The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Get Rid of Jet Dry Coating??

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-18-2009, 01:02 AM   #1
HoopyFrood
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 4
Default Get Rid of Jet Dry Coating??

Unfortunately I didn't know of the evils of rinse agents like Jet Dry until recently.

I have a large back log of bottles to be used for beer bottling and a bunch of beer glasses that I've run through the dishwasher (some glasses have been run countless times).

Is there any way to get rid of that Jet Dry film? I've been washing glasses by hand now with mild dish detergent (some glasses 10 times) and they still have plenty of Jet Dry residue - they way the shed water and kill beer head indicates that.

I also probably have two cases of beer bottles that are still coated. Does anyone know of any commonly available techniques out there for getting rid of the stuff? Please help if you can!

Cheers!

__________________
HoopyFrood is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2009, 01:05 AM   #2
Hermit
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Alternate Universe
Posts: 2,128
Liked 52 Times on 47 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I saw a post on a 'home tips' site that advocates using vinegar in place of jet dry. That might help with the film.

__________________
Hermit is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2009, 01:21 AM   #3
dontman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Philly, PA
Posts: 2,430
Liked 22 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

You could check out this thread:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/dish...-enemy-147012/

__________________
On Tap: 1. Kelly R. IPA, 2. Roter Hund Hefeweizen, 3. Bud Killer Blonde, 4. Red Dog Pale, 5. Roter Hund Oktoberfest, 6. Pumpkin Ale, 7. McRed's Stout (with new nitro system and stout tap,) Cream Soda, 8. ESB # 3, & 9. Ordinary Bitter.

dontman is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2009, 12:43 PM   #4
HoopyFrood
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 4
Default

Yes, I've read of many "substitutes" for Jet Dry, but nothing to do with how to effectively remove it. I could try the salt scrub...

If anyone is curious I have middle-of-the-road water when it comes to soft vs hard. But I know from drinking beers at restaurants and the same beers at home that my dishwasher has effectively killed all the head retention of my beer glasses.

I search through the "dishwasher/enemy" thread and didn't come up with an answer. I will have to read all the posts later today.

Any other guesses? Thanks for the help!

__________________
HoopyFrood is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-18-2009, 02:05 PM   #5
SpanishCastleAle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 4,384
Liked 29 Times on 29 Posts

Default

Maybe just soak them in PBW/Oxiclean. If that doesn't work maybe try following it with a Starsan soak. The caustic-followed-by-acid cleaning works well in a lot of cases.

__________________
Early brewers were primarily women, mostly because it was deemed a woman's job. Mesopotamian men, of some 3,800 years ago, were obviously complete assclowns and had yet to realize the pleasure of brewing beer.- Beer Advocate
SpanishCastleAle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2009, 03:37 AM   #6
HoopyFrood
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Boise, ID
Posts: 4
Default

Wow! I wrote to Finish (the makers of Jet Dry) and asked them how they would recommend removing the surfactant left behind from the rinse agent - and I heard back in one day! What nice people... Hermit was dead-on!

They suggested using a 50/50 mixture of distilled vinegar and water to soak the Jet Dry teated dishes to remove the surfactant coating.

I used straight Heintz distilled vinegar (5% acidity). I gave the glasses about a 90 minute soak (probably way overkill). I tested a vinegar-treated glass and a glass washed in the dishwasher with Jet Dry countless times over several years. I poured two bottles of Lagunitas Brown Shugga (a beer that has blown my mind with its head-retention capabilities on tap... I've seen a 25oz glass keep a 1/4" foam head till it was gone... which took probably 90 minutes) into the glasses, built a nice foam head, then set a timer and periodically checked back.

The end result? The vinegar-treated glasses had a 60-75% better head retention than my plain ol' dishwasher-washed glasses. It worked!

The head retention, while much improved, was less than I was hoping for: the 90 minute wonder. I wondered if my hand-washing dish soap was adversely affecting things. Not being able to go through five bottles of Brown Shugga, though, I resorted to a simple "salt" test as described in the "Dishwasher/Enemy" thread.

I checked a vinegar-treated glass, a long-since handwashed glass that was re-washed with a new detergent (in case my hand washing soap was part of the problem) and for control, another beer glass that had been dishwashered and jet dried many times over the years. All three stuck the salt evenly like the glass was perfectly clean.

My conclusion? The salt test can indicate if you have a very dirty glass (e.g. someone who never uses soap on beer glasses might build up other strange deposits over time). But it will not reveal the presence of rinse-agent surfactants (i.e. Jet Dry), which has definitely played a big roll in hampering my glasswares' head retention.

For those who ask "does any of this matter?"... it depends. This season Brown Shugga has shown up at several joints around my town. I've had it in glasses that lose their head in 5 minutes and I've had it in glasses that keep the foam until it's gone. Make your own call. For me that creamy foam head does more to give the perception of thick mouthfeel than the actual dextrin content does... and I love a thick beer. A friend of mine really dislikes "nitro" pours for exactly the same reason. Beauty is in the eye (and mouth) of the beer-holder. Do what's right for you!

In the mean time I have to figure out how to vinegar treat something like 30 pint-sized logo glasses... Cheers, everyone!

__________________

Last edited by HoopyFrood; 11-19-2009 at 03:40 AM.
HoopyFrood is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-19-2009, 02:01 PM   #7
SpanishCastleAle
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 4,384
Liked 29 Times on 29 Posts

Default

Quote:
They suggested using a 50/50 mixture of distilled vinegar and water to soak the Jet Dry teated dishes to remove the surfactant coating.
Since that's just a very weak acid I wonder if Starsan would have worked? Only mentioning it because many homebrewers already have some Starsan solution mixed and perhaps could avoid having to mix then discard the vinegar solution.
__________________
Early brewers were primarily women, mostly because it was deemed a woman's job. Mesopotamian men, of some 3,800 years ago, were obviously complete assclowns and had yet to realize the pleasure of brewing beer.- Beer Advocate
SpanishCastleAle is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Powder Coating caskconditioned DIY Projects 6 03-28-2011 04:15 PM
Sticky Leaf Coating aircooled Hops Growing 4 07-09-2009 01:36 PM
powder coating jcalisi DIY Projects 5 03-24-2009 01:56 PM
Coating for mash spoon?? smokysalsa Equipment/Sanitation 9 01-29-2009 05:56 PM
Powder coating a keggle Yunus Equipment/Sanitation 16 11-05-2008 12:03 PM