Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Bottling/Kegging (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/)
-   -   HELP, Amount of sugar, @ Ferm temp, or bottling temp ??? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/help-amount-sugar-ferm-temp-bottling-temp-440968/)

Esmitee 11-05-2013 10:30 AM

HELP, Amount of sugar, @ Ferm temp, or bottling temp ???
 
Kinda new to bottling.
Using a carbonating app. they ask about the temp. of your beer. I'm using Tasty Brews app, and beersmith's app. They both ask for the temp. I think I read that the temp they ask for was the temp the beer was fermented at?
I also read in Beer smith's they ask for Bottling or Keg storage temp?
if I use Beer smith, I'd use 2.11 oz of corn sugar @ 2.4 vols at my bottling temp of 35., and if I use Tasty brew's , I'd use 4.1 oz @ 2.4 vols @ a ferm temp of 66 ?
it's almost double the sugar. Don't want any bottle bombs, AND I don't want my beer Under Carb'd!

Please set me Straight The Beer is a Christmas Ale (Great Lakes clone) YUM
:tank:

zachattack 11-05-2013 12:21 PM

Use the highest temperature that the beer saw towards the end of (or after) fermentation.

A couple scenarios:

1) Pitch at 65, free rise to 72 during ferment, cold crash at 34 Use 72 degrees

2) Pitch and ferment at 68, store the carboy in your 60 degree basement for a month of bulk aging Use 68 degrees

3) Pitch at 50, ferment at 55, D-rest at 68, lager at 33 Use 68 degrees

4) Pitch at 50, ferment at 55, no D-rest, lager at 33 Use 55 degrees

5) Pitch and ferment at 62 in a fermentation chamber, after fermentation is over toss the carboy in a 70 degree closet for 2 weeks Use 70 degrees

The calculators can make a good approximation of how much residual CO2 is in solution. But remember it's all an approximation, so many people (I know Yooper is one :p) just add one ounce of corn sugar per gallon of finished beer and call it a day.

BigFloyd 11-05-2013 03:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zachattack (Post 5640181)
Use the highest temperature that the beer saw towards the end of (or after) fermentation.

A couple scenarios:

1) Pitch at 65, free rise to 72 during ferment, cold crash at 34 Use 72 degrees

2) Pitch and ferment at 68, store the carboy in your 60 degree basement for a month of bulk aging Use 68 degrees

3) Pitch at 50, ferment at 55, D-rest at 68, lager at 33 Use 68 degrees

4) Pitch at 50, ferment at 55, no D-rest, lager at 33 Use 55 degrees

5) Pitch and ferment at 62 in a fermentation chamber, after fermentation is over toss the carboy in a 70 degree closet for 2 weeks Use 70 degrees

The calculators can make a good approximation of how much residual CO2 is in solution. But remember it's all an approximation, so many people (I know Yooper is one :p) just add one ounce of corn sugar per gallon of finished beer and call it a day.


That's as good explanation of something that can be somewhat confusing to new brewers.:rockin:

Esmitee 11-07-2013 12:48 AM

Thanks Zachattack, your info was just what I was looking for. I couldn't have said it better myself LOL They should make it a sticky...
I started out kegging 3 or so years ago, only because it was quicker and faster. I have found out is's much more easy just to give a friend a bottle or 2 without the hassle of filling cabonated beer in a bottle.

I bottled 5 gals lastnite using the ferm temp. All should be good. I think I'm going to just keg the other 5 gals. Thanks again ! :mug:

zachattack 11-07-2013 11:47 AM

No problem! Glad I could help. Kegging definitely takes the guesswork out of bottle carbonation, that's for sure.


All times are GMT. The time now is 07:37 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.