to about 3 inches below the shanks. I also have insulation around the copper lines in the tower.

With that said, my pours in between beers is no more than 30 min. Even with a poorly cooled tower, i wouldn't think the beer could warm up dramatically in that time. But it's possible I guess.

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Old 03-19-2011, 05:24 AM   #4
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Hmmm. Sounds like you do have something of a tower cooling solution in place. Still that could be the area of the problem It is difficult trying to sort of envision what it could be without being there and watching and seeing the system. I did think of one other thing it could be. Most people coil their lines up inside the kegerator. If you do this you should try to set the coil horizontally. If the coil is vertical it can create zones of different pressure within the lines. As the beer is traveling uphill in the loop it encounters more resistance/pressure than when it is traveling downhill. This can create foam in the pour, although I would think the foam would be more consistent throughout your entire pour if that was the problem.

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Old 04-02-2011, 03:21 AM   #5
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I'm still getting a burst of foam in the first second or two of the pour. After that initial burst I get a nice slow pour of beer. But that burst is producing 3-4 inches of foam. Any other suggestions?

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Old 04-02-2011, 11:56 PM   #6
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I'm having the same problem! I get a burst of foam and then beer back and forth! Help!!!!

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Old 04-03-2011, 12:05 AM   #7
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Any chance you are having problems with a wheat beer? I've got a perfectly balanced system that pours great except for wheat beers... they always foam.

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Old 04-03-2011, 12:54 PM   #8
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One of my beers is a wheat, but the other is a Irish red ale and I'm having problems with both. If it were tower cooling related wouldn't it be the first pour that would produce the most foam since the beer was sitting in the tower for days? But that's not my problem. My first pour after a couple days is fine. It is the pours that happen after that first pour.

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Old 04-04-2011, 03:51 PM   #9
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HELP!!!!! I'm still getting foam. My fridge was at 38 now I just turned it down. My keg and picnic tap are all in the fridge so everything is cold. My flow was fine for about a week at 10psi. Now all I'm getting is foam and flat beer. Did I have my temp set to high? I don't have a leak that I can see. My beer line is about 5' and coiled up on the keg. Also I now have bubbles in the beer line that I didn't have before. &@#% is my brew bad now? I need this to be ready for a party in two weeks. Help help help.

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Old 04-04-2011, 05:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italynstallyn44 View Post
One of my beers is a wheat, but the other is a Irish red ale and I'm having problems with both. If it were tower cooling related wouldn't it be the first pour that would produce the most foam since the beer was sitting in the tower for days? But that's not my problem. My first pour after a couple days is fine. It is the pours that happen after that first pour.
Try dropping your serving pressure way down to ~5 psi right before your first pour. I doubt your beer is overcarbed but this could slow down your pour enough to reduce foaming. Just remember to set it back to carbonation level when you're done drinking.
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